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Aerobic fitness in late adolescence and the risk of early death: a prospective cohort study of 1.3 million Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288108
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 08;45(4):1159-1168
Publication Type
Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Gabriel Högström
Anna Nordström
Peter Nordström
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 08;45(4):1159-1168
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Muscle strength
Obesity - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Fitness level and obesity have been associated with death in older populations. We investigated the relationship between aerobic fitness in late adolescence and early death, and whether a high fitness level can compensate the risk of being obese.
The cohort comprised 1 317 713 Swedish men (mean age, 18 years) that conscripted between 1969 and 1996. Aerobic fitness was assessed by an electrically braked cycle test. All-cause and specific causes of death were tracked using national registers. Multivariable adjusted associations were tested using Cox regression models.
During a mean follow-up period of 29 years, 44 301 subjects died. Individuals in the highest fifth of aerobic fitness were at lower risk of death from any cause [hazard ratio (HR), 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47-0.51] in comparison with individuals in the lowest fifth, with the strongest association seen for death related to alcohol and narcotics abuse (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.15-0.26). Similar risks were found for weight-adjusted aerobic fitness. Aerobic fitness was associated with a reduced risk of death from any cause in normal-weight and overweight individuals, whereas the benefits were reduced in obese individuals (P
PubMed ID
26686843 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use and mortality in very old people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271085
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2016 Mar 18;:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-18-2016
Author
Gustaf Boström
Carl Hörnsten
Jon Brännström
Mia Conradsson
Peter Nordström
Per Allard
Yngve Gustafson
Håkan Littbrand
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2016 Mar 18;:1-10
Date
Mar-18-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Antidepressant treatment may increase the risk of death. The association between antidepressants and mortality has been evaluated in community-dwelling older people, but not in representative samples of very old people, among whom dementia, multimorbidity, and disability are common.
Umeå 85+/GERDA study participants (n = 992) aged 85, 90, and =95 years were followed for up to five years. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze mortality risk associated with baseline antidepressant treatment, adjusted for potential confounders.
Mean age was 89 years; 27% of participants had dementia, 20% had stroke histories, 29% had heart failure, and 16% used antidepressants. In age- and sex-adjusted analyses, antidepressant use was associated with a 76% increased mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-2.19). Adding adjustment for Geriatric Depression Scale score, HR was 1.62 (95% CI, 1.29-2.03). The association was not significant when adjusting for additional confounding factors (HR = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.85-1.38). Interaction analyses in the fully adjusted model revealed a significant interaction between sex and antidepressant use (HR: 1.76; 95% CI, 1.05-2.94). Among male and female antidepressant users, the HRs for death were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.47-1.24) and 1.28 (95% CI, 0.97-1.70), respectively.
Among very old people, baseline antidepressant treatment does not seem to be independently associated with increased mortality risk. However, the risk may be different in men and women. This difference and the potential risk of initial treatment require further investigation in future cohort studies of very old people.
PubMed ID
26987958 View in PubMed
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Association between hematocrit in late adolescence and subsequent myocardial infarction in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113370
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 9;168(4):3588-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2013
Author
Fredrik Toss
Anna Nordström
Peter Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Sweden; Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Sweden; Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Sweden. Electronic address: fredrik.toss@idrott.umu.se.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 9;168(4):3588-93
Date
Oct-9-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Hematocrit - methods - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Hematocrit is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk in middle and old age, but whether hematocrit is also a predictor at younger ages is presently not known. In this study, we examined whether hematocrit measured in adolescence was associated with the risk of myocardial infarction later in life.
During Swedish national conscription tests conducted between 1969 and 1978, the hematocrit was measured in 417,099 young Swedish men. The cohort was followed for subsequent myocardial infarction events through December 2010. Associations between hematocrit and myocardial infarction were accessed using Cox regression models.
During a median follow-up period of 36 years, 9322 first-time myocardial infarctions occurred within the study cohort. After adjusting for relevant confounders and potential risk factors for myocardial infarction, men with a hematocrit=49% had a 1.4-fold increased risk of myocardial infarction compared with men with a hematocrit=44%. This relationship was dose dependent (p
PubMed ID
23735337 View in PubMed
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The association of depression with subsequent dementia diagnosis: A Swedish nationwide cohort study from 1964 to 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307381
Source
PLoS Med. 2020 01; 17(1):e1003016
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
01-2020
Author
Sofie Holmquist
Anna Nordström
Peter Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
PLoS Med. 2020 01; 17(1):e1003016
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Depression is associated with an increased risk of dementia. However, short follow-up times and lack of adjustment for familial factors in previous studies could influence this association. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between depression and subsequent dementia, while controlling for familial factors and with a follow-up of over 35 years.
