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Effect of anaerobiosis on indigenous microorganisms in blackwater with fish offal as co-substrate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267101
Source
Water Res. 2014 Oct 15;63:1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2014
Author
Ragnhildur Gunnarsdóttir
Stefan Heiske
Pernille Erland Jensen
Jens Ejbye Schmidt
Arne Villumsen
Petter Deinboll Jenssen
Source
Water Res. 2014 Oct 15;63:1-9
Date
Oct-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Anaerobiosis
Animals
Arctic Regions
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena
Bioreactors
Decapoda (Crustacea)
Escherichia coli - physiology
Feces - microbiology
Fisheries
Flounder
Greenland
Industrial Waste - analysis
Methane - biosynthesis
Refuse Disposal - methods
Sewage - analysis
Streptococcus - physiology
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the effect of mesophilic anaerobic digestion with aerobic storage on the survival of selected indigenous microorganisms and microbial groups in blackwater, including the effect of addition of Greenlandic Halibut and shrimp offal. The methane yield of the different substrate mixtures was determined in batch experiments to study possible correlation between methanogenic activity in the anaerobic digesters and reduction of indigenous microorganisms in the blackwater. By the end of the experiments a recovery study was conducted to determine possible injury of the microorganisms. In both anaerobic and aerobic samples, survival of Escherichia coli was better in the presence of Greenlandic Halibut offal when compared to samples containing blackwater only and blackwater and shrimp offal, possibly due to more available carbon in the samples containing Greenlandic Halibut offal. Reduction of faecal streptococci was large under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions, and the results indicated a complete removal of faecal streptococci in the anaerobic samples containing blackwater and a mixture of blackwater and shrimp offal after 17 and 31 days, respectively. Amoxicillin resistant bacteria were reduced in the anaerobic samples in the beginning of the study but increased towards the end of it. The opposite pattern was observed in the aerobic samples, with a growth in the beginning followed by a reduction. During the anaerobic digestion tetracycline resistant bacteria showed the least reduction in the mixture of blackwater and shrimp offal, which had the lowest methane yield while the highest reduction was observed in the mixture of blackwater and Greenlandic Halibut, where the highest methane yield was measured Reduction of coliphages was larger under anaerobic conditions. Addition of fish offal had no effect on survival of coliphages. The results of the recovery study indicated that a fraction of the E. coli in the aerobic blackwater sample and of the faecal streptococci in both the anaerobic and aerobic samples containing blackwater and Greenlandic Halibut were injured only, and thus able to resuscitate during recovery. The use of anaerobic digestion in the Arctic is limited to substrate types like those tested in this study because of absence of agriculture. The results indicate that anaerobic digestion of wastewater could benefit from the addition of fish offal, with respect to both microbial reduction and energy production.
PubMed ID
24971812 View in PubMed
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Screening of heavy metal containing waste types for use as raw material in Arctic clay-based bricks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277589
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Nov 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2016
Author
Louise Josefine Belmonte
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Gunvor Marie Kirkelund
Pernille Erland Jensen
Andreas Peter Vestbø
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Nov 10;
Date
Nov-10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In the vulnerable Arctic environment, the impact of especially hazardous wastes can have severe consequences and the reduction and safe handling of these waste types are therefore an important issue. In this study, two groups of heavy metal containing particulate waste materials, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly and bottom ashes and mine tailings (i.e., residues from the mineral resource industry) from Greenland were screened in order to determine their suitability as secondary resources in clay-based brick production. Small clay discs, containing 20 or 40% of the different particulate waste materials, were fired and material properties and heavy metal leaching tests were conducted before and after firing. Remediation techniques (washing in distilled water and electrodialytical treatment) applied to the fly ash reduced leaching before firing. The mine tailings and bottom ash brick discs obtained satisfactory densities (1669-2007 kg/m(3)) and open porosities (27.9-39.9%). In contrast, the fly ash brick discs had low densities (1313-1578 kg/m(3)) and high open porosities (42.1-51. %). However, leaching tests on crushed brick discs revealed that heavy metals generally became more available after firing for all the investigated materials and that further optimisation is therefore necessary prior to incorporation in bricks.
