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Determinants of AhR-mediated transcriptional activity induced by plasma extracts from Nunavik Inuit adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97135
Source
Chemosphere. 2010 Jun;80(2):75-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Thierry C M Medehouenou
Christian Larochelle
Pierre Dumas
Eric Dewailly
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Axe de Recherche en Santé des Populations et Environnementale, Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec and Université Laval, 2875 Boulevard Laurier, Québec, QC, Canada. marc.medehouenou@mail.com
Source
Chemosphere. 2010 Jun;80(2):75-82
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The exposure of Inuit people to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides has been well characterised but little is known regarding their exposure to dioxin-like compounds, which induce toxic effects through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In order to obtain a global measure of persistent organic pollutants in plasma that interact with this signalling pathway, we used a luciferase reporter gene assay to assess the AhR-mediated transcriptional activity elicited by plasma sample extracts from 874 Inuit adults who were recruited in the course of a prospective epidemiological study conducted in Nunavik (Québec, Canada). Several sociodemographic, anthropometric, dietary and lifestyle variables were considered as possible modulating factors of the AhR-mediated activity in multivariate statistical analyses. The geometric mean AhR-mediated activity expressed as 2,3,7,8-tetachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents was 8.9 pg g(-1) lipids (range:
PubMed ID
20435334 View in PubMed
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Determinants of plasma concentrations of perfluorooctanesulfonate and brominated organic compounds in Nunavik Inuit adults (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149165
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;43(13):5130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2009
Author
Renée Dallaire
Pierre Ayotte
Daria Pereg
Serge Déry
Pierre Dumas
Eric Langlois
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research Unit, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec-CHUL, Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;43(13):5130-6
Date
Jul-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Animals
Bromine Compounds - blood
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Fishes
Fluorocarbons - blood
Halogenation
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and brominated organic compounds (BOCs) have been found in biota and humans worldwide with levels of BOCs being the highest in North America. PFOS and BOC exposure of remote populations that consume species of a marine food web for their subsistence has seldom been investigated. In 2004, we determined the concentrations of these contaminants in 883 Nunavik Inuit adults from the Canadian Arctic and investigated the demographic and dietary factors associated with them. Demographic and dietary information were collected by questionnaires. Multiple linear regressions were conducted to investigate predictors of exposure to those contaminants. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 153 concentrations are presented for comparative purposes. PFOS and PCB 153 were detected in all samples, with plasma concentrations several times higher than BOCs. The consumption of fish and marine mammals appears to be an important contributor to PFOS exposure among Nunavik Inuit. While PBDE 153 also appears as a persistent PBDE congener, exposure to PBDE 47 seems to be more recent in this population. Adoption of a westernized lifestyle seems to be related to an increased exposure to PBDE 47, but specific sources remain to be elucidated. In conclusion, we found that the remote geographical location and traditional lifestyle of the Nunavik Inuit population do not protect them against exposure to emerging POPs, particularly PFOS.
PubMed ID
19673318 View in PubMed
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Determinants of selenoneine concentration in red blood cells of Inuit from Nunavik (Northern Québec, Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299072
Source
Environ Int. 2019 Mar 28; 127:243-252
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-28-2019
Author
Matthew Little
Adel Achouba
Pierre Dumas
Nathalie Ouellet
Pierre Ayotte
Mélanie Lemire
Author Affiliation
Axe santé des populations et pratiques optimales en Santé, Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, Hôpital du Saint-Sacrement, 1050, chemin Sainte-Foy, Québec, QC G1S 4L8, Canada; Département de Médecine Sociale et Préventive, Université Laval, Pavillon Ferdinand-Vandry, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada. Electronic address: mlittle@uoguelph.ca.
Source
Environ Int. 2019 Mar 28; 127:243-252
Date
Mar-28-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Selenium (Se) is a trace mineral essential to human health, and is especially abundant in marine foods consumed by Inuit populations in Nunavik (northern Quebec, Canada), leading to exceptionally high whole blood Se levels. While most epidemiological studies to date examine plasma or whole blood Se, little is known about the health implications of specific Se biomarkers (e.g. selenoproteins and small Se compounds). Selenoneine, a novel Se compound, is found in high concentrations in marine foods (and particularly beluga mattaaq) and the red blood cells (RBCs) of populations that consume them. We report here RBC selenoneine concentrations in a population of Inuit adults (n?=?885) who participated in the Qanuippitaa? 2004 survey. Simple associations between RBC selenoneine and other Se and mercury (Hg) biomarkers were assessed using Spearman correlations and linear regressions. Wilcoxon ranksum tests were used to examine differences in biomarkers and characteristics between tertiles of RBC selenoneine concentration. A multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine factors (sociodemographic, lifestyle, and dietary) associated with RBC selenoneine concentrations. Selenoneine comprised a large proportion of whole blood Se and RBC Se in this population. Age and sex-adjusted geometric mean RBC selenoneine concentration was 118?µg/L (range: 1-3226?µg/L) and was much higher (p?=?0.001) among women (150.3?µg/L) than men (87.6?µg/L) across all regions of Nunavik after controlling for age, region, and diet. RBC selenoneine was highly correlated with RBC Se (rs?=?0.96, p?