Two cohorts were formed from all individuals aged 50 years or older living in Sweden as of 31 December 2005 (n = 3,341,010). The Swedish National Patient Register was searched from 1964 through 2016 to identify diagnosis of depression and dementia. In the first cohort, individuals diagnosed with depression (n = 119,386) were matched 1:1 with controls without depression diagnosis. The second cohort was a sibling cohort (n = 50,644) consisting of same-sex full sibling pairs with discordant depression status. In the population matched cohort study, a total of 9,802 individuals were diagnosed with dementia during a mean follow-up time of 10.41 (range 0-35) years (5.5% of those diagnosed with depression and 2.6% of those without depression diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.47, 95% CI 2.35-2.58; p
PubMed ID
31917808 View in PubMed
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Associations of Light, Moderate to Vigorous, and Total Physical Activity With the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in 4,652 Community-Dwelling 70-Year-Olds: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303763
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2021 Jan 07; :1-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-07-2021
Author
Marcel Ballin
Peter Nordström
Anna Nordström
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2021 Jan 07; :1-9
Date
Jan-07-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In this cross-sectional study, the authors investigated the associations of objectively measured physical activity (PA) with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in older adults. Accelerometer-derived light-intensity PA, moderate to vigorous PA, and steps per day were measured in (N = 4,652) 70-year-olds in Umeå, Sweden, during May 2012-November 2019. The MetS was assessed according to the American Heart Association/ National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute criteria. The prevalence of MetS was 49.3%. Compared with the reference, the odds ratios for MetS in increasing quartiles of light-intensity PA were 0.91 (0.77-1.09), 0.75 (0.62-0.89), and 0.66 (0.54-0.80). For moderate to vigorous PA, the corresponding odds ratios were 0.79 (0.66-0.94), 0.67 (0.56-0.80), and 0.56 (0.46-0.67). For steps per day, the odds ratios were 0.65 (0.55-0.78), 0.55 (0.46-0.65), and 0.45 (0.36-0.55). In summary, this study shows that greater amounts of PA, regardless of intensity, are associated with lower odds of MetS. With the limitation of being an observational study, these findings may have implications for the prevention of MetS in older adults.
PubMed ID
33412513 View in PubMed
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Associations of Visceral Adipose Tissue and Skeletal Muscle Density With Incident Stroke, Myocardial Infarction, and All-Cause Mortality in Community-Dwelling 70-Year-Old Individuals: A Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311670
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2021 May 04; 10(9):e020065
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-04-2021
Author
Marcel Ballin
Peter Nordström
Johan Niklasson
Anna Nordström
Author Affiliation
Unit of Geriatric Medicine Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation Umeå University Umeå Sweden.
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2021 May 04; 10(9):e020065
Date
May-04-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Background Aging leads to increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and reduced skeletal muscle density. To which extent these are associated with the risk of stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and all-cause mortality in older adults is unknown. Methods and Results A total of 3294 70-year-old individuals (49.6% women) underwent a health examination in Umeå, Sweden, during 2012 to 2018. VAT and muscle density were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Cases of stroke, MI, and all-cause mortality were collected through national registers. Cox regressions were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs per SD greater VAT and per SD lower muscle density. During a mean follow-up of 3.6 years, there were 108 cases of stroke or MI, and 97 deaths. Greater VAT (adjusted HR [aHR], 1.56; 95% CI, 1.09-2.22), but not lower muscle density (aHR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.97-1.34), was associated with increased risk of stroke or MI. Neither VAT (aHR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.65-1.41) nor muscle density (aHR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.92-1.34) was associated with all-cause mortality. The association of VAT with stroke or MI was only significant in men (aHR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.19-2.91) but not women (aHR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.25-1.42) (Pinteraction=0.038). Conclusions With the limitation of being an observational study, these findings suggest that VAT is an important obesity-related predictor of cardiovascular risk in 70-year-old men, and by implication, that decreasing VAT may potentially reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
33870709 View in PubMed
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Blood Pressure, Gait Speed, and Mortality in Very Old Individuals: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258467
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2014 Oct 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-22-2014
Author
Bodil Weidung
Gustaf Boström
Annika Toots
Peter Nordström
Bo Carlberg
Yngve Gustafson
Håkan Littbrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: bodil.weidung@umu.se.
