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Annual report to the nation on the status of cancer, 1975-2001, with a special feature regarding survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3895
Source
Cancer. 2004 Jul 1;101(1):3-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2004
Author
Ahmedin Jemal
Limin X Clegg
Elizabeth Ward
Lynn A G Ries
Xiaocheng Wu
Patricia M Jamison
Phyllis A Wingo
Holly L Howe
Robert N Anderson
Brenda K Edwards
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Surveillance Research Department, American Cancer Society, 1599 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. ajemal@cancer.org
Source
Cancer. 2004 Jul 1;101(1):3-27
Date
Jul-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Cancer Society
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Continental Population Groups
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Registries
SEER Program
Survival Rate
United States
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updated information regarding cancer occurrence and trends in the U.S. This year's report features a special section on cancer survival. METHODS: Information concerning cancer cases was obtained from the NCI, CDC, and NAACCR and information concerning recorded cancer deaths was obtained from the CDC. The authors evaluated trends in age-adjusted cancer incidence and death rates by regression models and described and compared survival rates over time and across racial/ethnic populations. RESULTS: Incidence rates for all cancers combined decreased from 1991 through 2001, but stabilized from 1995 through 2001 when adjusted for delay in reporting. The incidence rates for female lung cancer decreased (although not statistically significant for delay adjusted) and mortality leveled off for the first time after increasing for many decades. Colorectal cancer incidence rates also decreased. Death rates decreased for all cancers combined (1.1% per year since 1993) and for many of the top 15 cancers occurring in men and women. The 5-year relative survival rates improved for all cancers combined and for most, but not all, cancers over 2 diagnostic periods (1975-1979 and 1995-2000). However, cancer-specific survival rates were lower and the risk of dying from cancer, once diagnosed, was higher in most minority populations compared with the white population. The relative risk of death from all cancers combined in each racial and ethnic population compared with non-Hispanic white men and women ranged from 1.16 in Hispanic white men to 1.69 in American Indian/Alaska Native men, with the exception of Asian/Pacific Islander women, whose risk of 1.01 was similar to that of non-Hispanic white women. CONCLUSIONS: The continued measurable declines for overall cancer death rates and for many of the top 15 cancers, along with improved survival rates, reflect progress in the prevention, early detection, and treatment of cancer. However, racial and ethnic disparities in survival and the risk of death from cancer, and geographic variation in stage distributions suggest that not all segments of the U.S. population have benefited equally from such advances.
PubMed ID
15221985 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality surveillance--United States, 1990-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3430
Source
MMWR Surveill Summ. 2004 Jun 4;53(3):1-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-4-2004
Author
Sherri L Stewart
Jessica B King
Trevor D Thompson
Carol Friedman
Phyllis A Wingo
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, USA.
Source
MMWR Surveill Summ. 2004 Jun 4;53(3):1-108
Date
Jun-4-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Population Surveillance
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality
SEER Program
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
PROBLEM/CONDITION: Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and is expected to become the leading cause of death within the next decade. Considerable variation exists in cancer mortality between the sexes and among different racial/ethnic populations and geographic locations. The description of mortality data by state, sex, and race/ethnicity is essential for cancer-control researchers to target areas of need and develop programs that reduce the burden of cancer. REPORTING PERIOD COVERED: 1990-2000. DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: Mortality data from CDC were used to calculate death rates and trends, categorized by state, sex, and race/ethnicity. Trend analyses for 1990-2000 are presented for all cancer sites combined and for the four leading cancers causing death (lung/bronchus, colorectal, prostate, and breast) categorized by state, sex, and race/ethnicity. Death rates per 100,000 population for the 10 primary cancer sites with the highest age-adjusted rates are also presented for each state and the District of Columbia by sex. For males, the 10 primary sites include lung/bronchus, prostate, colon/rectum, pancreas, leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, liver/intrahepatic bile duct, esophagus, stomach, and urinary bladder. For females, the 10 primary sites include lung/bronchus, breast, colon/rectum, pancreas, ovary, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, brain/other nervous system, uterine corpus, and myeloma. RESULTS: For 1990-2000, cancer mortality decreased among the majority of racial/ethnic populations and geographic locations in the United States. Statistically significant decreases in mortality among all races combined occurred with lung and bronchus cancer among men (--1.7%/year); colorectal cancer among men and women (--2.0%/year and--1.7%/year, respectively); prostate cancer (--2.6%/year); and female breast cancer (--2.3%/year). For 1990-2000, cancer mortality remained stable among American Indian/Alaska Native populations. Statistically significant increases in lung and bronchus cancer mortality occurred among women of all racial/ethnic backgrounds, except among Asian/Pacific Islanders. INTERPRETATION: Although cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States, the overall declining trend in cancer mortality demonstrates considerable progress in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTION: More effective tobacco-cessation programs are necessary to reduce lung and bronchus cancer mortality among women and sustain the decrease in lung and bronchus cancer mortality among men. Additional programs that deter smoking initiation among adolescents are essential to ensure future decreases in lung and bronchus cancer mortality. Continued research in primary prevention, screening methods, and therapeutics is needed to further reduce disparities and improve quality of life and survival among all populations.
PubMed ID
15179359 View in PubMed
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Geographic variation in trends and characteristics of teen childbearing among American Indians and Alaska Natives, 1990-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129088
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2012 Dec;16(9):1779-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Phyllis A Wingo
Catherine A Lesesne
Ruben A Smith
Lori de Ravello
David K Espey
Teshia G Arambula Solomon
Myra Tucker
Judith Thierry
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. phylliswingo@gmail.com
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2012 Dec;16(9):1779-90
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Birth Rate - ethnology - trends
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geography
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - ethnology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To study teen birth rates, trends, and socio-demographic and pregnancy characteristics of AI/AN across geographic regions in the US. The birth rate for US teenagers 15-19 years reached a historic low in 2009 (39.1 per 1,000) and yet remains one of the highest teen birth rates among industrialized nations. In the US, teen birth rates among Hispanic, non-Hispanic black, and American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are consistently two to three times the rate among non-Hispanic white teens. Birth certificate data for females younger than age 20 were used to calculate birth rates (live births per 1,000 women) and joinpoint regression to describe trends in teen birth rates by age (
PubMed ID
22143466 View in PubMed
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