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Assessment of hypertensive patients' self-care agency after counseling training of nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279503
Source
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract. 2015 Nov;27(11):624-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Eva Drevenhorn
Ann Bengtson
Per Nyberg
Karin I Kjellgren
Source
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract. 2015 Nov;27(11):624-30
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Counseling
Female
Humans
Hypertension - nursing - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse practitioners
Nursing Process
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Patterns, Nurses'
Self Care
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess hypertensive patients' self-care agency and any correlation with the patient's lifestyle changes and the nurse's degree of patient centeredness after counseling training.
Nurses in the intervention group (IG; n = 19) working at nurse-led clinics at health centers were trained in patient centeredness (motivational interviewing) and the stages of change model and included 137 patients. Nurses in the control group (CG; n = 14) included 51 patients. The Exercise of Self-Care Agency (ESCA) instrument was used. There was a significant difference from baseline to the 2-year follow-up in the ESCA score (IG, p = .0001). An increase in ESCA score was correlated with an increased level of physical activity after 2 years (IG, p = .0001; CG, p = .040).
The counseling training gave an increase in the patients' self-care agency scores, which was significantly correlated with increased physical activity.
In clinical practice it is important for nurses to be patient centered in their counseling to affect patients' self-care agency in a positive direction.
PubMed ID
25731140 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about health and diabetes in men of different ethnic origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47078
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2005 Apr;50(1):47-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Katarina G Hjelm
Karin Bard
Per Nyberg
Jan Apelqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. katarina.hjelm@ivosa.vxu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2005 Apr;50(1):47-59
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arabia - ethnology
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - psychology
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Men
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Sweden
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
AIM: This paper reports the findings of a study exploring the health and illness beliefs of men with diabetes, who were from different cultural backgrounds and living in Sweden. BACKGROUND: No studies have been reported that have focused on the beliefs about health and illness in men with diabetes mellitus of different ethnic origin. Beliefs may affect self-care and care-seeking behaviour. METHOD: An explorative study design and purposive sampling procedure was used. Focus-group interviews were held with 35 men with diabetes and aged between 39 and 78 years. Fourteen participants were born in Arabic countries, 10 in former Yugoslavia and 11 in Sweden. FINDINGS: Important factors for health were the ability to be occupied/employed and economically independent and, especially among Arabs and former Yugoslavians, sexual functioning. Swedes focused on heredity, lifestyle and management of diabetes, while non-Swedes claimed the influence of supernatural factors and emotional stress related to the role of being an immigrant and migratory experiences as factors related to development of diabetes and having a negative influence on health. Swedes and Arabs described health as "freedom from disease" in contrast to many former Yugoslavians who described health as "wealth and the most important thing in life". Knowledge about diabetes was limited among the men studied, but Arabs showed an active information-seeking behaviour compared with Swedes and former Yugoslavians. Non-Swedish respondents, particularly Arabs, had sought help from health care professionals to a greater extent than Swedes, who were more likely to use self-care measures. CONCLUSION: Being occupied/employed and having knowledge about the body and management of diabetes are important for positive health development. There are dissimilarities in beliefs about health and diabetes that influence self-care behaviour and health care seeking. Men's cultural backgrounds and spiritual beliefs need to be considered in diabetes care.
PubMed ID
15788065 View in PubMed
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Biological factors are more important than socio-demographic and psychosocial conditions in relation to hypertension in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9857
Source
Blood Press. 2002;11(5):270-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Jonas Lidfeldt
Per Nyberg
Christina Nerbrand
Agneta Ojehagen
Göran Samsioe
Bengt Scherstén
Carl-David Agardh
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jonas.lidfeldt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Blood Press. 2002;11(5):270-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Climacteric
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Education
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to analyse the influence of biological, socio-demographic, and psychosocial factors and current perimenopausal status on hypertension in a geographically defined population of 10,766 women aged 50-59 years, of whom 6901 attended the study. Altogether 1887 (27.3%) women had hypertension: 996 with drug treatment and 891 diagnosed at the study. In a logistic multiple regression analysis (controlled for age), drug treatment of hyperlipidaemia, family history of hypertension, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index (BMI) increase > or = 25% during the past 25 years, S-triglycerides, S-cholesterol, education up to comprehensive school, and to upper secondary school, consumption of 84-167 g of alcohol/week, and of > or = 168 g of alcohol/week, were positively associated with hypertension, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and current smoking were negatively associated. A significant interaction was found between current smoking and BMI increase, with a lower risk for hypertension among smokers who had increased their BMI > or = 25%. No interaction was found between smoking and alcohol. In conclusion, hypertension was predominantly associated with biological factors, and with heredity for hypertension. Of the socio-demographic factors, only low level of education was associated with hypertension in a comprehensive analysis. Perimenopausal status showed no relation to occurrence of hypertension in the multiple regression analysis. The risk for hypertension increased with moderate and high consumption of alcohol, whereas smoking showed a decreased risk. Among women with weight gain, present smoking remained protective. Although both smoking and hypertension are established risk factors for cardiovascular disease, they seem not to be directly linked, indicating a complexity of mechanisms.
