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Carbon disulfide exposure and neurotoxic sequelae among viscose rayon workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103643
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1990;18(1):25-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
O. Aaserud
O J Hommeren
B. Tvedt
P. Nakstad
G. Mowé
J. Efskind
D. Russell
E B Jörgensen
R. Nyberg-Hansen
K. Rootwelt
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Rikshospitalet, National Hospital, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1990;18(1):25-37
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Carbon Disulfide - adverse effects
Cellulose
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Textile Industry
Textiles
Abstract
In Norway's only viscose rayon plant, carbon disulfide (CS2) concentrations in ambient air usually were between 30 and 50 mg/m3 during the first 23 years of production. From 1970/1971 until the factory was closed in 1982, corresponding values were 10-25 mg/m3. Through all of these years, high peak exposures of CS2 and H2S occurred. In 1986, 16 of the 24 men still at work in 1982 and with at least 10 years' experience in the spinning room agreed to participate in this study. Clinical neurological examination demonstrated abnormalities in 15; neuropsychological tests showed impairments of probable organic origin in 14. Thirteen had cerebral atrophy demonstrated by cerebral computed tomography (CT). Electromyography (EMG) was abnormal in six, neurography in 11. Regional cerebral blood flow measurements indicated flow asymmetries in eight, whereas Doppler investigation of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries, electroencephalography (EEG), and evoked response investigations were mostly normal. Based on these results and the exposure data, a diagnosis of CS2-induced encephalopathy was reached in eight workers; another six had an encephalopathy in which CS2 exposure was regarded as a partial cause. Correspondingly, seven had a neuropathy probably caused by CS2 exposure alone; in three others, CS2 was found to be the partial cause of a neuropathy. This indicates that long-term, relatively moderate exposure to CS2 in association with high peak exposures to CS2 and H2S involves a substantial risk of developing neurotoxic disease.
PubMed ID
2165741 View in PubMed
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Hereditary spastic paraplegia with neurogenic bladder disturbances and syndactylia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41192
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1980 Jan;61(1):35-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1980
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
R. Nyberg-Hansen
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1980 Jan;61(1):35-41
Date
Jan-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bladder, Neurogenic - genetics
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Spasticity
Paraplegia - genetics
Pedigree
Syndactyly - genetics
Abstract
The present paper reports a family settled in the northern part of Norway, with a hereditary neurological disorder consisting clinically of spastic paraplegia associated with neurogenic bladder disturbances and syndactylia. Nine out of 22 members in three generations exhibit these clinical features. The bladder disturbances, being incomplete supranuclear bladder paresis (uninhibited neurogenic bladder), were the main complaint and occurred at an early stage of the disease. The family probably represents an unusual form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). The mode of inheritance is considered to be autosomal dominant.
PubMed ID
6249060 View in PubMed
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[The pill and cerebrovascular disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68050
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1984 Oct 20;104(29):2020-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1984
Author
A. Andersen
A M Wolland
D. Russell
R. Nyberg-Hansen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1984 Oct 20;104(29):2020-2
Date
Oct-20-1984
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cerebral Infarction - etiology
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - adverse effects
Estrogens - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - etiology
Middle Aged
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
During 1982, 7 female patients were admitted to the Department of Neurology, The National Hospital, Oslo, with cerebral infarction (6 patients) or transitory ischemic attacks (1 patient). These patients were remarkable in that they had similar risk factors for cerebrovascular disease--use of estrogen preparations (7 patients) and smoking (6 patients). These case reports suggest that the combination of estrogen preparations and smoking may have a possible potentiating effect in increasing the risk of cerebrovascular disease. (author's modified)
PubMed ID
6506038 View in PubMed
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