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Accuracy of trisomy 18 screening using the second-trimester triple test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184867
Source
Prenat Diagn. 2003 Jun;23(6):443-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Chris Meier
Tianhua Huang
Philip R Wyatt
Anne M Summers
Author Affiliation
Genetics, North York General Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Prenat Diagn. 2003 Jun;23(6):443-6
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Chromosome Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Female
Genetic Testing - methods
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Risk
Trisomy - diagnosis
Abstract
To assess the accuracy of the calculated risk for trisomy 18 assigned to individual women screened with the second-trimester triple test.
The study was based on 382598 women screened in the Ontario Maternal Serum Screening Programme between October 1993 and September 2000. Of the women screened, 111 cases of trisomy 18 were identified. Originally, 92874 women were screened using a risk cut-off level method. Estimated risks of trisomy 18 were calculated by applying published population parameters for the remaining women screened using a fixed analyte cut-off method. Women were ranked according to their individual risk for trisomy 18 syndrome in decreasing order and divided into 12 groups. The mean calculated risks of having an affected pregnancy at term for each group were compared with the birth prevalence of the corresponding group after allowing for spontaneous fetal losses.
Agreement between the mean calculated risks and the observed prevalence was seen across the entire risk range, although women identified as having high-risk pregnancies had an actual prevalence that was somewhat lower than that estimated by the screen.
The calculated risk for trisomy 18 syndrome assigned to the individual woman on the basis of the risk cut-off method accurately reflects their risk of having a term trisomy 18 syndrome pregnancy.
PubMed ID
12813756 View in PubMed
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Advanced glycation end products, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products, and risk of colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134920
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Jul;20(7):1430-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Li Jiao
Philip R Taylor
Stephanie J Weinstein
Barry I Graubard
Jarmo Virtamo
Demetrius Albanes
Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. jiao@bcm.edu
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Jul;20(7):1430-8
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood glucose
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Finland
Glycosylation End Products, Advanced - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Receptors, Immunologic - blood
Risk factors
Smoking
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis - blood
Abstract
Advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulate in human tissue proteins during aging, particularly under hyperglycemia conditions. AGEs induce oxidative stress and inflammation via the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) can neutralize the effects mediated by RAGE-ligand engagement.
We examined the association between N(e)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), a prominent AGE, and sRAGE and colorectal cancer risk in a prospective case-cohort study nested within a cancer prevention trial among 29,133 Finnish male smokers. Among study subjects who were alive without cancer 5 years after baseline (1985-1988), we identified 483 incident colorectal cancer cases and randomly sampled 485 subcohort participants as the comparison group with the follow-up to April 2006. Baseline serum levels of CML-AGE, sRAGE, glucose and insulin were determined. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% CI.
Comparing highest with lowest quintile of sRAGE, the RR for incident colorectal cancer was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.39-1.07; P(trend) = 0.03), adjusting for age, years of smoking, body mass index, and CML-AGE. Further adjustment for serum glucose strengthened the association (RR = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.30-0.89; P(trend) = 0.009). Highest quintile of CML-AGE was not associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (multivariate RR = 1.20; 95% CI, 0.64-2.26).
Higher prediagnostic levels of serum sRAGE were associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer in male smokers.
This is the first epidemiologic study to implicate the receptor for AGEs in colorectal cancer development.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21527578 View in PubMed
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Age-specific risk of fetal loss observed in a second trimester serum screening population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176464
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jan;192(1):240-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Philip R Wyatt
Titus Owolabi
Chris Meier
Tianhua Huang
Author Affiliation
Ontario Maternal Serum Screening Database, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pwyatt@nygh.on.ca
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jan;192(1):240-6
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Down Syndrome - blood - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Female
Fetal Death
Humans
Maternal Age
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prenatal Diagnosis
Risk factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate age-specific spontaneous fetal loss rates of pregnancies without known chromosomal or structural abnormalities from mid-second trimester onward.
