Skip header and navigation

Refine By

81 records – page 1 of 9.

Acute infections and environmental exposure to organochlorines in Inuit infants from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4455
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Frédéric Dallaire
Eric Dewailly
Gina Muckle
Carole Vézina
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Center, 945 Wolfe Street, Sainte-Foy, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - poisoning
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - poisoning
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - analysis - poisoning
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - poisoning
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The Inuit population of Nunavik (Canada) is exposed to immunotoxic organochlorines (OCs) mainly through the consumption of fish and marine mammal fat. We investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on the incidence of acute infections in Inuit infants. We reviewed the medical charts of a cohort of 199 Inuit infants during the first 12 months of life and evaluated the incidence rates of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URTI and LRTIs, respectively), otitis media, and gastrointestinal (GI) infections. Maternal plasma during delivery and infant plasma at 7 months of age were sampled and assayed for PCBs and DDE. Compared to rates for infants in the first quartile of exposure to PCBs (least exposed), adjusted rate ratios for infants in higher quartiles ranged between 1.09 and 1.32 for URTIs, 0.99 and 1.39 for otitis, 1.52 and 1.89 for GI infections, and 1.16 and 1.68 for LRTIs during the first 6 months of follow-up. For all infections combined, the rate ratios ranged from 1.17 to 1.27. The effect size was similar for DDE exposure but was lower for the full 12-month follow-up. Globally, most rate ratios were > 1.0, but few were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
15471725 View in PubMed
Less detail

Altered fine motor function at school age in Inuit children exposed to PCBs, methylmercury, and lead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275653
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Aug 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2016
  1 document  
Author
Olivier Boucher
Gina Muckle
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Aug 26;
Date
Aug-26-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
371758
Abstract
Motor deficits have frequently been reported in methylmercury (MeHg) poisoning in adults. However, whether exposure to neurotoxic contaminants from environmental sources early in life is associated with neuromotor impairments has received relatively little attention. This study examines the relation of developmental exposure to MeHg, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and lead to motor function in school-age Inuit children exposed through their traditional diet.
In a prospective study in Nunavik, children (mean age=11.3years) were assessed on a battery of fine motor tasks, namely the Stanford-Binet Copying subtest (N=262), the Santa Ana Form Board, and the Finger Tapping Test (N=215). The relation of mercury (Hg; as an index of MeHg exposure), PCB congener 153 (PCB153), and lead concentrations in cord and current blood samples to task performance was examined using linear regression analyses.
After adjustment for potential confounders and control for the other contaminants, higher current PCB concentrations were associated with poorer Santa Ana Form Board and Finger Tapping performance. Results were virtually identical when PCB153 was replaced by other PCB congeners. Higher current Hg levels were independently associated with poorer Finger Tapping performance.
This is the first prospective longitudinal study in children to provide evidence of neuromotor impairments associated with postnatal exposure to seafood contaminants from environmental sources. Fine motor speed appears particularly sensitive to the effects of postnatal PCB exposure, which is unusually high in this population. Results with postnatal MeHg are concordant with previous cross-sectional studies with children and adults.
PubMed ID
27575364 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

An environmentally-relevant mixture of organochlorines and its vehicle control, dimethylsulfoxide, induce ultrastructural alterations in porcine oocytes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75392
Source
Mol Reprod Dev. 2006 Jan;73(1):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Céline Campagna
Janice L Bailey
Marc-André Sirard
Pierre Ayotte
Poul Maddox-Hyttel
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche en Biologie de la Reproduction, Département des Sciences animales, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
Mol Reprod Dev. 2006 Jan;73(1):83-91
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Organochlorine chemicals accumulate in the environment, particularly in the Arctic, and constitute potential developmental hazards to wildlife and human health. Although some of their harmful effects are recognized, their mechanisms of action within the target cells need to be better understood. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that an environmentally-relevant organochlorine mixture alters oocyte ultrastructure in the porcine model. Immature cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), partially cultured (18 hr) COCs without treatment or exposed to the organochlorine mixture or its vehicle (0.1% dimethysulfoxide; DMSO) during culture were processed for light and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The organochlorines induced major ultrastructural changes in the COCs: decreased density of the lipid droplets, increased smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) volume and increased interactions among SER, mitochondria, lipid droplets and vesicles. We suggest that these ultrastructural changes facilitate energy formation necessary to produce metabolizing enzymes. Other ultrastructural changes may reflect some degree of organochlorine toxicity: fewer gap junctions and decreased electron density of the cortical granules. Unexpectedly, the DMSO control treatment also induced similar ultrastructural changes, but to a lesser degree than the organochlorine mixture. This study is the first to demonstrate the effect of environmental contaminants on mammalian oocyte ultrastructure.
PubMed ID
16206133 View in PubMed
Less detail

