Skip header and navigation

Refine By

19 records – page 1 of 2.

Acute infections and venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130192
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
M. Schmidt
E. Horvath-Puho
R W Thomsen
L. Smeeth
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten.schmidt@dce.au.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Algorithms
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - complications
Bacterial Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - complications
Cross Infection - complications - drug therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Intraabdominal Infections - complications
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Embolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Diseases, Bacterial - complications
Urinary Tract Infections - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Data on the association between acute infections and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse. We examined whether various hospital-diagnosed infections or infections treated in the community increase the risk of VTE.
We conducted this population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark (population 1.8 million) using medical databases. We identified all patients with a first hospital-diagnosed VTE during the period 1999-2009 (n = 15 009). For each case, we selected 10 controls from the general population matched for age, gender and county of residence (n = 150 074). We identified all hospital-diagnosed infections and community prescriptions for antibiotics 1 year predating VTE. We used odds ratios from a conditional logistic regression model to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of VTE within different time intervals of the first year after infection, controlling for confounding.
Respiratory tract, urinary tract, skin, intra-abdominal and bacteraemic infections diagnosed in hospital or treated in the community were associated with a greater than equal to twofold increased VTE risk. The association was strongest within the first 2 weeks after infection onset, gradually declining thereafter. Compared with individuals without infection during the year before VTE, the IRR for VTE within the first 3 months after infection was 12.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.3-13.9) for patients with hospital-diagnosed infection and 4.0 (95% CI: 3.8-4.1) for patients treated with antibiotics in the community. Adjustment for VTE risk factors reduced these IRRs to 3.3 (95% CI: 2.9-3.8) and 2.6 (95% CI: 2.5-2.8), respectively. Similar associations were found for unprovoked VTE and for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism individually.
Infections are a risk factor for VTE.
Notes
Cites: World J Surg. 2005;29 Suppl 1:S30-415818472
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):819-2721324940
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Feb 11;332(7537):325-916439370
Cites: J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2006 Feb;21(1):23-916475038
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Apr 1;367(9516):1075-916581406
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 May;15(5):291-30316447304
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 May 14;167(9):935-4317502535
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Nov 24;370(9601):1773-918037081
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;63(2):223-819595569
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Mar 1;151(5):531-910707923
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Dec 11-25;160(22):3415-2011112234
Cites: Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2003 Jun;14(4):341-612945875
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Apr 17;363(9417):1295-30515094276
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 May 10;164(9):963-815136304
Cites: Scott Med J. 1981 Apr;26(2):115-77291971
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1985;218(4):417-214083084
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 May 1;135(9):1019-281595688
Cites: Lancet. 2010 Feb 20;375(9715):657-6320149425
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):22-521775345
Cites: Lancet. 1996 May 18;347(9012):1357-618637340
Cites: Cardiovasc Res. 1996 Nov;32(5):822-98944812
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Mar 8;314(7082):722-79116551
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1999 Jun;46(3):263-810421985
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1999 Aug;27(8):1608-1610470773
Cites: J Clin Pathol. 2004 Dec;57(12):1254-715563663
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Dec 16;351(25):2611-815602021
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Mar 26-Apr 1;365(9465):1163-7415794972
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Nov 15;162(10):975-8216207808
PubMed ID
22026462 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol drinking and risk of subsequent hospitalisation with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100920
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-9-2011
Author
J B Kornum
K M Due
M. Nørgaard
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
H T Sørensen
R W Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Institute, Aarhus University Hospital Aarhus Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Date
Jun-9-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption and pneumonia risk in healthy individuals is poorly understood. We examined 22,485 males and 24,682 females from Denmark who were aged 50-64 yrs. Subjects were without major chronic diseases at baseline and had median 12 yrs follow-up for first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia. 1,091 (males) and 944 (females) had a pneumonia-related hospitalisation. Among males, the risk of pneumonia was increased for alcohol abstainers and those who drank large weekly amounts: Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for 0, 7-20, 21-34, 35-50, and >50 drinks per week were 1.49 (95% CI 1.00-2.21), 0.88 (0.76-1.03), 0.87 (0.72-1.05), 1.15 (0.93-1.44), and 1.81 (1.40-2.33), respectively, compared with 1-6 drinks per week. The association between high alcohol intake and pneumonia persisted after controlling for subsequent chronic diseases. Among females, HRs for 0, 7-20, 21-35, and >35 drinks weekly were 1.26 (0.89-1.79), 1.01 (0.88-1.17), 1.10 (0.88-1.37), and 0.54 (0.29-1.01), respectively. For the same moderate to high weekly alcohol amount, infrequent intake yielded higher pneumonia HRs than more regular intake in both sexes. Regular moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased risk of hospitalisation for pneumonia. High weekly alcohol consumption in males and infrequent heavy drinking in both sexes may increase pneumonia risk.
PubMed ID
21659417 View in PubMed
Less detail

