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12 records – page 1 of 2.

[Breast feeding and adoption among the Inuit population of Northern Quebec]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4964
Source
Can J Public Health. 1984 Mar-Apr;75(2):137-40
Publication Type
Article

[Breast feeding and protection against infection in industrialized countries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213387
Source
Arch Pediatr. 1996;3 Suppl 1:126s-127s
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Beaudry
R. Dufour
S. Marcoux
Author Affiliation
Département de nutrition humaine, faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation, université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Québec, Canada.
Source
Arch Pediatr. 1996;3 Suppl 1:126s-127s
Date
1996
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Canada - epidemiology
Developed Countries
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infection Control - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
8795989 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for cancer patterns in Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3550
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):527-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
L A Gaudette
S. Freitag
R. Dufour
M. Baikie
R N Gao
M. Wideman
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):527-33
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life expectancy
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology - ethnology
Quebec - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area is remarkably different from those of other populations in the world. The current paper summarizes the most important risk factors in Canadian Inuit residing in the Northwest Territories, northern Quebec (Nunavik) and Labrador, particularly during the time period 1969-1988 covered by the study. Factors considered include: the geographic area and physical environment; population and human environment, including fertility and life expectancy; lifestyle and diet, including tobacco and alcohol use; other lifestyle factors, and health conditions; and health services and cultural accessibility. Development of the cancer registry and population databases supporting the analysis of cancer rates is described. The information in the present paper is needed to interpret cancer incidence patterns and differences among the Circumpolar Inuit of Canada, Alaska and Greenland.
PubMed ID
8813058 View in PubMed
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[Cancer in the Inuit of northern Quebec: results of a survey preliminary to the establishment of a cancer registry]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4186
Source
Can J Public Health. 1987 Jul-Aug;78(4):267-70
Publication Type
Article