An examination of traditional foods and cigarette smoking as cadmium sources among the nine First Nations of Eeyou Istchee, Northern Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104372
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-2014
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Ian D Martin
Eric N Liberda
Suzanne Coté
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Date
May-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadmium - blood
Child
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cadmium (Cd), a nonessential toxic metal present in the environment, accumulates in the organs of herbivorous mammals which typically are consumed by Aboriginal populations. The relative contribution of this potential exposure source to concentrations of blood Cd was investigated in 1429 participants (age >7 years) residing in the nine Cree First Nations communities of Eeyou Istchee, northern Quebec, Canada. Analysis of variance identified significant Cd concentration differences between communities, sex, and age groups, although these were complicated by significant 2-way interactions. The percentage of participants with Cd concentrations within the adopted health-based guideline categories of 'acceptable', 'concern' and 'action' pertaining to kidney damage was 56.2%, 38.3%, and 5.5%, respectively. Partial correlations (controlling for age as a continuous variable) did not show a significant association between consumption of traditional foods and Cd concentrations (r = 0.014, df = 105, p = 0.883). A significant and positive partial correlation (r = 0.390, df = 105, p
PubMed ID
24781002 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing new dimensions of attentional functions in children prenatally exposed to environmental contaminants using an adapted Posner paradigm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265112
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2015 Jul 30;51:27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-2015
Author
Audrey-Anne Ethier
Gina Muckle
Sandra W Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Joseph L Jacobson
Dave Saint-Amour
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2015 Jul 30;51:27-34
Date
Jul-30-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Chronic exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), lead (Pb) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been associated with a range of attention deficits in children, but it is not known whether selective spatial attention is also altered. We modified the classic Posner paradigm, which assesses visuospatial attention, to also assess vigilance and impulsivity. This paradigm is based on the well-documented findings that a target will be detected more quickly if a visual cue indicates beforehand where it will appear, and more slowly if the cue indicates a false spatial location. In our task, visual distractors were introduced, in addition to the classic Posner trials, to assess impulsivity, and a central smiley face, whose eye-movement cued the location of the targets, to measure spatial attention. This task was administered to 27 school-age Inuit children (mean age=11.2years) from Nunavik (Arctic Quebec, Canada), in which pre- and postnatal exposures to environmental contaminants had been documented from birth. After controlling for the impact of confounding variables, multivariable regressions revealed that prenatal exposures to PCBs and Pb were significantly associated with greater inattention and impulsivity, respectively, while current exposure to Pb was significantly associated with longer reaction times. Although a significant correlation was observed between cord blood PCB concentration and decreased visuospatial performance, no significant association was found after adjustment for confounders. No effect was found for Hg exposures. These results suggest that our adapted Posner paradigm is sensitive in detecting a range of attention deficits in children exposed to environmental contaminants; implications for future studies are discussed.
PubMed ID
26235045 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of pre- and postnatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls: lessons from the Inuit Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4473
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Pierre Ayotte
Gina Muckle
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Centre, Québec, Québec, Canada. pierre.ayotte@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1253-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Breast Feeding
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Forecasting
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Milk, human - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Pregnancy
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are food-chain contaminants that have been shown to induce adverse developmental effects in humans. In the course of an epidemiologic study established to investigate neurodevelopmental deficits induced by environmental PCB exposure in the Inuit population of northern Québec (Nunavik, Canada), we compared three biomarkers of prenatal exposure and models to predict PCB plasma concentration at 6 months postpartum. Concentrations of 14 PCB congeners were measured by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection in lipids extracted from maternal plasma, cord plasma, breast milk (collected at approximately 1 month postpartum), and 6-month-old infant plasma samples. Similar congener profiles were observed in all biologic samples, and PCB-153, the most abundant and persistent PCB congener, was strongly correlated with other frequently detected PCB congeners in all biologic media. When expressed on a lipid basis, maternal plasma, cord plasma, and milk concentrations of this congener were strongly intercorrelated, indicating that PCB concentration in any of these biologic media is a good indicator of prenatal exposure to PCBs. A multivariate model that included maternal PCB-153 plasma lipid concentration, breast-feeding duration, and the sum of two skin-fold thicknesses (an index of infant body fat mass) explained 72% of PCB-153 plasma concentration variance at 6 months postpartum (p
