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Applying multivariate analysis as decision tool for evaluating sediment-specific remediation strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270570
Source
Chemosphere. 2016 May;151:59-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Kristine B Pedersen
Tore Lejon
Pernille E Jensen
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Source
Chemosphere. 2016 May;151:59-67
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Multivariate methodology was employed for finding optimum remediation conditions for electrodialytic remediation of harbour sediment from an Arctic location in Norway. The parts of the experimental domain in which both sediment- and technology-specific remediation objectives were met were identified. Objectives targeted were removal of the sediment-specific pollutants Cu and Pb, while minimising the effect on the sediment matrix by limiting the removal of naturally occurring metals while maintaining low energy consumption. Two different cell designs for electrochemical remediation were tested and final concentrations of Cu and Pb were below background levels in large parts of the experimental domain when operating at low current densities (
PubMed ID
26928331 View in PubMed
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Degradation of oil products in a soil from a Russian Barents hot-spot during electrodialytic remediation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271253
Source
Springerplus. 2016;5:168
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Kristine B Pedersen
Tore Lejon
Pernille E Jensen
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Source
Springerplus. 2016;5:168
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A highly oil-polluted soil from Krasnoe in North-West Russia was used to investigate the degradation of organic pollutants during electrodialytic remediation. Removal efficiencies were up to 70 % for total hydrocarbons (THC) and up to 65 % for polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Relatively more of the lighter PAH compounds and THC fractions were degraded. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a difference in the distribution of PAH compounds after the remediation. The observed clustering of experiments in the PCA scores plot was assessed to be related to the stirring rate. Multivariate analysis of the experimental settings and final concentrations in the 12 experiments revealed that the stirring rate of the soil suspension was by far the most important parameter for the remediation for both THC and PAH. Light was the second most important variable for PAH and seems to influence degradation. The experimental variables current density and remediation time did not significantly influence the degradation of the organic pollutants. Despite current density not influencing the remediation, there is potential for degrading organic pollutants during electrodialytic removal of heavy metals, as long as a stirred set-up is applied. Depending on remediation objectives, further optimisation may be needed in order to develop efficient remediation strategies.
PubMed ID
27026865 View in PubMed
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Electrodialytic treatment of Greenlandic municipal solid waste incineration fly ash.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296048
Source
Waste Manag. 2018 Oct; 80:241-251
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Gunvor M Kirkelund
Pernille E Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby, Denmark. Electronic address: gunki@byg.dtu.dk.
Source
Waste Manag. 2018 Oct; 80:241-251
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Greenland, fly ash could contribute as a local resource in construction as a substitute for cement in concrete or clay in bricks, if the toxicity of the ash is reduced. In this study, fly ash from three different Greenlandic waste incinerators were collected and subjected to electrodialytic treatment for removal of heavy metals with the aim of enabling reuse of the fly ashes. Seven electrodialytic experiments treating up to 2.5?kg of fly ash in a 10?L suspension were made. The heavy metal removal was mostly dependent on the initial concentration in the fly ash. Heavy metal leaching was examined before and after treatment and revealed overall a significant reduction in leaching of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn; however, Cr and Pb leaching were above Danish guideline levels for reuse purposes. Hg leaching was also reduced to below Danish guideline levels, although only investigated for one fly ash. Hexavalent Cr was not the dominant speciation of Cr in the fly ashes. Ettringite formed during electrodialytic treatment in the fly ash suspensions at pH above 12. The total concentration of eligible components for reuse such as CaO, SiO2 and Al2O3, increased during the electrodialytic treatment.