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2014 Oct 22;
Date
Oct-22-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Clinical trials and observational studies have produced contradictory results regarding the association of blood pressure (BP) and mortality in people aged 80 years or older. Gait speed at usual pace has been shown to moderate this association in a population of noninstitutionalized people aged 65 years or older. The aims of this study were to investigate the association of BP with all-cause mortality in a representative sample of people aged 85 years or older and to assess whether gait speed moderates this association.
A total of 806 participants in the population-based prospective Umeå 85+/GERDA study aged 85, 90, and 95 years or older.
Gait speed at usual pace was measured over 2.4 m. The main outcome was hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality according to systolic and diastolic BP categories in the total sample and in faster-walking (=0.5 m/s, n = 312) and slower-walking (
PubMed ID
25441098 View in PubMed
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Body composition and mortality risk in later life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122413
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Sep;41(5):677-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Fredrik Toss
Peder Wiklund
Peter Nordström
Anna Nordström
Author Affiliation
Sports Medicine - Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå, Sweden. fredrik.toss@idrott.umu.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Sep;41(5):677-81
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality - trends
Obesity - complications - mortality
Overweight - complications - mortality
Risk factors
Abstract
body mass index is used widely to define overweight and obesity. Both high and low body mass indices are associated with increased mortality risk during middle age, but the relationship is less clear in later life. Thus, studies on the relationships between other aspects of body composition and mortality among older subjects are needed.
to investigate associations between different aspects of body composition and mortality in older people.
the study population comprised 921 participants aged =65 years who underwent dual-energy X-ray (DXA) absorptiometric examination at the Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University. The main reason for admission was clinical suspicion of osteoporosis. Total, abdominal and gynoid fat masses and lean body mass were measured by DXA absorptiometry at baseline, and the cohort was followed (mean duration, 9.2 years) for mortality events.
during follow-up, 397 participants died. Lean mass was associated negatively with mortality in men and women (P
PubMed ID
22820447 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular Disease and All-Cause Mortality in Male Twins With Discordant Cardiorespiratory Fitness: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306268
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2020 10 01; 189(10):1114-1123
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
10-01-2020
Author
Marcel Ballin
Anna Nordström
Peter Nordström
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2020 10 01; 189(10):1114-1123
Date
10-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Whether genetic and familial factors influence the association between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is unknown. Two cohorts were formed based on data from 1,212,295 men aged 18 years who were conscripted for military service in Sweden during 1972-1996. The first comprised 4,260 twin pairs in which the twins in each pair had different CRF (=1 watt). The second comprised 90,331 nonsibling pairs with different CRF and matched on birth year and year of conscription. Incident CVD and all-cause mortality were identified using national registers. During follow-up (median 32 years), there was no difference in CVD and mortality between fitter twins and less fit twins (246 vs. 251 events; hazard ratio (HR) = 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83, 1.20). The risks were similar in twin pairs with =60-watt difference in CRF (HR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.57, 1.64). In contrast, in the nonsibling cohort, fitter men had a lower risk of the outcomes than less fit men (4,444 vs. 5,298 events; HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.86). The association was stronger in pairs with =60-watt difference in CRF (HR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.71). These findings indicate that genetic and familial factors influence the association of CRF with CVD and mortality.
PubMed ID
32286630 View in PubMed
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Cognitive function and other risk factors for mild traumatic brain injury in young men: nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115650
Source
BMJ. 2013;346:f723
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna Nordström
Benoni B Edin
Sara Lindström
Peter Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. anna.nordstrom@idrott.umu.se
Source
BMJ. 2013;346:f723
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications
Algorithms
Brain Injuries - complications - diagnosis
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Mild Cognitive Impairment - diagnosis - etiology
Military Medicine
Military Personnel
Neuropsychological Tests
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Social Class
Sweden
Twin Studies as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate cognitive function and other risk factors for mild traumatic brain injury in young men.
Nationwide prospective cohort study.
Sweden.
305?885 men conscripted for military service from 1989 to 1994.
mild traumatic brain injuries in relation to cognitive function and other potential risk factors assessed at conscription and follow-up.
Men with one mild traumatic brain injury within two years before (n=1988) or after cognitive testing (n=2214) had about 5.5% lower overall cognitive function scores than did men with no mild traumatic brain injury during follow up (P
Notes
Comment In: J Neurol. 2013 Oct;260(10):2691-324052117
Comment In: BMJ. 2013;346:f152223482938
PubMed ID
23482939 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.