PubMed ID
12458649 View in PubMed
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Determinants of ambulatory care in a defined adult Swedish diabetic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47575
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2002 Apr;56(1):49-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Katarina Hjelm
Per Nyberg
Jan Apelqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences Malmö, University of Lund, Sweden. katarina.hjelm@ivosa.vxu.se
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2002 Apr;56(1):49-61
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Foot Ulcer - epidemiology
Geography
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - utilization
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Specialties, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate factors associated with health care utilisation in ambulatory diabetes care in relation to complications attributable to diabetes mellitus in an adult diabetic population. METHODS: A cross-sectional study; standardised interview, physical examination, and an evaluation of medical records, comprising all known diabetic subjects living in six primary health care districts in southern Sweden (N = 1861, aged > 25 years; 90.1% participation). RESULTS: People managed by specialists (17.2%) had more complications related to diabetes and were more often treated with insulin. Persons managed in health care centres with a diabetes nurse specialist used insulin more often, used self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) more regularly, lived on their own, and used meals on wheels and Community Care Alarm Service more frequently than those managed in other health centres. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed high utilisation of office visits to physicians ( > 5 visits) to be mainly associated with the presence of a foot ulcer (OR (95% CI) 2.1 (1.4-3.3)), congestive heart failure (1.6 (1.1-2.3)), and cardio-cerebrovascular disease (1.4 (1.1-1.9)). High utilisation of visits to other care-givers ( > 4 visits) was related to current or previous foot ulcers (2.4 (1.5-3.7) and 2.1 (1.2-3.5)), meals on wheels (1.9 (1.2-3.0)), and treatment with insulin (1.6 (1.2-2.1)). CONCLUSIONS: High utilisation of ambulatory diabetes care was mainly associated with health status and complications related to diabetes, particularly diabetic foot ulcers. Organisational factors such as managed care with access to a diabetes nurse specialist in a health care centre was related to increased use of self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin treatment. Visits to other care-givers were associated with access to social welfare. In diabetes care, activities to promote health and prevent complications need to be stressed.
PubMed ID
11879721 View in PubMed
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Development and psychometric evaluation of a new instrument for measuring sleep length and television and computer habits of Swedish school-age children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131775
Source
J Sch Nurs. 2012 Apr;28(2):138-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Pernilla Garmy
Ulf Jakobsson
Per Nyberg
Author Affiliation
School Health Care, Klostergårdsskolan, Lund, Sweden. pernilla.garmy@lund.se
Source
J Sch Nurs. 2012 Apr;28(2):138-43
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Computers - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Polysomnography - methods - standards
Psychometrics - methods - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sleep - physiology
Sweden
Television - utilization
Abstract
The aim was to develop a new instrument for measuring length of sleep as well as television and computer habits in school-age children. A questionnaire was constructed for use when children visit the school health care unit. Three aspects of the validity of the questionnaire were examined: its face validity, content validity, and construct validity. Test-retest reliability was assessed by giving the questionnaire twice, 2 weeks apart, to the respondents. The questionnaire was assessed as being reasonably valid, the test-retest results (n = 138) showing 90.4% of the estimates regarding bedtime on weeknights on the two survey occasions to lie within ± 30 min of each other, the test-retest agreement also being rather close (? > .600) regarding both sleep and media habits. The instrument can be a valuable tool in a clinical setting, both for measuring sleep habits in a class and for discussing sleep with individual school children and their families.