PubMed ID
30455005 View in PubMed
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The influence of electrodialytic remediation on dioxin (PCDD/PCDF) levels in fly ash and air pollution control residues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277176
Source
Chemosphere. 2016 Apr;148:380-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Celia Dias-Ferreira
Gunvor M Kirkelund
Pernille E Jensen
Source
Chemosphere. 2016 Apr;148:380-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - analysis
Benzofurans - analysis
Coal Ash - analysis - chemistry
Construction Materials
Denmark
Electrochemical Techniques
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Restoration and Remediation - methods
Greenland
Incineration
Pilot Projects
Solid Waste - analysis
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Abstract
Fly ash and Air Pollution Control (APC) residues collected from three municipal solid waste incinerators in Denmark and Greenland were treated by electrodialytic remediation at pilot scale for 8-10 h. This work presents for the first time the effect of electrodialytic treatment on polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), and how these levels impact on the valorization options for fly ash and APC residue. PCDD/PCDF levels in the original residues ranged between 4.85 and 197 ng g(-1), being higher for the electrostatic precipitator fly ash. The toxic equivalent (TEQ) varied ten fold, ranging 0.18-2.0 ng g(-1) I-TEQ, with penta and hexa-homologs being most significant for toxicity. After the electrodialytic treatment PCDD/PCDF levels increased in the residues (between 1.4 and 2.0 times). This does not mean PCDD/PCDF were synthesized, but else that soluble materials dissolve, leaving behind the non-water soluble compounds, such as PCDD/PCDF. According to the Basel Convention, PCDD/PCDF levels in these materials is low (
PubMed ID
26826780 View in PubMed
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The influence of Magnafloc10 on the acidic, alkaline, and electrodialytic desorption of metals from mine tailings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295836
Source
J Environ Manage. 2018 Oct 15; 224:130-139
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-15-2018
Author
Kristine B Pedersen
Helena C Reinardy
Pernille E Jensen
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Juho Junttila
Marianne Frantzen
Author Affiliation
Akvaplan-niva AS, Fram Centre - High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment, Hjalmar Johansens Gate 14, 9007, Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: kristine.pedersen@akvaplan.niva.no.
Source
J Environ Manage. 2018 Oct 15; 224:130-139
Date
Oct-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Copper - chemistry - isolation & purification
Estuaries
Industrial Waste
Metals
Mining
Norway
Water Pollutants, Chemical - chemistry - isolation & purification
Water Purification
Abstract
Repparfjorden in northern Norway has been partly designated for submarine mine tailings disposal when the adjacent Cu mine re-opens in 2019. In order to increase sedimentation, the flocculant, Magnafloc10 is planned to be added to the mine tailings prior to discharge into the fjord. This study investigated the feasibility of reducing the Cu concentrations (375?mg/kg) in the mine tailings by applying electrodialytic extraction, including potential optimisation by adding Magnafloc10. In the acidic electrodialytic treatment (pH??12), Magnafloc10 reduced the extraction of Cu from 17% to 0.7%, due to the flocs remaining in the tailing slurries. The electric energy consumption per extracted Cu was similar in the acidic and alkaline electrodialytic treatments without the addition of Magnafloc10. In the alkaline electrodialytic treatment, the extraction of other metals was low (
PubMed ID
30036807 View in PubMed
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Long-term dispersion and availability of metals from submarine mine tailing disposal in a fjord in Arctic Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282905
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 May 27;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2017
Author
Kristine B Pedersen
Pernille E Jensen
Beata Sternal
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Mie Vesterskov Henning
Manja Marie Kudahl
Juho Junttila
Kari Skirbekk
Marianne Frantzen
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 May 27;
Date
May-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Mining of Cu took place in Kvalsund in the Arctic part of Norway in the 1970s, and mine tailings were discharged to the inner part of the fjord, Repparfjorden. Metal speciation analysis was used to assess the historical dispersion of metals as well as their potential bioavailability from the area of the mine tailing disposal. It was revealed that the dispersion of Ba, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn from the mine tailings has been limited. Dispersion of Cu to the outer fjord has, however, occurred; the amounts released and dispersed from the mine tailing disposal area quantified to be 2.5-10 t, less than 5% of Cu in the original mine tailings. An estimated 80-390 t of Cu still remains in the disposal area from the surface to a depth of 16 cm. Metal partitioning showed that 56-95% of the Cu is bound in the potential bioavailable fractions (exchangeable, reducible and oxidisable) of the sediments, totalling approximately 70-340 t, with potential for continuous release to the pore water and re-precipitation in over- and underlying sediments. Surface sediments in the deposit area were affected by elevated Cu concentrations just above the probable effect level according to the Norwegian sediment quality criteria, with 50-80% Cu bound in the exchangeable, reducible and oxidisable fractions, potentially available for release to the water column and/or for uptake in benthic organisms.
