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Cancer incidence and mortality across Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203681
Source
Health Rep. 1998;10(1):51-66(ENG); 55-72(FRE)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
L A Gaudette
C A Altmayer
M. Wysocki
R N Gao
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Source
Health Rep. 1998;10(1):51-66(ENG); 55-72(FRE)
Date
1998
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
This article analyses provincial and territorial patterns in incidence and mortality rates for selected cancer sites.
Cancer incidence data were obtained from the National Cancer incidence Reporting System and from the Canadian Cancer Registry. Mortality data are from the Canadian Vital Statistics Data Base.
Age-standardized incidence and mortality rates were calculated for Canada and each province/territory for men and women for major cancer sites for the 1991-1993 period.
Geographic variations in cancer incidence and mortality rates are strongly influenced by trends in the four leading cancers: lung, colorectal, prostate and breast. Cancer rates tended to be significantly high in Quebec and Nova Scotia and significantly low in the three westernmost provinces. These patterns generally reflect provincial/territorial variations in smoking prevalence, dietary habits, and the extent of cancer control programs, such as screening.
Notes
Erratum In: Health Rep 1998 Autumn;10(2):66
PubMed ID
9836886 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence by ethnic group in the Northwest Territories (NWT) 1969-1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4330
Source
Health Rep. 1993;5(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
L A Gaudette
R N Gao
S. Freitag.
M Wideman
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Health Information, Statistics.
Source
Health Rep. 1993;5(1):23-32
Date
1993
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Inuits
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries
Risk factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Abstract' Clear differences occurred in the cancer patterns among the population sub-groups in the NWT. When compared to those for the total Canadian population, rates for all cancers tended to be higher than expected among Inuit, lower than expected among Status Indians, and at expected levels for the Other NWT population. Among Inuit, traditional patterns still persist. Cancers of the lung, cervix, nasopharynx and salivary gland, and choriocarcinoma, occurred more often, and cancers of the breast, prostate, uterus and colon less often than in the total Canadian population. Among Status Indians, small numbers precluded definitive conclusions. However, several cancer sites occurred less often than expected, including colon, bladder and prostate among males, and uterus in females. While no cancer was significantly elevated in either males or females, SIRs for cervix and lung were above 1.0 for females, and kidney cancer was significantly higher when data for both sexes were combined (SIR = 2.0). For the Other NWT group--comprising about 50% of the population--most types of cancers occurred at about the expected rate, except that lung cancer was significantly elevated in females. Nevertheless, the generally high rates for lung and cervical cancer, which were particularly evident among the Inuit, are clearly targets for prevention programmes. It is hoped the cancer registry data now available for twenty years for the NWT, as well as for the overall Canadian Inuit population, can be used by researchers for studies to further determine the etiology of cancers, especially where distinctive patterns occur in these populations.
PubMed ID
8334235 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for cancer patterns in Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3550
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):527-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
L A Gaudette
S. Freitag
R. Dufour
M. Baikie
R N Gao
M. Wideman
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):527-33
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life expectancy
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology - ethnology
Quebec - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area is remarkably different from those of other populations in the world. The current paper summarizes the most important risk factors in Canadian Inuit residing in the Northwest Territories, northern Quebec (Nunavik) and Labrador, particularly during the time period 1969-1988 covered by the study. Factors considered include: the geographic area and physical environment; population and human environment, including fertility and life expectancy; lifestyle and diet, including tobacco and alcohol use; other lifestyle factors, and health conditions; and health services and cultural accessibility. Development of the cancer registry and population databases supporting the analysis of cancer rates is described. The information in the present paper is needed to interpret cancer incidence patterns and differences among the Circumpolar Inuit of Canada, Alaska and Greenland.