PubMed ID
30928848 View in PubMed
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Plasma concentrations of selected organobromine compounds and polychlorinated biphenyls in postmenopausal women of Québec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160811
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Oct;115(10):1429-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Torkjel M Sandanger
Marc Sinotte
Pierre Dumas
Mario Marchand
Courtney D Sandau
Daria Pereg
Sylvie Bérubé
Jacques Brisson
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en santé publique, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec and Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Oct;115(10):1429-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bromine Compounds - blood
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Food chain
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - blood
Middle Aged
Phenyl Ethers - blood
Polybrominated Biphenyls - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Postmenopause
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
Brominated flame retardants, especially polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), have been widely used in North America, but little is known about the level of exposure of human populations to these compounds.
We set out to assess the internal exposure of postmenopausal Canadian women to selected organobromine compounds and to investigate factors associated with this exposure.
We measured concentrations of four PBDEs, one polybrominated biphenyl, and for comparative purposes, 41 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in plasma samples from 110 healthy postmenopausal women who were recruited at a mammography clinic in 2003-2004.
PBDE-47 was the major PBDE congener, with a mean (geometric) concentration of 8.1 ng/g lipids and extreme values reaching 1,780 ng/g. By comparison, the mean concentration of the major PCB congener (PCB-153) was 41.7 ng/g and the highest value was 177 ng/g. PBDEs 47, 99, and 100 were strongly intercorrelated, but weaker correlations were noted with PBDE-153. As the sum of PBDEs (summation operatorPBDEs) increased, the relative contribution of PBDE-47 to the summation operatorPBDEs increased, whereas that of PBDE-153 decreased. PBDE-153 was the only brominated compound correlated to PCB-153. PBDE levels were not linked to any sociodemographic, anthropometric, reproductive, or lifestyle variables documented in the present study. Age and body mass index gain since the age of 18 years were significant predictors of PCB-153 plasma levels.
Our results suggest that exposure to PBDE-47 likely occurs through direct contact with the penta-PBDE formulation, whereas exposure to PBDE-153 may originate in part from the food chain.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17938731 View in PubMed
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Plasma levels of selenium-containing proteins in Inuit adults from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290755
Source
Environmental International. 2016 11; 96:8-15
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2016
Author
Adel Achouba
Pierre Dumas
Nathalie Ouellet
Mélanie Lemire
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Axe santé des Populations et Pratiques Optimales en Santé, Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, Hôpital du Saint-Sacrement, 1050, chemin Sainte-Foy, Québec, QC G1S 4L8, Canada.
Source
Environmental International. 2016 11; 96:8-15
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Selenium - blood
Selenoproteins - blood
Abstract
Selenium (Se) is highly abundant in marine foods traditionally consumed by Inuit of Nunavik (Northern Quebec, Canada) and accordingly, their Se intake is among the highest in the world. However, little is known regarding the biological implications of this high Se status in this Arctic indigenous population. We used a method combining affinity chromatography and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with quantification by post-column isotope dilution to determine total Se levels and concentrations of Se-containing proteins in archived plasma samples of Inuit adults who participated to the 2004 Nunavik Inuit Health Survey (N = 852). Amounts of mercury (Hg) associated with Se-containing proteins were also quantified. Results show that glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), selenoprotein P (SelP) and selenoalbumin (SeAlb) represented respectively 25%, 52% and 23% of total plasma Se concentrations. In addition, small amounts of Hg co-eluted with each Se-containing protein and up to 50% of plasma Hg was associated to SelP. Total plasma Se concentrations (median = 139 µg L- 1; interquartile range (IQR) = 22.7 µg L- 1) were markedly lower and less variable than whole blood Se concentration (median = 261 µg L- 1, IQR = 166 µg L- 1). A non linear relation was observed between whole blood Se and plasma Se levels, with plasma Se concentrations leveling off at approximately 200 µg L- 1, whereas 16% and 3% of individuals exhibited whole blood concentrations higher than 500 µg L- 1 and 1000 µg L- 1, respectively. In contrast, a linear relationship was previously reported in communities consuming Brazil nuts which are rich Se, mainly present as selenomethionine. This suggests that a different selenocompound, possibly selenoneine, is present in the Arctic marine food chain and accumulates in the blood cellular fraction of Inuit.