The study consisted of 264,653 women screened between October 1995 and September 2000 with available pregnancy outcomes. Pregnancies associated with fetal chromosomal or structural abnormalities, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and multiple pregnancies were excluded. Spontaneous fetal losses at or after 15 weeks of gestation were identified. Women were grouped according to maternal age at expected date of delivery. Spontaneous fetal loss rates in each group were evaluated after adjusting fetal losses associated with amniocentesis and identifiable ethnic groups.
Fetal loss rates increased in both younger and older women. The lowest rate was seen in women at mid-20s. Compared with Caucasian and Asian women, black women had higher fetal loss rate at nearly every age group.
The results of the study provided a baseline age-specific spontaneous fetal loss rate of pregnancies at a specified gestational window.
PubMed ID
15672031 View in PubMed
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Antibody Levels and Protection After Hepatitis B Vaccine: Results of a 30-Year Follow-up Study and Response to a Booster Dose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282857
Source
J Infect Dis. 2016 Jul 01;214(1):16-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2016
Author
Michael G Bruce
Dana Bruden
Debby Hurlburt
Carolyn Zanis
Gail Thompson
Lisa Rea
Michele Toomey
Lisa Townshend-Bulson
Karen Rudolph
Lisa Bulkow
Philip R Spradling
Richard Baum
Thomas Hennessy
Brian J McMahon
Source
J Infect Dis. 2016 Jul 01;214(1):16-22
Date
Jul-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Humans
Immunity, Active - immunology
Immunization, Secondary
Male
Middle Aged
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The duration of protection in children and adults resulting from hepatitis B vaccination is unknown. In 1981, we immunized a cohort of 1578 Alaska Native adults and children from 15 Alaska communities aged =6 months using 3 doses of plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine.
Persons were tested for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) levels 30 years after receiving the primary series. Those with levels
PubMed ID
26802139 View in PubMed
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Are cuffed peripherally inserted central catheters superior to uncuffed peripherally inserted central catheters? A retrospective review in a tertiary pediatric center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114120
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2013 Sep;24(9):1316-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Luke M H W Toh
Ertugrul Mavili
Rahim Moineddin
Joao Amaral
Philip R John
Michael J Temple
Dimitri Parra
Bairbre L Connolly
Author Affiliation
Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G1X8, Canada. hwtoh@hotmail.com
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2013 Sep;24(9):1316-22
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Catheter-Related Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Catheterization, Central Venous - instrumentation - statistics & numerical data
Central Venous Catheters - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Equipment Design
Equipment Failure - statistics & numerical data
Equipment Failure Analysis
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Tertiary Healthcare - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the use of cuffed peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) compared with uncuffed PICCs in children with respect to their ability to provide access until the end of therapy.
A retrospective review of PICCs inserted between January 2007 and December 2008 was conducted. Data collected from electronic records included patient age, referring service, clinical diagnosis, inserting team (pediatric interventional radiologists or neonatal intensive care unit [NICU] nurse-led PICC team), insertion site, dates of insertion and removal, reasons for removal, and need for a new catheter insertion. A separate subset analysis of the NICU population was performed. Primary outcome measured was the ability of the PICCs to provide access until the end of therapy.
Cuffed PICCs (n = 1,201) were significantly more likely to provide access until the end of therapy than uncuffed PICCs (n = 303) (P = .0002). Catheter removal before reaching the end of therapy with requirement of placement of a new PICC occurred in 26% (n = 311) of cuffed PICCs and 38% (n = 114) of uncuffed PICCs. Uncuffed PICCs had a significantly higher incidence of infections per 1,000 catheter days (P = .023), malposition (P = .023), and thrombus formation (P = .022). In the NICU subset analysis, cuffed PICCs had a higher chance of reaching end of therapy, but this was not statistically significant.
In this pediatric population, cuffed PICCs were more likely to provide access until the end of therapy. Cuffed PICCs were associated with lower rates of catheter infection, malposition, and thrombosis than uncuffed PICCs.