PubMed ID
8813058 View in PubMed
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Changing trends in melanoma incidence and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203723
Source
Health Rep. 1998;10(2):29-41 (Eng); 33-46 (Fre)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
L A Gaudette
R N Gao
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa. lgaudet@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 1998;10(2):29-41 (Eng); 33-46 (Fre)
Date
1998
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Melanoma - mortality
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - mortality
Abstract
This article analyzes trends in melanoma incidence and mortality rates. Information on sun exposure supplements these statistics.
Melanoma incidence data were obtained from the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System and from the Canadian Cancer Registry. Cancer mortality data were extracted from the Canadian Vital Statistics Data Base. Information on sun exposure is from the 1996 Sun Exposure Survey.
Incidence and mortality rates were age-standardized to the 1991 Canadian population to account for changes in the age structure of the population over time. The average annual percentage changes in age-specific rates were calculated for selected time periods.
After years of steady increases, melanoma incidence and mortality rates have levelled off as a result of declining rates in younger age groups, and for melanoma of the trunk among men and of the leg among women. Incidence rates for men are now higher than those for women; mortality rates for men are twice as high as for women.
PubMed ID
9842489 View in PubMed
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Incidence and mortality of neuroblastoma in Canada compared with other childhood cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207468
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1997 Sep;8(5):745-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
R N Gao
I G Levy
W G Woods
B A Coombs
L A Gaudette
G B Hill
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1997 Sep;8(5):745-54
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Ganglioneuroblastoma - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Neuroblastoma - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
The incidence and mortality of neuroblastoma was reviewed in the general context of childhood cancer in Canada for the periods 1982-86 and 1987-91. This was done to complement the preliminary work of the Quebec Neuroblastoma Screening Project that is studying the impact of screening North American infants for the preclinical detection of neuroblastoma on population-based mortality. Annual age-standardized incidence rates for all childhood cancer in Canada appear to have declined slightly (nonsignificantly) from 155.1 to 150.8 per million, between 1982-86 and 1987-91; the rates for neuroblastoma were stable between the two five-year periods (11.8 per million in 1982-86 and 11.4 per million in 1987-91). With respect to mortality, the age-standardized rates for childhood cancer in Canada have shown a declining trend between the first and second halves of the decade, from 43.4 to 34.7 per million, while the rates for neuroblastoma have not changed (4.4 and 4.2 per million). The age-specific distributions of incident cancers indicate that neuroblastoma accounts for the greatest proportion of all cancers in children less than one year of age. Similarly, neuroblastoma is the leading cause of cancer deaths in children aged one to four years. Theoretically, infants less than one year of age could benefit most from effective preventive interventions, treatment, and research.
PubMed ID
9328197 View in PubMed
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Trends in breast cancer incidence and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4329
Source
Health Rep. 1996;8(2):29-37(Eng); 31-40(Fre)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
L A Gaudette
C. Silberberger
C A Altmayer
R N Gao
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division at Health Statistics Division at Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Source
Health Rep. 1996;8(2):29-37(Eng); 31-40(Fre)
Date
1996
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Reproductive history
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Rate
Abstract
Breast cancer is the leading form of cancer diagnosed in Canadian women (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer), accounting for about 30% of all new cases. After age 30, incidence rates begin to rise, and the highest rates are among women aged 60 and over. Canadian incidence rates have increased slowly and steadily since 1969, rising most rapidly among women aged 50 and over. Canada's rates are among the highest of any country in the world, ranking second only to those in the United States. After decades of little change, breast cancer mortality rates for all ages combined have declined slightly since 1990. While not dramatic, this decline is statistically significant and is consistent with similar decreases in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia. Breast cancer survival rates are relatively more favourable than those of other forms of cancer. Survival rates are better for younger women and for women whose cancer was detected at an early stage. This article presents breast cancer data from the Canadian Cancer Registry, the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System, and vital statistics mortality data, all of which are maintained by the Health Statistics Division of Statistics Canada. These data are provided to Statistics Canada by the provincial and territorial cancer and vital statistics registrars.
PubMed ID
9110963 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.