A comparison of the assessment and management of cardiometabolic risk in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus in Canadian primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113812
Source
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2013 Dec;15(12):1093-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
H. Teoh
J-P Després
R. Dufour
D H Fitchett
L. Goldin
S G Goodman
S B Harris
A. Langer
D C W Lau
E M Lonn
G B J Mancini
P A McFarlane
P. Poirier
R. Rabasa-Lhoret
M K Tan
L A Leiter
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Cardiac Surgery, Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2013 Dec;15(12):1093-100
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
British Columbia
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy
Dyslipidemias - complications - drug therapy
Exercise Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications - drug therapy
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
To investigate the cardiometabolic risk (CMR) assessment and management patterns for individuals with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Canadian primary care practices.
Between April 2011 and March 2012, physicians from 9 primary care teams and 88 traditional non-team practices completed a practice assessment on the management of 2461 patients >40?years old with no clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease and diagnosed with at least one of the following risk factor-T2DM, dyslipidaemia or hypertension.
There were 1304 individuals with T2DM and 1157 without. Pharmacotherapy to manage hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and hypertension was widely prescribed. Fifty-eight percent of individuals with T2DM had a glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) =7.0%. Amongst individuals with dyslipidaemia, median low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) was 1.8?mmol/l for those with T2DM and 2.8?mmol/l for those without. Amongst individuals with hypertension, 30% of those with T2DM achieved the
PubMed ID
23683111 View in PubMed
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[Evaluation of the implementation of an educational curriculum: optimal interventions for the adoption of an educational program of health in elementary schools].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206816
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Sep-Oct;88(5):351-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Renaud
S. Chevalier
R. Dufour
J. O'Loughlin
N. Beaudet
A. Bourgeois
D. Ouellet
Author Affiliation
Direction de la santé publique, Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal-Centre, Québec. renaudli@ere.umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Sep-Oct;88(5):351-3
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Curriculum
Health Education - methods
Humans
Primary Prevention
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Questionnaires
Schools - organization & administration
Abstract
A multiple case study design is used to explain the level of implementation of a "Heart Health" curriculum by grade four teachers of eight schools in a Montreal multiethnic and underprivileged district. An interview and logbook examine the following variables: 1) personal characteristics of the teachers; 2) organizational characteristics of the schools; 3) characteristics of the program; 4) collaboration between the health and educational sectors; and 5) curriculum level of use and fidelity of implementation. The results show in particular that the personal characteristics of the teachers and the characteristics of the program explain the level of implementation of the Heart Health curriculum.
PubMed ID
9440997 View in PubMed
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[Factors of successful breast feeding in New Brunswick: information and compatible working conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225816
Source
Can J Public Health. 1991 Sep-Oct;82(5):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Beaudry
R. Dufour
Author Affiliation
Département de nutrition humaine et de consommation, Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation, Université Laval, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1991 Sep-Oct;82(5):325-30
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Employment
Female
Humans
Mothers - education - psychology
New Brunswick
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
Although breastmilk is the best food source for the first six months of life, breastfeeding rates at three and six months of age in New Brunswick are quite low. To determine action priorities to increase the duration of breastfeeding, we tried to identify its most important determining factors. Data were obtained from the 431 breastfeeding mothers in a representative sample of 777 infants born after a normal pregnancy. The mother's knowledge about breastfeeding is the most valuable factor that explains breastfeeding duration, followed by the compatibility of the mother's employment with breastfeeding. Interventions directed at improving either of these two factors should be encouraged particularly among mothers of lower socioeconomic status who breastfeed for shorter periods of time.
PubMed ID
1768991 View in PubMed
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Phenotypic heterogeneity associated with defective apolipoprotein B-100 and occurrence of the familial hypercholesterolemia phenotype in the absence of an LDL-receptor defect within a Canadian kindred.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223903
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1992 May;8 Suppl 1:10-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
J. Davignon
R. Dufour
M. Roy
C. Bétard
Y. Ma
S. Ouellette
L. Boulet
S. Lussier-Cacan
Author Affiliation
Hyperlipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research Group, Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1992 May;8 Suppl 1:10-7
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Apolipoprotein B-100
Apolipoproteins B - blood - genetics
Canada
Cholesterol, LDL - blood - genetics
Female
France - ethnology
Gene Expression Regulation - physiology
Heterozygote
Humans
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II - diagnosis - ethnology - etiology - genetics
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Pedigree
Phenotype
Receptors, LDL - analysis - genetics
Abstract
Of 163 individuals with a diagnosis of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), only one subject was found to be positive for familial defective apo B-100 (FDB). The eight-member kindred ascertained through this subject who presented with both a clinical phenotype of FH and the FDB apo B-100 (Arg3500----Gln) mutation was studied. Plasma lipid and lipoprotein profiles, apo E phenotypes, apo B gene markers at the 3' hypervariable region and LDL-receptor haplotypes (ApaLI, PvuII, NcoI), were determined, together with LDL-receptor activity on freshly isolated blood lymphocytes. The FDB mutation, present in four relatives, was associated with three different phenotypes: FH and severe hypercholesterolemia, moderate hypercholesterolemia and normolipidemia. The FH phenotype occurred in the absence of any functional LDL-receptor defect. In homozygotes for the absence of the PvuII cutting site who had the apo B mutation, LDL-cholesterol levels were low in the presence of the apo E3/2 phenotype and high in the presence of the apo E4/4 phenotype. None of the major known environmental influences accounted for the wide range of variation in LDL-cholesterol among the affected members. Further observations in the spouse and offspring of the normolipidemic FDB subject confirmed the association of apo E4, the FDB mutation and the PvuII(-/-) genotype with high cholesterol levels. It is concluded that the phenotypic expression of the FDB mutation may vary widely as a function of the genetic environment within a family.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1505645 View in PubMed
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A polymorphic autoregulatory hormone response element in the human estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) promoter dictates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha control of ERRalpha expression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181433
Source
J Biol Chem. 2004 Apr 30;279(18):18504-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-2004
Author
Josée Laganière
Gilles B Tremblay
Catherine R Dufour
Sylvie Giroux
François Rousseau
Vincent Giguère
Author Affiliation
Molecular Oncology Group, McGill University Health Center, Montréal, Québec H3A 1A1, Canada.
Source
J Biol Chem. 2004 Apr 30;279(18):18504-10
Date
Apr-30-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
DNA Mutational Analysis
Feedback, Physiological - genetics
Female
Gene Dosage
Genetic Testing
Heat-Shock Proteins - physiology
Hormones - physiology
Humans
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear - biosynthesis - genetics - metabolism
Receptors, Estrogen - biosynthesis - genetics - metabolism
Response Elements - genetics
Transcription Factors - metabolism - physiology
Abstract
The orphan nuclear estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) and transcriptional cofactor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. Recently, extensive cross-talk between PGC-1alpha and ERRalpha has been demonstrated. The presence of PGC-1alpha is associated with an elevated expression of ERRalpha, and the two proteins can influence the transcriptional activities of one another. Using a candidate gene approach to detect regulatory variants within genes encoding nuclear receptors, we have identified a 23-bp sequence (ESRRA23) containing two nuclear receptor recognition half-site motifs that is present in 1-4 copies within the promoter of the human ESRRA gene encoding ERRalpha. The ESRRA23 sequence contains a functional ERR response element that is specifically bound by ERRalpha, and chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that endogenous ERRalpha occupies its own promoter in vivo. Strikingly, introduction of PGC-1alpha in HeLa cells by transient transfection induces the activity of the ESRRA promoter in a manner that is dependent on the presence of the ESRRA23 element and on its dosage. Coexpression of ERRalpha and PGC-1alpha results in a synergistic activation of the ESRRA promoter. In experiments using ERRalpha null fibroblasts, the ability of PGC-1alpha to stimulate the ESRRA promoter is considerably reduced but can be restored by addition of ERRalpha. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an interdependent ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha-based transcriptional pathway targets the ESRRA23 element to dictate the level of ERRalpha expression. This study further suggests that this regulatory polymorphism may provide differential responses to ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha-mediated metabolic cues in the human population.
PubMed ID
14978033 View in PubMed
Less detail

Relation between infant feeding and infections during the first six months of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215872
Source
J Pediatr. 1995 Feb;126(2):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
M. Beaudry
R. Dufour
S. Marcoux
Author Affiliation
Département de nutrition humaine et de consommation, Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation, Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 1995 Feb;126(2):191-7
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bottle Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Cluster analysis
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
New Brunswick - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Socioeconomic Factors
Weaning
Abstract
We assessed the effect of the method of feeding on respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses during the first 6 months of life among 776 infants born in New Brunswick, Canada. During a 1-year period, these infants were drawn from the offspring of a population of primiparous women in the province who, after at least 36 weeks of pregnancy, gave birth to one normal infant weighing 2500 gm or more. Data were collected by means of a self-administered standardized questionnaire mailed to every mother a week before her infant reached 6 months of age. The crude incidence density ratio (IDR) revealed a protective effect of breast-feeding on respiratory illnesses (IDR = 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52 to 0.83), on gastrointestinal illnesses (IDR = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.27 to 1.04) and on all illnesses (IDR = 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.82). The protective effect of breast-feeding on respiratory illnesses persisted even after adjustment for age of the infant, socioeconomic class, maternal age, and cigarette consumption (adjusted IDR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.61 to 1.00). Moreover, if we distinguished ear infection from other respiratory illnesses, we observed a separate protective effect for these two types of events. The results of this retrospective cohort study suggest a protective effect of breast-feeding in our population during the first 6 months of life.
PubMed ID
7844664 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.