PubMed ID
23648007 View in PubMed
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Arsenic concentrations in prediagnostic toenails and the risk of bladder cancer in a cohort study of male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177829
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Nov 1;160(9):853-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2004

Association between folic acid food fortification and congenital orofacial clefts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182537
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Dec;143(6):805-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Joel G Ray
Chris Meier
Marian J Vermeulen
Philip R Wyatt
David E c Cole
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jray515445@aol.com
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Dec;143(6):805-7
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cleft Lip - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cleft Palate - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food, Fortified
Hematinics - administration & dosage
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Program Evaluation
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
By January 1998, most of Canada's cereal grain products were being fortified with folic acid. Among 336963 women who underwent antenatal maternal serum screening, the prevalence of orofacial clefts did not change from before (1.15 per 1000) to after (1.21 per 1000) food fortification (prevalence ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.86-1.30).
PubMed ID
14657833 View in PubMed
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Association between parental hospital-treated infection and the risk of schizophrenia in adolescence and early adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130242
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2013 Jan;39(1):230-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Philip R Nielsen
Thomas M Laursen
Preben B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Taasingegade 1, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. prn@ncrr.dk
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2013 Jan;39(1):230-7
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility - epidemiology
Fathers
Female
Humans
Infection - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
It has been suggested that infection during perinatal life may lie at the etiological root of schizophrenia. It has thus been hypothesized that the origin of schizophrenia may lie either in direct fetal infection and/or in a generally increased familial susceptibility to infections, some of which may occur during pregnancy. We explored these 2 hypotheses by assessing maternal infection during pregnancy and maternal as well as paternal infection in general as predictors of schizophrenia in their offspring. We found a slightly increased risk to be associated with prenatal infection exposure. However, the effect of prenatal infection exposure was not statistically significantly different from the effect of infection exposure in general. Parental infection appeared to be associated with development of schizophrenia in adolescence and early adulthood. Our study does not exclude a specific effect of infection during fetal life; yet, it does suggest that schizophrenia is associated with an increased familial liability to develop severe infection.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22021661 View in PubMed
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Association between prepartum maternal iron deficiency and offspring risk of schizophrenia: population-based cohort study with linkage of Danish national registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145935
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2011 Sep;37(5):982-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Holger J Sørensen
Philip R Nielsen
Carsten B Pedersen
Preben B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Amager, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Digevej 110, DK2300 S, Denmark. holgerjs@dadlnet.dk
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2011 Sep;37(5):982-7
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - complications
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Family
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Recent findings suggest that maternal iron deficiency may increase the risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in offspring. We initiated this study to determine whether maternal prepartum anemia influences offspring risk of schizophrenia. We conducted a population-based study with individual record linkage of the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, and the Danish National Hospital Register. In a cohort of 1,115,752 Danish singleton births from 1978 to 1998, cohort members were considered as having a maternal history of anemia if the mother had received a diagnosis of anemia at any time during the pregnancy. Cohort members were followed from their 10th birthday until onset of schizophrenia, death, or December 31, 2008, whichever came first. Adjusted for relevant confounders, cohort members whose mothers had received a diagnosis of anemia during pregnancy had a 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.16-2.15) increased risk of schizophrenia. Although the underlying mechanisms are unknown and independent replication is needed, our findings suggest that maternal iron deficiency increases offspring risk of schizophrenia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20093425 View in PubMed
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Association of neural tube defects and folic acid food fortification in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187217
Source
Lancet. 2002 Dec 21-28;360(9350):2047-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joel G Ray
Chris Meier
Marian J Vermeulen
Sheila Boss
Philip R Wyatt
David E C Cole
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Jray515445@aol.com
Source
Lancet. 2002 Dec 21-28;360(9350):2047-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood - therapeutic use
Food, Fortified
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ontario - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Spinal Dysraphism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Many women do not receive folic acid supplements before conception. In response, most of Canada's cereal grain products were being fortified with folic acid by January, 1998, thereby providing an additional 0.1-0.2 mg per day of dietary folate to the Canadian population. We assessed the effect of supplementation on prevalence of open neural tube defects in the province of Ontario. Among 336 963 women who underwent maternal serum screening over 77 months, the prevalence of open neural tube defects declined from 1.13 per 1000 pregnancies before fortification to 0.58 per 1000 pregnancies thereafter (prevalence ratio 0.52, 95% CI 0.40-0.67, p
PubMed ID
12504403 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.