Notes
Cites: Sleep. 2000 Dec 15;23(8):1043-5111145319
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):e570-715173539
Cites: Child Dev. 1998 Aug;69(4):875-879768476
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Jan;115(1 Suppl):201-315875290
Cites: Sleep. 2007 Sep;30(9):1220-317910394
Cites: Actas Esp Psiquiatr. 2008 Jan-Feb;36(1):50-918286400
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008 Apr;162(4):330-518391141
Cites: Sleep. 2009 Feb;32(2):189-9919238806
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Apr;123(4):1171-619336377
PubMed ID
21878574 View in PubMed
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Gender influences beliefs about health and illness in diabetic subjects with severe foot lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47453
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2002 Dec;40(6):673-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Katarina Hjelm
Per Nyberg
Jan Apelqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund, Sweden. katarina.hjelm@ivosa.vxu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2002 Dec;40(6):673-84
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diabetic Foot - psychology - therapy
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: No studies have been found regarding beliefs about health and illness in patients with diabetic foot ulcers investigated from a patient perspective. Beliefs might affect self-care and health. AIM: To explore beliefs about health and illness among patients with severe diabetic foot lesions that might affect self-care practice and care-seeking behaviour. METHOD: The study design was explorative. A purposive sampling procedure was used. Focus group interviews were held, with 10 women and 11 men under 65 years (working age) and six women and 12 men over 65 years (range 23-83 years) with present or previous diabetic foot lesions managed at a specialized multidisciplinary diabetic foot clinic. FINDINGS: Foot problems were perceived by participants as caused by both external and internal factors related to the individual. Self-care was practised to restore health when ill and in daily foot care. When help was needed it was sought in the professional sector. Women were active in self-care and preventive care, searched for information and tried to adapt to the situation. Men more often sought help for acute problems, discussed more foot-related problems, had a pessimistic view of the future, showed a passive attitude, accepted information given and used more complementary care from the lay sector (wife) and/or the professional sector (district nurse, home care staff, podiatrist). Foot lesions caused deterioration of perceived health and quality of life due to decreased ability to be active. CONCLUSION: The present study emphasizes the need to take into account the existence of different beliefs about health and illness, especially regarding gender, in the prevention and management of the diabetic foot.
PubMed ID
12473048 View in PubMed
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Health status and functional profile at admission of nursing home residents in Iceland over 11-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101358
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2011 Aug 1;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2011
Author
Ingibjörg Hjaltadóttir
Ingalill R Hallberg
Anna K Ekwall
Per Nyberg
Author Affiliation
Doctoral Student, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland and The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Professor, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden Lecturer, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Senior Lecturer, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2011 Aug 1;
Date
Aug-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
hjaltadóttir i., hallberg i.r., ekwall a.k. & nyberg p. (2011) Health status and functional profile at admission of nursing home residents in Iceland over 11-year period. International Journal of Older People Nursing doi: 10.1111/j.1748-3743.2011.00287.x Background. The knowledge over time of the health status and changes in care needs of newly admitted nursing home residents is limited. Objectives. To investigate trends in residents' health status and functional profile at admission to nursing homes and compare rural and capital areas in Iceland over an 11-year period. Design. Retrospective analysis of nursing home data over 11 years (1996-2006). Participants. Residents, who had been assessed with the Minimum Data Set assessment within 90 days from admittance (n = 2206). Method. Non-parametric tests for descriptive statistics and linear regressions were used to analyse time trends. Results. The mean age ranged from 80.1 to 82.8, and women accounted for 52.7% to 67.1%. The level of independency indicated intact cognitive performance in 28.6-61.4% and in 42.5-68% in activities of daily living performance. A weak, but significant, linear trend was seen in residents' health becoming less stable, their cognitive performance improving, more pain being reported and greater participation in social activities over the 11 years. Conclusion. Some residents might have stayed at home longer had they been given appropriate home care and the opportunity of rehabilitation. Pain management and social activities are areas where more staff knowledge seems to be needed. Implications for practice. Resources to enable old people to remain at home need to be explored before their entry into nursing homes. Whereas providing services at the appropriate level is important for society as well as older people.