PubMed ID
12842782 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of the effectiveness of radon screening programs in reducing lung cancer mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155396
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Oct;28(5):1221-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Fabien Gagnon
Mathieu Courchesne
Benoît Lévesque
Pierre Ayotte
Jean-Marc Leclerc
Jean-Claude Belles-Isles
Claude Prévost
Jean-Claude Dessau
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine et des sciences de la Santé, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada. fabien.gagnon@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Oct;28(5):1221-30
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Female
Housing
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Mass Screening - standards
Mortality - trends
Program Evaluation
Quebec - epidemiology
Radiation Monitoring - standards
Radon - analysis
Risk Assessment - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study was aimed at assessing the health consequences of the presence of radon in Quebec homes and the possible impact of various screening programs on lung cancer mortality. Lung cancer risk due to this radioactive gas was estimated according to the cancer risk model developed by the Sixth Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations. Objective data on residential radon exposure, population mobility, and tobacco use in the study population were integrated into a Monte-Carlo-type model. Participation rates to radon screening programs were estimated from published data. According to the model used, approximately 10% of deaths due to lung cancer are attributable to residential radon exposure on a yearly basis in Quebec. In the long term, the promotion of a universal screening program would prevent less than one death/year on a province-wide scale (0.8 case; IC 99%: -3.6 to 5.2 cases/year), for an overall reduction of 0.19% in radon-related mortality. Reductions in mortality due to radon by (1) the implementation of a targeted screening program in the region with the highest concentrations, (2) the promotion of screening on a local basis with financial support, or (3) the realization of systematic investigations in primary and secondary schools would increase to 1%, 14%, and 16.4%, respectively, in the each of the populations targeted by these scenarios. Other than the battle against tobacco use, radon screening in public buildings thus currently appears as the most promising screening policy for reducing radon-related lung cancer.
PubMed ID
18761730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between plasma persistent organic pollutant levels and blood pressure in Inuit adults from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108571
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:282-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
  1 document  
Author
Beatriz Valera
Pierre Ayotte
Paul Poirier
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe santé publique et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Canada. beatriz.valera@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:282-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
631157
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Arctic Regions
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Diet
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Female
Fishes
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Inuits
Lindane - blood
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Quebec - epidemiology
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) increases the risk of hypertension in environmentally exposed populations. High POP levels have been detected in Arctic populations and the exposure is related to high consumption of fish and marine mammals, which represent the traditional diet of these populations.
We examined the associations between polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides and hypertension among Inuit from Nunavik (Quebec, Canada).
A complete set of data was obtained for 315 Inuit=18years who participated in the "Santé Québec" health survey that was conducted in the 14 villages of Nunavik in 1992. Fourteen polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 8 OC pesticides or their metabolites were measured in plasma samples using gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Blood pressure (BP) was measured using a standardized protocol and information regarding anti-hypertensive medication was obtained through questionnaires. The associations between log-transformed POPs and hypertension (systolic BP=140mmHg, diastolic BP=90mmHg or anti-hypertensive medication) were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions.
Total PCBs as well as the sum of non-dioxin-like PCBs were significantly associated with higher risk of hypertension. Furthermore, the risk of hypertension increased with higher plasma concentrations of congeners 101, 105, 138 and 187. Models adjusted for BP risk factors became significant after including n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and further adjustment for lead and mercury did not change the results. Regarding OC pesticides, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) was associated with increased risk of hypertension while inverse associations were observed with p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and oxychlordane.
Some PCB congeners were associated with higher risk of hypertension in this highly exposed population. Most associations became significant after including n-3 PUFAs in the models. However, the analyses of OC pesticides revealed divergent results, which need to be confirmed in further cohort and experimental studies.
PubMed ID
23872387 View in PubMed
Documents

