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Alcohol and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9366
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2004 Oct 11;164(18):1993-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-11-2004
Author
Lars Frost
Peter Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. lars.frost@aas.auh.dk
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2004 Oct 11;164(18):1993-8
Date
Oct-11-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The evidence for an association between alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation is conflicting. METHODS: We prospectively examined the association between alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (mean age, 56 years) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. The consumption of alcohol was analyzed as sex-specific quintiles by Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: The mean +/- SD consumption of alcohol per day was 28.2 +/- 25 g in men and 13.9 +/- 15 g in women. During follow-up (mean, 5.7 years), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 556 subjects (374 men and 182 women). After adjusting for established risk factors, there was a modest increase in risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter by increasing alcohol consumption in men. When using the lowest quintile of alcohol consumption in men as a reference, the adjusted hazard rate ratios in men in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.04, 1.44, 1.25, and 1.46, respectively (P for trend, .04). When using the lowest quintile of alcohol consumption in women as a reference, the adjusted hazard rate ratios in women in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.09, 1.27, 1.23, and 1.14, respectively (P for trend, .69). Inclusion of information on the frequency of alcohol consumption and the preferred source of alcohol did not change these associations. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of alcohol was associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in men. In women, moderate consumption of alcohol did not seem to be associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter.
PubMed ID
15477433 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol consumption and the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter--secondary publication. A cohort study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9128
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Aug 29;167(35):3308-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-2005
Author
Lars Frost
Peter Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Arhus Sygehus, Medicinsk-kardiologisk Afdeling A. rlg04lfr@as.aaa.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Aug 29;167(35):3308-10
Date
Aug-29-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
We prospectively examined the association between alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47,949 participants (mean age 56 years) in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study. During follow-up (mean 5.7 years) atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 556 subjects (374 men and 182 women). We found that consumption of alcohol was associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in men. In women, moderate consumption of alcohol did not seem to be associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter.
PubMed ID
16138976 View in PubMed
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Are Antiresorptive Drugs Effective Against Fractures in Patients with Diabetes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99852
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2010 Dec 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-2010
Author
Peter Vestergaard
Lars Rejnmark
Leif Mosekilde
Author Affiliation
The Osteoporosis Clinic, Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine (MEA), Aarhus University Hospital, Tage Hansens Gade 2, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark, p-vest@post4.tele.dk.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2010 Dec 16;
Date
Dec-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We studied whether the reduction in bone turnover by use of antiresorptive drugs is detrimental in patients with diabetes who already have low bone turnover due to hyperglycemia in a nationwide cohort study from Denmark. All users of antiresorptive drugs against osteoporosis between 1996 and 2006 (n = 103,562) were the exposed group, with three age- and gender-matched controls from the general population (n = 310,683). Patients on bisphosphonates and raloxifene had a higher risk of hip, spine, and forearm fractures. However, no difference was observed in the antifracture efficacy between patients with diabetes and nondiabetic controls or between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Too few were users of strontium to allow analysis for this compound. The excess risk of fractures among patients treated with bisphosphonates or raloxifene compared to nonexposed controls was due to the higher a priori risk of fractures among patients treated for osteoporosis. Diabetes does not seem to affect the fracture-preventive potential of bisphosphonates or raloxifene. The low-turnover state of diabetes thus does not seem to be a hindrance to the effect of these drugs against osteoporosis. Therefore, patients with diabetes should receive treatment for osteoporosis in the same way as nondiabetic patients.
PubMed ID
21161194 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Physical Activity and Atrial Fibrillation: Is Resting Heart Rate a Mediator? The Tromsø Study: 806 Board #122 June 1, 2: 00 PM - 3: 30 PM.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273807
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 May;48(5S Suppl 1):223
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Bente Morseth
Sidsel Graff-Iversen
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Lone Jørgensen
Audhild Nyrnes
Dag S Thelle
Peter Vestergaard
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 May;48(5S Suppl 1):223
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
PubMed ID
27359949 View in PubMed
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Birth defects after use of antithyroid drugs in early pregnancy: a Swedish nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285928
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2017 Oct;177(4):369-378
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Stine Linding Andersen
Stefan Lönn
Peter Vestergaard
Ove Törring
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2017 Oct;177(4):369-378
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adult
Antithyroid Agents - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - drug effects
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Antithyroid drugs (ATDs) may have teratogenic effects, but more evidence is needed on the risk and types of birth defects after the use of methimazole (MMI) and propylthiouracil (PTU). This study aimed to evaluate the association between the use of ATDs in early pregnancy and birth defects.
Swedish nationwide register-based cohort study.