Baseline C-reactive protein level as a predictor of mortality in bacteraemia patients: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101941
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Apr;17(4):627-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
K O Gradel
R W Thomsen
S. Lundbye-Christensen
H. Nielsen
H C Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. kog@get2net.dk
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Apr;17(4):627-32
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) level at time of blood culture (BC) draw and mortality following bacteraemia. Our population-based cohort study comprised all first-time monomicrobial bacteraemia episodes in adults in a Danish county during 1996-2004 (n = 5267). CRP was measured within 24 h of the first positive BC draw. Cox regression was used to compute mortality rate ratios (MRRs) associated with CRP level quartiles (10-64 (reference), 65-143, 144-240 and 241-688 mg/L), controlling for age, gender, comorbidity, specialty, acquisition of infection, and infection focus. We also looked for a biological interaction between CRP level and high magnitude of bacteraemia (three of three culture bottles positive). Thirty-day mortality increased with higher CRP level: adjusted 0-30-day MRRs for patients in the second, third and fourth CRP quartiles were 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.69), 1.70 (95% CI 1.40-2.06), and 2.38 (95% CI 1.96-2.87), respectively (p for trend
PubMed ID
20545964 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes and initial glucose-lowering treatment: a 13-year population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272056
Source
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2015 Aug;17(8):771-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
R W Thomsen
L M Baggesen
E. Svensson
L. Pedersen
H. Nørrelund
E S Buhl
C L Haase
S P Johnsen
Source
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2015 Aug;17(8):771-80
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - drug therapy
Drug Therapy, Combination
Early Medical Intervention - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - drug effects - metabolism
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Insulin - administration & dosage
Male
Metformin - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sulfonylurea Compounds - administration & dosage
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine real-life time trends in early glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes between 2000 and 2012.
We used population-based medical databases to ascertain the association between achievement of glycaemic control with initial glucose-lowering treatment in patients with incident type 2 diabetes in Northern Denmark. Success in reaching glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) goals within 3-6?months was examined using regression analysis.
Of 38?418 patients, 91% started with oral glucose-lowering drugs in monotherapy. Metformin initiation increased from 32% in 2000-2003 to 90% of all patients in 2010-2012. Pretreatment (interquartile range) HbA1c levels decreased from 8.9 (7.6-10.7)% in 2000-2003 to 7.0 (6.5-8.1)% in 2010-2012. More patients achieved an HbA1c target of
PubMed ID
25929277 View in PubMed
Less detail

