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24 records – page 1 of 3.

Acupuncture in intractable epilepsy: lack of effect on health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72104
Source
Seizure. 2000 Sep;9(6):422-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
K. Stavem
R. Kloster
E. Røssberg
P G Larsson
R. Dahl
E. Kinge
R. Lossius
K O Nakken
Author Affiliation
Foundation for Health Services Research (HELTEF), Central Hospital of Akershus, Nordbyhagen, Norway. knut.stavem@klinmed.uio.no
Source
Seizure. 2000 Sep;9(6):422-6
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Epilepsy - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess the effect on health-related quality of life of acupuncture and sham acupuncture as adjunctive treatment in intractable epilepsy. We performed a randomized controlled trail with two parallel treatment arms at The National Center for Epilepsy in Norway, a comprehensive epilepsy center. Thirty-four patients with long-standing drug resistant epilepsy completed the study. The intervention consisted of 20 acupuncture treatments (bilateral needling of three acupoints plus one or two individually chosen points) or sham acupuncture (bilateral needling with smaller needles of three points outside the traditional meridians) over 8 weeks. The main outcome measures were changes in mean health-related quality of life scores for the two groups after 8 weeks, using the 89-item Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-89) questionnaire. We found no difference between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups in score changes in any dimension of the QOLIE-89 questionnaire, despite testing a large number of dimensions. We also found no change in QOLIE-89 scores between baseline and 8 weeks in either groups. In conclusion, we could not demonstrate a significant effect of traditional acupuncture or sham acupuncture on the health-related quality of life of patients with intractable epilepsy.
PubMed ID
10986000 View in PubMed
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Allergic rhinitis--a total genome-scan for susceptibility genes suggests a locus on chromosome 4q24-q27.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15411
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2001 Dec;9(12):945-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
A. Haagerup
T. Bjerke
P O Schøitz
H G Binderup
R. Dahl
T A Kruse
Author Affiliation
Institute of Human Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. AH@humgen.au.dk
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2001 Dec;9(12):945-52
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4 - genetics
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Lod Score
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - genetics
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - genetics
Abstract
Allergic rhinitis is a common disease of complex inheritance and is characterised by mucosal inflammation caused by allergen exposure. The genetics of closely related phenotypes such as asthma, atopy and to some extend atopic dermatitis has attracted attention in recent years. Genetic reports of allergic rhinitis on the contrary have as yet been most sparse. To identify candidate regions holding genes for allergic rhinitis we performed a total genome-scan on affected sib-pair families. From 100 Danish sib-pair families selected for allergy, families containing sib-pairs matching a phenotype definition of both clinical allergic rhinitis and confirmed specific allergy were chosen. Thirty-three affected sib-pair families qualified for the scan that was undertaken using 446 microsatellite markers. Non-parametric linkage results were obtained from MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. The study revealed one major candidate region on chromosome 4q24-q27 (LOD=2.83) and eight minor candidate regions 2q12-q33, 3q13, 4p15-q12, 5q13-q15, 6p24-p23, 12p13, 22q13, and Xp21 (LOD=1.04-1.63) likely to contain susceptibility genes for allergic rhinitis. Our findings did not support a previous report of linkage of allergic rhinitis to chromosome 12q14-q24 but they added positive evidence to the asthma and atopy candidate regions 2q33 and 6p23. Further identification of the specific genes involved in allergic rhinitis will give opportunities for improved diagnosis and treatment.
PubMed ID
11840197 View in PubMed
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Cognitive deficit in 7-year-old children with prenatal exposure to methylmercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34120
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 1997 Nov-Dec;19(6):417-28
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Grandjean
P. Weihe
R F White
F. Debes
S. Araki
K. Yokoyama
K. Murata
N. Sørensen
R. Dahl
P J Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Odense University, Denmark. p.grandjean@winsloew.ou.dk
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 1997 Nov-Dec;19(6):417-28
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior - drug effects
Child
Cognition Disorders - chemically induced - psychology
Diet
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - drug effects
Evoked Potentials, Visual - physiology
Female
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Learning - drug effects
Methylmercury Compounds - poisoning
Neuropsychological Tests
Posture - physiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Psychomotor Performance - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
A cohort of 1022 consecutive singleton births was generated during 1986-1987 in the Faroe Islands. Increased methylmercury exposure from maternal consumption of pilot whale meat was indicated by mercury concentrations in cord blood and maternal hair. At approximately 7 years of age, 917 of the children underwent detailed neurobehavioral examination. Neuropsychological tests included Finger Tapping; Hand-Eye Coordination; reaction time on a Continuous Performance Test; Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised Digit Spans, Similarities, and Block Designs; Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test; Boston Naming Test; and California Verbal Learning Test (Children). Clinical examination and neurophysiological testing did not reveal any clear-cut mercury-related abnormalities. However, mercury-related neuropsychological dysfunctions were most pronounced in the domains of language, attention, and memory, and to a lesser extent in visuospatial and motor functions. These associations remained after adjustment for covariates and after exclusion of children with maternal hair mercury concentrations above 10 microgram(s) (50 nmol/g). The effects on brain function associated with prenatal methylmercury exposure therefore appear widespread, and early dysfunction is detectable at exposure levels currently considered safe.
PubMed ID
9392777 View in PubMed
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[Computer assisted neuropsychological testing of children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33835
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Jun 8;160(24):3557-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-8-1998
Author
U. Nielsen
R. Dahl
R F White
P. Grandjean
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse og Helsetjenesteforskning.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Jun 8;160(24):3557-61
Date
Jun-8-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior
Child Psychology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Psychomotor Performance
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to examine the feasibility of a computer-assisted neuro-psychological test program, the Neurobehavioral Evaluation System (NES), in six to seven year-old children. We administered three NES tests, Finger Tapping (FT), Continuous Performance Test (CPT) and Hand-Eye Coordination (HEC) to Faroese and Danish children. The FT and CPT were of appropriate difficulty, while the HE was too difficult for the majority of the children. Boys obtained better scores than the girls, and children who were familiar with computers and video games performed better than those without such experience. Older children also obtained better scores than younger ones, especially in the Faroese group. The Danish children performed better than the Faroese in FT and CPT. In HE there was no difference. The NES tests are feasible for children at this age, but appropriate comparison groups must be secured.
PubMed ID
9641043 View in PubMed
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Cross-sectional study of respiratory symptoms in 1,175 Danish farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16131
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1990;17(1):60-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