PubMed ID
27832436 View in PubMed
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Screening of heavy metal containing waste types for use as raw material in Arctic clay-based bricks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297774
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32831-32843
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Louise Josefine Belmonte
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Gunvor Marie Kirkelund
Pernille Erland Jensen
Andreas Peter Vestbø
Author Affiliation
Arctic Technology Centre, DTU Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32831-32843
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Clay - chemistry
Coal Ash - analysis - chemistry
Construction Materials - analysis
Greenland
Incineration
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Mining
Refuse Disposal - methods
Solid Waste - analysis
Water - chemistry
Abstract
In the vulnerable Arctic environment, the impact of especially hazardous wastes can have severe consequences and the reduction and safe handling of these waste types are therefore an important issue. In this study, two groups of heavy metal containing particulate waste materials, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly and bottom ashes and mine tailings (i.e., residues from the mineral resource industry) from Greenland were screened in order to determine their suitability as secondary resources in clay-based brick production. Small clay discs, containing 20 or 40% of the different particulate waste materials, were fired and material properties and heavy metal leaching tests were conducted before and after firing. Remediation techniques (washing in distilled water and electrodialytical treatment) applied to the fly ash reduced leaching before firing. The mine tailings and bottom ash brick discs obtained satisfactory densities (1669-2007 kg/m3) and open porosities (27.9-39.9%). In contrast, the fly ash brick discs had low densities (1313-1578 kg/m3) and high open porosities (42.1-51. %). However, leaching tests on crushed brick discs revealed that heavy metals generally became more available after firing for all the investigated materials and that further optimisation is therefore necessary prior to incorporation in bricks.
PubMed ID
27832436 View in PubMed
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Treatment of Arctic wastewater by chemical coagulation, UV and peracetic acid disinfection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280342
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Feb 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2017
Author
Ravi Kumar Chhetri
Ewa Klupsch
Henrik Rasmus Andersen
Pernille Erland Jensen
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Feb 16;
Date
Feb-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Conventional wastewater treatment is challenging in the Arctic region due to the cold climate and scattered population. Thus, no wastewater treatment plant exists in Greenland, and raw wastewater is discharged directly to nearby waterbodies without treatment. We investigated the efficiency of physicochemical wastewater treatment, in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Raw wastewater from Kangerlussuaq was treated by chemical coagulation and UV disinfection. By applying 7.5 mg Al/L polyaluminium chloride (PAX XL100), 73% of turbidity and 28% phosphate was removed from raw wastewater. E. coli and Enterococcus were removed by 4 and 2.5 log, respectively, when UV irradiation of 0.70 kWh/m(3) was applied to coagulated wastewater. Furthermore, coagulated raw wastewater in Denmark, which has a chemical quality similar to Greenlandic wastewater, was disinfected by peracetic acid or UV irradiation. Removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 6 and 12 mg/L peracetic acid was 2.8 and 3.1 log, respectively. Similarly, removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 0.21 and 2.10 kWh/m(3) for UV irradiation was 2.1 and greater than 4 log, respectively. Physicochemical treatment of raw wastewater followed by UV irradiation and/or peracetic acid disinfection showed the potential for treatment of arctic wastewater.
PubMed ID
28210951 View in PubMed
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Treatment of Arctic wastewater by chemical coagulation, UV and peracetic acid disinfection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297769
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32851-32859
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Ravi Kumar Chhetri
Ewa Klupsch
Henrik Rasmus Andersen
Pernille Erland Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet, Building 115, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32851-32859
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - drug effects - radiation effects
Denmark
Disinfectants - chemistry - pharmacology
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus - drug effects - radiation effects
Escherichia coli - drug effects - radiation effects
Greenland
Heterotrophic Processes
Peracetic Acid - chemistry - pharmacology
Ultraviolet Rays
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Conventional wastewater treatment is challenging in the Arctic region due to the cold climate and scattered population. Thus, no wastewater treatment plant exists in Greenland, and raw wastewater is discharged directly to nearby waterbodies without treatment. We investigated the efficiency of physicochemical wastewater treatment, in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Raw wastewater from Kangerlussuaq was treated by chemical coagulation and UV disinfection. By applying 7.5 mg Al/L polyaluminium chloride (PAX XL100), 73% of turbidity and 28% phosphate was removed from raw wastewater. E. coli and Enterococcus were removed by 4 and 2.5 log, respectively, when UV irradiation of 0.70 kWh/m3 was applied to coagulated wastewater. Furthermore, coagulated raw wastewater in Denmark, which has a chemical quality similar to Greenlandic wastewater, was disinfected by peracetic acid or UV irradiation. Removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 6 and 12 mg/L peracetic acid was 2.8 and 3.1 log, respectively. Similarly, removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 0.21 and 2.10 kWh/m3 for UV irradiation was 2.1 and greater than 4 log, respectively. Physicochemical treatment of raw wastewater followed by UV irradiation and/or peracetic acid disinfection showed the potential for treatment of arctic wastewater.
PubMed ID
28210951 View in PubMed
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Water, sanitation, pollution, and health in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295549
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32827-32830
Publication Type
Editorial
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Pernille Erland Jensen
Thomas W Hennessy
Roland Kallenborn
Author Affiliation
Arctic technology Centre, Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. pej@byg.dtu.dk.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32827-32830
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Editorial
Notes
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PubMed ID
30362032 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.