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The Danish political twin study: political traits in Danish twins and the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122704
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2012 Feb;15(1):74-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Robert Klemmensen
Sara B Hobolt
Peter T Dinesen
Axel Skytthe
Asbjørn Sonne Nørgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Political Science, University of Southern Denmark.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2012 Feb;15(1):74-8
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Denmark
Female
Genetics, Behavioral
Humans
Male
Politics
Questionnaires
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
We compare a recent Danish twin survey on political attitudes and behaviors to a nationally representative survey covering similar topics. We find very similar means and variances for most of our constructed scales of political attitudes and behaviors in the two surveys, although even small differences tend to be statistically significant due to sample size. This suggests that the twin study can be used to make inferences on the heritability of several political traits in the Danish population.
PubMed ID
22784456 View in PubMed
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Daylight Savings Time Transitions and the Incidence Rate of Unipolar Depressive Episodes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289978
Source
Epidemiology. 2017 05; 28(3):346-353
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2017
Author
Bertel T Hansen
Kim M Sønderskov
Ida Hageman
Peter T Dinesen
Søren D Østergaard
Author Affiliation
From the aDepartment of Political Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; bDepartment of Political Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; cDepartment of Political Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; dPsychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; eDepartment of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; and fPsychosis Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiology. 2017 05; 28(3):346-353
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Registries
Seasons
Time
Abstract
Daylight savings time transitions affect approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. Prior studies have documented associations between daylight savings time transitions and adverse health outcomes, but it remains unknown whether they also cause an increase in the incidence rate of depressive episodes. This seems likely because daylight savings time transitions affect circadian rhythms, which are implicated in the etiology of depressive disorder. Therefore, we investigated the effects of daylight savings time transitions on the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes.
Using time series intervention analysis of nationwide data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register from 1995 to 2012, we compared the observed trend in the incidence rate of hospital contacts for unipolar depressive episodes after the transitions to and from summer time to the predicted trend in the incidence rate.
The analyses were based on 185,419 hospital contacts for unipolar depression and showed that the transition from summer time to standard time were associated with an 11% increase (95% CI = 7%, 15%) in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes that dissipated over approximately 10 weeks. The transition from standard time to summer time was not associated with a parallel change in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes.
This study shows that the transition from summer time to standard time was associated with an increase in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. Distress associated with the sudden advancement of sunset, marking the coming of a long period of short days, may explain this finding. See video abstract at, http://links.lww.com/EDE/B179.
Notes
CommentIn: BMJ. 2016 Oct 31;355:i5857 PMID 27803014
PubMed ID
27775953 View in PubMed
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Increased Incidence Rate of Trauma- and Stressor-related Disorders in Denmark After the Breivik Attacks in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292249
Source
Epidemiology. 2017 11; 28(6):906-909
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2017
Author
Bertel T Hansen
Peter T Dinesen
Søren D Østergaard
Author Affiliation
From the aDepartment of Political Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; bDepartment of Political Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; cDepartment of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; and dPsychosis Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiology. 2017 11; 28(6):906-909
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Norway
Psychological Trauma - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
September 11 Terrorist Attacks - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Terrorism - psychology
United States
Abstract
On 22 July 2011, Anders Breivik killed 77 adults and children in Norway. Having recently documented increases in the incidence of trauma- and stressor-related disorders in Denmark after the 9/11 attacks, we hypothesized that the Breivik attacks-due to their geographic proximity-would be followed by even larger increases in Denmark.
Using population-based data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register (1995-2012), we conducted an intervention analysis of the change in the incidence of trauma- and stressor-related disorders after the Breivik attacks.
The incidence rate increased by 16% over the following 1½ years after the Breivik attacks, corresponding to 2736 additional cases. In comparison, 9/11 was followed by a 4% increase. We also present evidence of a subsequent surge in incidence stimulated by media attention.
This study bolsters previous findings on extra-national consequences of terrorism and indicates that geographic proximity and media coverage may exacerbate effects.
PubMed ID
28708757 View in PubMed
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