[Dietary treatment of celiac disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33290
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 20;119(13):1888-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1999
Author
A. Løvik
G. Fluge
J H Dybdahl
E R Holsdal
J. Ek
R. Røhme
R. Dahl
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling A, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 20;119(13):1888-91
Date
May-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Celiac Disease - complications - diet therapy
Child
Controlled Clinical Trials
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Gluten - administration & dosage
Guidelines
Humans
Patient compliance
Patient Education
Abstract
Life-long gluten-free diet is the established therapy of coeliac disease. Patients suffering from dermatitis herpetiformis benefit from the same treatment. In Norway the gluten-free diet has excluded oats as well as wheat, rye and barley. The basis for this recommendation was a 1972 report indicating that ten out of 23 children consuming oats as part of their gluten-free diet for at least 18 months developed signs of damage to the intestinal mucosa. During the last decades, the clinical picture of coeliac disease has changed as a result of better diagnostic tools. Controlled clinical trials during the last few years indicate that some patients may tolerate small amounts of oats in their gluten-free diet. As a consequence, patients may be confused with regard to what dietary regime is recommended in coeliac disease. Compliance with gluten-free diet is important to secure growth and development, the all-round condition, fertility, bone density and a reduced risk of nutrient deficiency and malignancy. Consensus on dietary treatment is essential. A number of controlled trials are under way and the outcome of these studies will in a few years determine whether oats might be included in the standard gluten-free diet. So far oats are not recommended. The physician who makes the diagnosis is responsible for all patients getting adequate dietary counselling and management. Dietary advice given by health personnel must be consistent.
PubMed ID
10382335 View in PubMed
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[Does the month of birth play any role in allergic diseases?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242817
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Oct 18;144(42):3122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-1982
Author
J. Korsgaard
R. Dahl
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Oct 18;144(42):3122-5
Date
Oct-18-1982
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Delivery, Obstetric
Denmark
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Seasons
PubMed ID
7157526 View in PubMed
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[Drastic increase in mesothelioma cases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26362
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 May 19;148(21):1313-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-1986

Feasibility and validity of three computer-assisted neurobehavioral tests in 7-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34725
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 1996 Jul-Aug;18(4):413-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Dahl
R F White
P. Weihe
N. Sørensen
R. Letz
H K Hudnell
D A Otto
P. Grandjean
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Odense University, Denmark.
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 1996 Jul-Aug;18(4):413-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Denmark
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation - methods
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mercury - blood - toxicity
Neuropsychological Tests - standards
Neurotoxins - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Visual Acuity - physiology
Visual Perception - physiology
Abstract
Three tests from the computerized Neurobehavioral Examination System (NES) were administered to a group of 917 Faroese children at approximately 7 years of age. The NES Continuous Performance Test (CPT) was modified to use animal silhouettes as stimuli instead of letters. Almost all children completed Finger Tapping (FT), the modified CPT, and Hand-Eye Coordination (HE). However, 18% of the children missed at least 25% of the stimuli on the CPT (full test period), and 37% of the children did not improve their HE performance by at least 10%, as compared to the first trial. Boys obtained better results than girls, and older children performed better than younger ones. However, both factors were confounded by acquaintance with computer games. Children who used glasses, who had strabismus, or who had decreased contrast sensitivity obtained less satisfactory scores, especially on CPT and HE. The NES performance was significantly associated with functional neurological performance, including catching a ball, diadochokinesia, and finger agnosia. Slight, though statistically significant, decrements were seen with increased levels of prenatal exposure to neurotoxicants, as indicated by the mercury concentrations in cord blood obtained at the time of birth. In conclusion, the tests were feasible in this age group after slight modifications, and the test results showed meaningful associations with major predictors, thus supporting the validity of the data.
PubMed ID
8866532 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.