PubMed ID
27588697 View in PubMed
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Selenoneine is a major selenium species in beluga skin and red blood cells of Inuit from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299984
Source
Chemosphere. 2019 Apr 30; 229:549-558
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-30-2019
Author
Adel Achouba
Pierre Dumas
Nathalie Ouellet
Matthew Little
Mélanie Lemire
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des populations et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Hôpital du Saint-Sacrement, 1050, Chemin Sainte-Foy, Québec, QC, G1S 4L8, Canada.
Source
Chemosphere. 2019 Apr 30; 229:549-558
Date
Apr-30-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Nunavimmiut (Inuit of Nunavik, Northern Quebec, Canada) exhibit a high selenium (Se) status because of their frequent consumption of marine mammal foods. Indirect evidence from our previous studies had suggested that selenoneine - a novel selenocompound - may be accumulating in the blood of Nunavimmiut. We used a liquid-chromatography/inductively coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS/MS) method to measure concentrations of selenoneine and its methylated metabolite Se-methylselenoneine in archived red blood cells (RBC) obtained from 210 Nunavimmiut living in communities along the Hudson Strait, where marine mammal hunting and consumption are most frequent in Nunavik. This method was adapted to quantify selenoneine and its methylated metabolite in beluga mattaaq, an Inuit delicacy consisting of the skin with the underlying layer of fat and the major dietary source of Se for Nunavimmiut. Total selenium concentration was also measured in RBC and beluga mattaaq samples by isotope dilution ICP-MS/MS. The median selenoneine concentration in RBC was 413?µg Se/L (range?=?3.20-3230?µg Se/L), representing 54% (median) of total Se content (range?=?1.6-91%). Quantification of selenoneine in five beluga mattaaq samples (skin layer) from Nunavik revealed a median concentration of 1.8?µg Se/g wet wt (range?=?1.2-7.4?µg Se/g), constituting 54% (median) of the total Se content (range?=?44-74%). Se-methylselenoneine was also detected in Inuit RBC but not in beluga mattaaq, suggesting that selenoneine undergoes methylation in humans. Selenoneine may protect Nunavimmiut from methylmecury toxicity by increasing its demethylation in RBC and in turn decreasing its distribution to target organs.
PubMed ID
31100626 View in PubMed
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Selenoneine is a major selenium species in beluga skin and red blood cells of Inuit from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302494
Source
Chemosphere. 2019 Aug; 229:549-558
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Adel Achouba
Pierre Dumas
Nathalie Ouellet
Matthew Little
Mélanie Lemire
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des populations et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Hôpital du Saint-Sacrement, 1050, Chemin Sainte-Foy, Québec, QC, G1S 4L8, Canada.
Source
Chemosphere. 2019 Aug; 229:549-558
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Beluga Whale
Chromatography, Liquid
Erythrocyte Count
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Feeding Behavior
Histidine - analogs & derivatives - analysis - metabolism - pharmacokinetics
Humans
Inuits
Methylation
Middle Aged
Organoselenium Compounds - analysis - metabolism - pharmacokinetics
Quebec
Selenium - analysis
Skin - drug effects - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Nunavimmiut (Inuit of Nunavik, Northern Quebec, Canada) exhibit a high selenium (Se) status because of their frequent consumption of marine mammal foods. Indirect evidence from our previous studies had suggested that selenoneine - a novel selenocompound - may be accumulating in the blood of Nunavimmiut. We used a liquid-chromatography/inductively coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS/MS) method to measure concentrations of selenoneine and its methylated metabolite Se-methylselenoneine in archived red blood cells (RBC) obtained from 210 Nunavimmiut living in communities along the Hudson Strait, where marine mammal hunting and consumption are most frequent in Nunavik. This method was adapted to quantify selenoneine and its methylated metabolite in beluga mattaaq, an Inuit delicacy consisting of the skin with the underlying layer of fat and the major dietary source of Se for Nunavimmiut. Total selenium concentration was also measured in RBC and beluga mattaaq samples by isotope dilution ICP-MS/MS. The median selenoneine concentration in RBC was 413?µg Se/L (range?=?3.20-3230?µg Se/L), representing 54% (median) of total Se content (range?=?1.6-91%). Quantification of selenoneine in five beluga mattaaq samples (skin layer) from Nunavik revealed a median concentration of 1.8?µg Se/g wet wt (range?=?1.2-7.4?µg Se/g), constituting 54% (median) of the total Se content (range?=?44-74%). Se-methylselenoneine was also detected in Inuit RBC but not in beluga mattaaq, suggesting that selenoneine undergoes methylation in humans. Selenoneine may protect Nunavimmiut from methylmecury toxicity by increasing its demethylation in RBC and in turn decreasing its distribution to target organs.
PubMed ID
31100626 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.