The study included 684 340 children live-born in Sweden from 2006 to 2012. Exposure groups defined by maternal ATD use in early pregnancy were MMI (n?=?162); PTU (n?=?218); MMI and PTU (n?=?66); ATD before or after, but not in pregnancy (n?=?1551) and non-exposed (never ATD (n?=?682 343)). Outcome was cumulative incidence of birth defects diagnosed before two years of age.
The cumulative incidence of birth defects was not significantly different in children exposed to MMI (6.8%, P?=?0.6) or PTU (6.4%, P?=?0.4) vs non-exposed (8.0%). For subtypes of birth defects, MMI was associated with an increased incidence of septal heart defects (P?=?0.02). PTU was associated with ear (P?=?0.005) and obstructive urinary system malformations (P?=?0.006). A case of choanal atresia was observed after exposure to both MMI and PTU. The incidence of birth defects in children born to mothers who received ATD before or after, but not in pregnancy, was 8.8% and not significantly different from non-exposed (P?=?0.3), MMI exposed (P?=?0.4) or PTU exposed (P?=?0.2).
MMI and PTU were associated with subtypes of birth defects previously reported, but the frequency of ATD exposure in early pregnancy was low and severe malformations described in the MMI embryopathy were rarely observed.
PubMed ID
28780518 View in PubMed
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BMD improvements after operation for primary hyperparathyroidism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119158
Source
Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2013 Jan;398(1):113-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Lars Rolighed
Peter Vestergaard
Lene Heickendorff
Tanja Sikjaer
Lars Rejnmark
Leif Mosekilde
Peer Christiansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Tage-Hansens Gade 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. larsrolighed@gmail.com
Source
Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2013 Jan;398(1):113-20
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Calcium - blood
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - blood
Denmark
Female
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary - blood - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Parathyroidectomy
Postoperative Complications - blood - diagnosis
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to quantify bone mineral density (BMD) changes following surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and to assess their relationship with clinical and biochemical variables.
A historic cohort of 236 PHPT patients with DXA scans pre- and 1-year postoperatively, clinical data, and biochemical data was analyzed.
The mean age was 60 years (range 19-86) and 81 % of the patients were women. A significant postoperative 2.6 % (95 % CI, 2.1; 3.1) increase in lumbar spine BMD was seen. The increase in BMD was positively associated with preoperative plasma PTH (p?=?0.002), Ca(2+) (p?
PubMed ID
23132462 View in PubMed
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Bone and vitamin D status in patients with anorexia nervosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264626
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Nov;61(11):A4940
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Stine Aistrup Eriksen
Hanne Prietzel
Jenna Rosenqvist Ibsen
Marlene Briciet Lauritsen
Peter Vestergaard
Gry Kjaersdam Telléus
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Nov;61(11):A4940
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - blood - physiopathology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Density - physiology
Calcium - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Hip - radiography
Humans
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Male
Malnutrition - physiopathology
Osteogenesis - physiology
Time Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate bone status and biological mechanisms involved in the negative impact of anorexia nervosa (AN) on osteogenesis.
A total of 30 AN patients from Aalborg University Hospital who underwent bone scans were included in a cross-sectional study. Biochemical data, bone scans (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) as well as general health and medical information had been collected during the 2009-2011 period and stored via local and national clinical databases in Denmark, and from these databases we identified all patients with an AN diagnosis who underwent bone scans.
AN patients had a mean Z-score of -1.5 to -1.6 in lumbar spine and total hip, respectively. The hip Z-score decreased with duration of disease, and a positive correlation was seen between serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D level and spine Z-score but not hip Z-score. Bone mineral density did not seem to change with time since diagnosis. Additionally, a negative correlation between serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels and serum total alkaline phosphatase levels was found. A serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D level below 50 nmol/l was associated with increased alkaline phosphatase levels.
Rather than clinical measures including BMI and biochemical measures disease duration was the main predictor of bone status. This implies that long-term disease should be a main factor in selecting patients for referral to DXA. Moreover, results from this study indicate normal osteoblastic response to malnutrition.
not relevant.
The present study was not registered due to its register-based design. However, the study was approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency.