PubMed ID
21801320 View in PubMed
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The influence of calcium and magnesium in drinking water and diet on cardiovascular risk factors in individuals living in hard and soft water areas with differences in cardiovascular mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61612
Source
BMC Public Health. 2003 Jun 18;3:21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-18-2003
Author
Christina Nerbrand
Lars Agréus
Ragnhild Arvidsson Lenner
Per Nyberg
Kurt Svärdsudd
Author Affiliation
Primary Care R&D, Department of Medicine, University of Lund, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. christina.nerbrand@skane.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2003 Jun 18;3:21
Date
Jun-18-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium - administration & dosage - adverse effects - metabolism
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage - adverse effects - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - metabolism - mortality
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Surveys
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Magnesium - administration & dosage - adverse effects - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Muscles - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban health
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The role of water hardness as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease has been widely investigated and evaluated as regards regional differences in cardiovascular disease. This study was performed to evaluate the relation between calcium and magnesium in drinking water and diet and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in individuals living in hard and soft water areas with considerable differences in cardiovascular mortality. METHODS: A random sample of 207 individuals living in two municipalities characterised by differences in cardiovascular mortality and water hardness was invited for an examination including a questionnaire about health, social and living conditions and diet. Intake of magnesium and calcium was calculated from the diet questionnaire with special consideration to the use of local water. Household water samples were delivered by each individual and were analysed for magnesium and calcium. RESULTS: In the total sample, there were positive correlations between the calcium content in household water and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and negative correlations with s-cholesterol and s-LDL-cholesterol. No correlation was seen with magnesium content in household water to any of the risk factors.Calcium content in diet showed no correlation to cardiovascular risk factors. Magnesium in diet was positively correlated to diastolic blood pressure (DBP). In regression analyses controlled for age and sex 18.5% of the variation in SBP was explained by the variation in BMI, HbA1c and calcium content in water. Some 27.9% of the variation in s-cholesterol could be explained by the variation in s-triglycerides (TG), and calcium content in water. CONCLUSIONS: This study of individuals living in soft and hard water areas showed significant correlations between the content of calcium in water and major cardiovascular risk factors. This was not found for magnesium in water or calcium or magnesium in diet. Regression analyses indicated that calcium content in water could be a factor in the complexity of relationships and importance of cardiovascular risk factors. From these results it is not possible to conclude any definite causal relation and further research is needed.
PubMed ID
12814520 View in PubMed
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Influence of family history and smoking habits on the incidence of self-reported physician's diagnosis of COPD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67261
Source
Respir Med. 2004 Mar;98(3):263-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Ulf Nihlén
Per Nyberg
Peter Montnémery
Claes-Göran Löfdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. ulf.nihlen@lung.lu.se
Source
Respir Med. 2004 Mar;98(3):263-70
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bronchitis - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Pulmonary Emphysema - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is little investigated. This study assessed the incidence of a self-reported physician's diagnosis of chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema (CBE) and/or COPD (CBE/COPD), and investigated the effects of a family history of CBE in 1992 and change in smoking habits (assessed in 1992 and 2000) on this incidence. METHODS: A follow-up study in 2000 of 4933 subjects who responded to a respiratory questionnaire study in 1992 was performed. Response rate was 86.8%. Odds ratios (ORs) for incident cases of CBE/COPD were calculated by multiple Logistic regression. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of a physician's diagnosis of CBE/COPD was 2.9%. A family history of CBE predicted incident cases of CBE/COPD, OR 2.7 (95% CI 1.5-5.1). Also continuous smoking, relapse into smoking, or having stopped smoking between 1992 and 2000 had elevated ORs for incident cases of CBE/COPD, 2.6 (1.4-4.7), 7.2 (2.7-18.7), and 2.6 (1.3-5.3), while the OR for ex-smoking in 1992 as well as 2000 was 0.9 (0.4-1.8). CONCLUSIONS: A family history of CBE increases the risk for development of CBE/COPD. Sustained smoking cessation over many years may be required to significantly reduce the risk of developing CBE/COPD.
PubMed ID
15002763 View in PubMed
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The influence of hormonal status and features of the metabolic syndrome on bone density: a population-based study of Swedish women aged 50 to 59 years. The women's health in the Lund area study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71760
Source
Metabolism. 2002 Feb;51(2):267-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Jonas Lidfeldt
Lydia Holmdahl
Göran Samsioe
Christina Nerbrand
Per Nyberg
Bengt Scherstén
Carl-David Agardh
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Metabolism. 2002 Feb;51(2):267-70
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Bone Density
Cholesterol - blood
Densitometry, X-Ray
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Hormones - blood
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Triglycerides - blood
Women's health
Abstract
This study investigated whether there is an association between bone density and features of the metabolic syndrome in relation to hormonal status. All women aged 50 to 59 years living in a defined geographic area in Sweden were offered a health assessment program including blood glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure, and bone densitometry. Women were divided into 3 groups according to their hormonal status: premenopausal (PM), postmenopausal with hormone replacement therapy (PMT), and postmenopausal without hormone replacement therapy (PM0). Of the 6,886 women investigated, 7% were PM, 41% PMT, and 52% PM0. The overall prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) definition, was 42.6% and 6.6%, respectively. T-score in the PM group was higher than in the PMT (P
PubMed ID
11833060 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.