PubMed ID
28550634 View in PubMed
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Long-term dispersion and availability of metals from submarine mine tailing disposal in a fjord in Arctic Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297765
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32901-32912
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Kristine B Pedersen
Pernille E Jensen
Beata Sternal
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Mie Vesterskov Henning
Manja Marie Kudahl
Juho Junttila
Kari Skirbekk
Marianne Frantzen
Author Affiliation
Akvaplan-niva AS, Fram Centre-High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment, Hjalmar Johansens gate 14, 9007, Tromsø, Norway. kristine.pedersen@akvaplan.niva.no.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32901-32912
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biological Availability
Copper - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Environmental monitoring
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Metals - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Mining
Norway
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Mining of Cu took place in Kvalsund in the Arctic part of Norway in the 1970s, and mine tailings were discharged to the inner part of the fjord, Repparfjorden. Metal speciation analysis was used to assess the historical dispersion of metals as well as their potential bioavailability from the area of the mine tailing disposal. It was revealed that the dispersion of Ba, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn from the mine tailings has been limited. Dispersion of Cu to the outer fjord has, however, occurred; the amounts released and dispersed from the mine tailing disposal area quantified to be 2.5-10 t, less than 5% of Cu in the original mine tailings. An estimated 80-390 t of Cu still remains in the disposal area from the surface to a depth of 16 cm. Metal partitioning showed that 56-95% of the Cu is bound in the potential bioavailable fractions (exchangeable, reducible and oxidisable) of the sediments, totalling approximately 70-340 t, with potential for continuous release to the pore water and re-precipitation in over- and underlying sediments. Surface sediments in the deposit area were affected by elevated Cu concentrations just above the probable effect level according to the Norwegian sediment quality criteria, with 50-80% Cu bound in the exchangeable, reducible and oxidisable fractions, potentially available for release to the water column and/or for uptake in benthic organisms.
PubMed ID
28550634 View in PubMed
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Screening of Variable Importance for Optimsing Electrodialytic Remediation of Heavy Metals from Polluted Harbour Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261012
Source
Environ Technol. 2015 Mar 11;:1-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2015
Author
Kristine B Pedersen
Tore Lejon
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Pernille E Jensen
Source
Environ Technol. 2015 Mar 11;:1-32
Date
Mar-11-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Using multivariate design and modelling, optimal conditions for electrodialytic remediation (EDR) of heavy metals were determined for polluted harbour sediments from Hammerfest harbour located in the geographic Arctic region of Norway. The comparative importance of the variables; current density, remediation time, light/no light, the liquid-solid ratio and stirring rate of the sediment suspension were determined in 15 laboratory scale EDR experiments by projection to latent structures (PLS). The relation between the X matrix (experimental variables) and the Y matrix (removal efficiencies) was computed and variable importance in the projection was used to assess the influence of the experimental variables. Current density and remediation time proved to have the highest influence on the remediation of the heavy metals Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in the studied experimental domain. In addition it was shown that excluding the acidification time improved the PLS model, indicating the importance of applying a limited experimental domain that covers the removal phases of each heavy metal in the specific sediment. Based on PLS modelling the optimal conditions for remediating the Hammerfest sediment was determined; operating in the experimental domain of 0.5-0.8 mA/cm(2) and a remediation time after acidification of 450-570 hours met acceptable levels according to Norwegian sediment quality guidelines. TENT_1028470_Supplementary_File.zip.
PubMed ID
25760936 View in PubMed
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Simultaneous electrodialytic removal of PAH, PCB, TBT and heavy metals from sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282206
Source
J Environ Manage. 2017 Apr 28;198(Pt 1):192-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-2017
Author
Kristine B Pedersen
Tore Lejon
Pernille E Jensen
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Source
J Environ Manage. 2017 Apr 28;198(Pt 1):192-202
Date
Apr-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Contaminated sediments are remediated in order to protect human health and the environment, with the additional benefit of using the treated sediments for other activities. Common for many polluted sediments is the contamination with several different pollutants, making remediation challenging with the need of different remedial actions for each pollutant. In this study, electrodialytic remediation (EDR) of sediments was found effective for simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic pollutants for sediments from Arctic regions - Sisimiut in Greenland and Hammerfest in Norway. The influence of sediment properties and experimental settings on the remediation process was studied by employing multivariate analysis. The importance of the variables studied varied with the pollutant and based on these results it was possible to assess removal processes for the different pollutants. Desorption was found to be important for the removal of heavy metals and TBT, while photolysis was significant for removal of PAH, PCB and TBT. In addition, dechlorination was found to be important for the removal of PCB. The highest removal efficiencies were found for heavy metals, TBT and PCB (>40%) and lower removal efficiencies for PAH (
PubMed ID
28460326 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.