PubMed ID
25370958 View in PubMed
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Caffeine and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17161
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Lars Frost
Peter Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Lars.Frost@as.aaa.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology - etiology
Cacao - chemistry
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Coffee - chemistry
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea - chemistry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the consumption of caffeine is associated with excess risk of atrial fibrillation. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in association with daily consumption of caffeine from coffee, tea, cola, cocoa, and chocolate. DESIGN: We prospectively examined the association between the amount of caffeine consumed per day and the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (x age: 56 y) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Subjects were followed in the Danish National Registry of Patients and in the Danish Civil Registration System. The consumption of caffeine was analyzed by quintiles with Cox proportional-hazard models. RESULTS: During follow-up (x: 5.7 y), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 555 subjects (373 men and 182 women). When the lowest quintile of caffeine consumption was used as a reference, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% CIs) in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.12 (0.87, 1.44), 0.85 (0.65, 1.12), 0.92 (0.71, 1.20), and 0.91 (0.70, 1.19), respectively. CONCLUSION: Consumption of caffeine was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):539-4015755819
PubMed ID
15755825 View in PubMed
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Changes in mortality patterns following total hip or knee arthroplasty over the past two decades: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105035
Source
Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014 Feb;66(2):311-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Arief Lalmohamed
Peter Vestergaard
Anthonius de Boer
Hubertus G M Leufkens
Tjeerd P van Staa
Frank de Vries
Author Affiliation
Utrecht University and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Source
Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014 Feb;66(2):311-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - surgery
Pneumonia - mortality
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - mortality
Venous Thromboembolism - mortality
Abstract
Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are effective procedures for patients with moderate-to-severe osteoarthritis. Mortality rates after THA and TKA may have changed because of new surgical techniques, improvement of peri- and postoperative care, and performance of surgery in older patients having multiple comorbidities. However, data on secular mortality trends are scarce. We undertook this study to evaluate mortality patterns between 1989 and 2007 in patients undergoing elective THA and TKA.
In a Danish retrospective nationwide cohort study, 71,812 patients who underwent THA and 40,642 patients who underwent TKA were identified between January 1989 and December 2007. All-cause and disease-specific mortality was assessed, stratified by calendar periods. Using Cox proportional hazards models, relative risks (RRs) of mortality were calculated between different calendar periods, adjusted for age, sex, and comorbid diseases.
Since the early 1990s, short-term survival following elective THA and TKA has greatly improved. Compared with the period between 1989 and 1991, 60-day mortality rates between 2004 and 2007 were substantially lower for patients undergoing THA (RR 0.40, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.28-0.58) and for patients undergoing TKA (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.21-0.67). This trend was far superior to what was seen in the general population. The decrease in mortality was greatest for deaths from myocardial infarction, venous thromboembolism, pneumonia, and stroke. Patients tended to have more presurgical comorbidity over time, and the duration of hospital stay was roughly halved.
Mortality rates following elective THA and TKA have decreased substantially since the early 1990s, despite patients having more presurgical comorbidity. These findings are reassuring for patients undergoing elective THA or TKA.
Notes
Comment In: Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014 Feb;66(2):250-324504796
PubMed ID
24504803 View in PubMed
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Clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are common among elderly people in Nuuk, Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117181
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:19596
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna Jakobsen
Peter Laurberg
Peter Vestergaard
Stig Andersen
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Centre, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. ajakobsen87@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:19596
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Calcium
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Vitamin D
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a debilitating condition characterized by fractures, pain and premature death. Risk factors for osteoporosis predict the risk of fragility fractures.
To describe the occurrence of risk factors for osteoporosis among populations in Nuuk, the capital of Greenland.
A random sample of women born in 1934-42, 1945-47, 1956, and men born in 1956 were selected from the national civil registry. A questionnaire was sent out in Greenlandic and Danish on risk factors for osteoporosis: family history, smoking habits, alcohol intake, presence of disease, sun exposure, intake of dairy products, age at menopause (women) and number of falls. Additional questions included the frequency of back pain, previous fractures, intake of vitamin D and calcium supplements, use of anti-osteoporotic drugs, steroids and other drugs.
The questionnaire was sent to 317 subjects confirmed to be living at an address in Nuuk and 181 (57.1%) responded. More young women than older women were smokers (60.6% vs. 35.0%; p=0.022) while limited sun exposure was reported by more of the old women (37.2% vs. 5.6%; p=0.003). Family history of osteoporosis was reported by 15.0%, without difference between groups. Alcohol and milk intake did not differ between groups. Premature menopause was reported by 17.9% of the women. Falls within the last year were reported by 42.4% with fewer falls in the oldest age group (21.9% vs. 50.0%; p=0.005). Frequency of fragility fractures increased with age (5.7% vs. 24.3% vs. 30.4%; p=0.02) and the risk of a fragility fracture increased with age (p=0.004; OR, 95% CI: 4.5, 1.6-12.2, reference: below 70 years), when adjusted for smoking, gender and falls. The use of anti-osteoporotic drugs was low (3.4%) while 28.8% took calcium and vitamin D supplements.
Age is a dominating risk factor for fragility fractures in Greenland. The use of anti-osteoporotic drugs is low in Greenland, even if osteoporotic fractures are common in old age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23326764 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.