Functional status and quality of life after community-acquired bacteraemia: a matched cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278541
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2016 Jan;22(1):78.e1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Dalager-Pedersen
R W Thomsen
H C Schønheyder
H. Nielsen
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2016 Jan;22(1):78.e1-8
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - complications
Community-Acquired Infections - complications
Denmark
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Severe bacterial infections may have a prolonged negative effect on subsequent functional status and health-related quality of life. We studied hospitalized patients for changes in functional status and quality of life within 1 year of community-acquired bacteraemia in comparison to blood-culture-negative controls. In a prospectively conducted matched cohort study at Aalborg University Hospital, north Denmark, during 2011-2014, we included 71 medical inpatients with first-time community-acquired bacteraemia. For each bacteraemia patient, we matched one blood-culture-negative inpatient control on age and gender. Functional status and quality of life before and after hospitalization were assessed by Barthel-20 and EuroQol-5D questionnaires. We computed the 3-month and 1-year risk for any deterioration in Barthel-20 score and EuroQol-5D index score, and for a deterioration of =10 points in EuroQol-5D visual analogue scale score, and used regression analyses to assess adjusted risk ratios (RR) with 95% CIs. Compared with controls, bacteraemia was associated with an increased 3-month risk for deterioration in functional status as assessed by Barthel-20 score (14% versus 3% with deterioration, adjusted RR 5.1; 95% CI 1.2-22.3). The difference was less after 1 year (11% versus 7% with deterioration, adjusted RR 1.6; 95% CI 0.5-4.5). After 3 months, quality of life had become worse in 37% of bacteraemia patients and 28% of controls by EuroQol-5D index score (adjusted RR 1.3; 95% CI 0.8-2.1), with similar findings after 1 year and by visual analogue scale. In conclusion, community-acquired bacteraemia is associated with increased risk for subsequent deterioration in functional status compared with blood-culture-negative controls, and with a high risk for deterioration in quality of life.
PubMed ID
26384680 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gender differences in the outcome of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: a historical population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279994
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2017 Jan;23(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
J. Smit
L E López-Cortés
A J Kaasch
M. Søgaard
R W Thomsen
H C Schønheyder
J. Rodríguez-Baño
H. Nielsen
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2017 Jan;23(1):27-32
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality - pathology
Staphylococcus aureus
Young Adult
Abstract
Female gender has been suggested to be associated with poor outcome in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB), but existing data remain sparse and conflicting. We investigated clinical outcomes in female and male patients with community-acquired (CA-) SAB.
Population-based medical registers were used to conduct a cohort study of all adult patients with CA-SAB in northern Denmark, 2000-2011. Thirty-day mortality after CA-SAB for female and male patients was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we computed hazard ratios (HRs) of death according to gender, overall and stratified by age groups, co-morbidity level, and selected major diseases while adjusting for potential confounders. Moreover, we estimated 30-day prevalence proportions for SAB-associated infective endocarditis and osteomyelitis by gender.
Among 2638 patients with CA-SAB, 1022 (39%) were female. Thirty-day mortality was 29% (n = 297) in female patients and 22% (n = 355) in male patients, yielding an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.11-1.53). This association appeared robust across age groups, whereas no consistent pattern was observed according to co-morbidity level. Compared with male patients, the prognostic impact of gender was most pronounced among female patients with diabetes (aHR 1.52; 95% CI 1.04-2.21)), and among female patients with cancer (aHR 1.40; 95% CI 1.04-1.90). The 30-day prevalence of infective endocarditis or osteomyelitis did not differ according to gender.
Female patients with CA-SAB experienced increased 30-day mortality compared with male patients. Gender should be considered in the triage and risk stratification of CA-SAB patients.
PubMed ID
27343816 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incidence and prognosis of nontyphoid Salmonella bacteraemia in Denmark: a 10-year county-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70348
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2006 Mar;25(3):151-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
K O Gradel
H C Schønheyder
L. Pedersen
R W Thomsen
M. Nørgaard
H. Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Forskningens Hus, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Sdr. Skovvej 15, P.O. Box 365, 9100, Aalborg, Denmark, 10488@aas.nja.dk.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2006 Mar;25(3):151-8
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and prognosis of nontyphoid Salmonella bacteraemia in a well-defined population in which complete follow-up investigations had been performed. All patients with nontyphoid Salmonella bacteraemia from 1994 through 2003 in North Jutland County, Denmark, were eligible for the study. Annual incidence rates were calculated for 10-year age groups. The North Jutland County Bacteraemia Database (inclusion of subjects), medical hospital records, the Prescription Registry (redemption of prescription drugs), and the Central Population Registry (deaths) were used as data sources. The outcomes were mortality within 30 and 180 days of the first nontyphoid-Salmonella-positive blood sample. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis was performed, first with age and comorbidity as evidenced by Charlson index scores, and second with selected clinical and laboratory prognostic variables potentially related to nontyphoid Salmonella bacteraemia per se. A total of 111 non-typhoid Salmonella bacteraemia patients were included in the study. The incidence rate (mean 2.3/100,000 person-years) increased steadily from 1.9/100,000 person-years in the 40-49-year age group to 14.6/100,000 person-years in those >90 years. Twelve (11%) and 24 (22%) patients died within 30 and 180 days, respectively. Cox regression analyses showed that increasing age and, to a higher degree, increasing levels of comorbidity were independently associated with an unfavourable outcome, whereas none of the clinical or laboratory variables studied were strong independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, the presence of comorbid diseases and old age were independently associated with mortality, whereas clinical and laboratory variables were less important.
PubMed ID
16534567 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multicentre trial of a perioperative protocol to reduce mortality in patients with peptic ulcer perforation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135842
Source
Br J Surg. 2011 Jun;98(6):802-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
M H Møller
S. Adamsen
R W Thomsen
A M Møller
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark. mortenhylander@gmail.com
Source
Br J Surg. 2011 Jun;98(6):802-10
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Protocols
Denmark - epidemiology
Duodenal Ulcer - mortality - surgery
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer Perforation - mortality - surgery
Perioperative Care - methods
Reoperation
Stomach Ulcer - mortality - surgery
Abstract
Morbidity and mortality rates in patients with perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) remain substantial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a multimodal and multidisciplinary perioperative care protocol on mortality in patients with PPU.
This was an externally controlled multicentre trial set in seven gastrointestinal departments in Denmark. Consecutive patients who underwent surgery for gastric or duodenal PPU between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009 were treated according to a multimodal and multidisciplinary evidence-based perioperative care protocol. The 30-day mortality rate in this group was compared with rates in historical and concurrent national controls.
The 30-day mortality rate following PPU was 17·1 per cent in the intervention group, compared with 27·0 per cent in the three control groups (P = 0·005). This corresponded to a relative risk of 0·63 (95 per cent confidence interval 0·41 to 0·97), a relative risk reduction of 37 (5 to 58) per cent and a number needed to treat of 10 (6 to 38).
The 30-day mortality rate in patients with PPU was reduced by more than one-third after the implementation of a multimodal and multidisciplinary perioperative care protocol, compared with conventional treatment.
NCT00624169 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov).
PubMed ID
21442610 View in PubMed
Less detail