1-s2.0-S0160412013001372-main.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Associations between prenatal cigarette smoke exposure and externalized behaviors at school age among Inuit children exposed to environmental contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258359
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2013 Sep-Oct;39:84-90
Publication Type
Article
  1 document  
Author
Caroline Desrosiers
Olivier Boucher
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Eric Dewailly
Pierre Ayotte
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Gina Muckle
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada; Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec City, Québec, Canada.
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2013 Sep-Oct;39:84-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
63846
Keywords
Attention - drug effects
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - chemically induced - psychology
Child
Drug Interactions
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Lead Poisoning, Nervous System, Childhood - blood - psychology
Male
Mercury Poisoning, Nervous System - blood - psychology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - psychology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Smoking during pregnancy is common among Inuit women from the Canadian Arctic. Yet prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (PCSE) is seen as a major risk factor for childhood behavior problems. Recent data also suggest that co-exposure to neurotoxic environmental contaminants can exacerbate the effects of PCSE on behavior. This study examined the association between PCSE and behavior at school age in a sample of Inuit children from Nunavik, Qu?bec, where co-exposure to environmental contaminants is also an important issue. Interactions with lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg), two contaminants associated with behavioral problems, were also explored.
Participants were 271 children (mean age=11.3years) involved in a prospective birth-cohort study. PCSE was assessed through maternal recall. Assessment of child behavior was obtained from the child's classroom teacher on the Teacher Report Form (TRF) and the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale (DBD). Exposure to contaminants was assessed from umbilical cord and child blood samples. Other confounders were documented by maternal interview.
After control for contaminants and confounders, PCSE was associated with increased externalizing behaviors and attention problems on the TRF and higher prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) assessed on the DBD. No interactions were found with contaminants.
This study extends the existing empirical evidence linking PCSE to behavioral problems in school-aged children by reporting these effects in a population where tobacco use is normative rather than marginal. Co-exposure to Pb and Hg do not appear to exacerbate tobacco effects, suggesting that these substances act independently.
Notes
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Jul;42(7):826-3312819442
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Nov;108(11):1079-8311102300
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Oct;111(13):1660-414527847
Cites: Early Hum Dev. 2003 Dec;75(1-2):21-3314652157
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 2004 Jun;60(6):689-9315141400
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2004 Apr;6 Suppl 2:S125-4015203816
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Aug;61(8):836-4315289282
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1992 Mar;31(2):210-81564021
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1993 Sep;114(2):376-908416037
Cites: Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2005 May-Jun;27(3):395-40615939200
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Jun 1;57(11):1377-8415950011
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Aug;116(2):462-716061604
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Oct;62(10):1142-716203959
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2006 Jul 15;15(14):2276-8416774975
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;67 Suppl 8:7-1216961424
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2007 Mar;96(3):377-8217407460
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Dec;109(12):1291-911748038
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2003 Jan 15;53(2):130-512547468
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;17(1):27-3517027287
Cites: Am J Addict. 2006 Nov-Dec;15(6):450-617182447
Cites: Neuropsychopharmacology. 2007 Mar;32(3):693-916554741
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;46(3):362-917314722
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Jun 15;61(12):1320-817157268
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Sep;161(9):857-6417768285
Cites: Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2007 Dec;38(4):255-6917520361
Cites: Dev Psychopathol. 2008 Winter;20(1):139-6418211732
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2008 Feb;10(2):267-7818236291
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Jul;116(7):956-6218629321
Cites: Neurotoxicology. 2008 Sep;29(5):783-80118652843
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2008 Jul;(237):1-1418998276
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Jun;38(3):698-70518250076
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Jun;38(3):680-918775874
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2009 Oct;11(10):1166-7419640836
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Dec;124(6):e1054-6319933729
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2010 Jan;99(1):106-1119793315
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jan;118(1):150-420056582
Cites: Prev Med. 2010 Jan-Feb;50(1-2):13-820026103
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Jul;64(7):622-919703906
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Oct;126(4):705-1120855396
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 2010 Nov;44(15):1058-6220413131
Cites: Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2011 Jan-Feb;33(1):137-4421256428
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 May;93(5):1025-3721389181
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 May 17;183(8):E480-621555383
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Jun;35(6):1081-9121332531
Cites: Environ Res. 2011 Nov;111(8):1173-921764051
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6):1592-922071708
Cites: Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2012 Apr;159B(3):289-9722259195
Cites: Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 Oct;223(4):401-1522562524
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1456-6123008274
Cites: J Pediatr. 2003 Jul;143(1):104-1012915833
PubMed ID
23916943 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Blood and hair mercury concentrations among Cree First Nations of Eeyou Istchee (Quebec, Canada): time trends, prenatal exposure and links to local fish consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298074
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1474706
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Susannah Ripley
Elizabeth Robinson
Louise Johnson-Down
Anne Andermann
Pierre Ayotte
Michel Lucas
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
a Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health , McGill University , Montréal , Québec , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1474706
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fishes
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mercury - analysis - blood
Methylmercury Compounds - analysis - blood
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology - etiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe exposure to methylmercury among Cree, focusing on women of childbearing age, we used data from 2 studies. Multiple regression was employed to examine associations between blood and hair mercury concentrations and consumption of locally harvested fish. Approximately 9.9% of non-pregnant women aged 15-44 y and 3.9% of pregnant women required follow-up according to Health Canada's blood mercury guidance value of 40 nmol/L. 8% of hair mercury observations in the non-pregnant women and 2.5% among pregnant women exceeded the equivalent threshold of 10 nmol/g. The geometric mean blood mercury concentration was 12.7 nmol/L in 1,429 persons aged 8 and over, and 17.7 nmol/L in adults aged 18 and older. The proportion of hair mercury concentrations greater than 12.5 nmol/g decreased in all age-sex groups when comparing the 2002-2009 data to published values for 1993-1994. Among women of childbearing age, local fish consumption was associated with increased blood and hair mercury concentrations. While over 90% of women of childbearing age in this population have acceptable levels of mercury, ongoing intake of mercury suggests that their consumption of fish with known high mercury content be minimised. Reducing consumption of fish known to be high in mercury content needs to be balanced with promoting ongoing connection to Cree culture and land-based activities that are also important determinants of health.
PubMed ID
29785879 View in PubMed
Less detail

81 records – page 1 of 9.