Obesity and risk of subsequent hospitalisation with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144594
Source
Eur Respir J. 2010 Dec;36(6):1330-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
J B Kornum
M. Nørgaard
C. Dethlefsen
K M Due
R W Thomsen
A. Tjønneland
H T Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Dept of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. j.kornum@rn.dk
Source
Eur Respir J. 2010 Dec;36(6):1330-6
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Body mass index
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Obesity may be associated with increased risk of pneumonia, but available data on this relationship are sparse and inconsistent. We followed a prospective cohort of 22,578 males and 25,973 females from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study, aged 50-64 yrs and free from major chronic diseases at baseline (1993-1997), for first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia (median follow-up 12 yrs). Compared with males of normal weight, adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for pneumonia were 1.4 (95% CI 1.2-1.7) for males with moderate obesity (body mass index (BMI) 30.0-34.9 kg·m?²), and 2.0 (95% CI 1.4-2.8) for males with severe obesity (BMI = 35.0 kg·m?²), controlling for lifestyle and educational variables. Among females the associations were weaker, with adjusted HRs of 0.8 (95% CI 0.6-1.0) for moderate obesity, and 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.6) for severe obesity. Adjustment for major chronic diseases diagnosed during follow-up eliminated the associations between obesity and pneumonia risk. Obesity is associated with higher risk of hospitalisation with pneumonia among males but not among females, which is apparently explained by occurrence of other chronic diseases.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2011 May;37(5):1298; author reply 1299-130021532024
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2011 May;37(5):1299; author reply 1299-130021532025
PubMed ID
20351023 View in PubMed
Less detail

Outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding among users of traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167109
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Nov 15;24(10):1431-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2006
Author
R W Thomsen
A. Riis
S. Christensen
J K McLaughlin
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. uxreth@aas.nja.dk
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Nov 15;24(10):1431-8
Date
Nov-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors - adverse effects
Denmark
Humans
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage - chemically induced - mortality
Prognosis
Abstract
Few data exist on the impact of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use on peptic ulcer outcome.
To examine the 30-day mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding associated with the use of traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and newer selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors.
Cohort study of patients with a first hospitalization for peptic ulcer bleeding in three Danish counties between 1991 and 2003. Data on pre-admission non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, use of other ulcer-related drugs and comorbidities were obtained from population-based registries. Follow-up data on mortality were obtained from the Danish Civil Registry System.
Of 7,232 patients hospitalized for peptic ulcer bleeding, 28% were current non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug users. Thirty-day mortality was 11% overall, and 13% among current non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug users. Compared with never-use, the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratios were 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.9) for current use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alone and 1.3 (95% CI: 1.0-1.7) for current use combined with other ulcer-related drugs. For users of celecoxib, alone and in combination, adjusted mortality rate ratios were 1.4 (95% CI: 0.5-3.9) and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2-3.5), and for users of rofecoxib, 1.2 (95% CI: 0.4-3.9) and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.5-1.6).
Among patients hospitalized with peptic ulcer bleeding, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including some newer cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, is associated with increased short-term mortality.
PubMed ID
17032286 View in PubMed
Less detail

19 records – page 1 of 2.