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Abandoning "the other": statistical enumeration of Swedish Sami, 1700 to 1945 and beyond.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135562
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Centre for Sami Research, Umeå, Sweden. per.axelsson@cesam.umu.se
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses - history
Ethnic groups - history
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Dynamics
Population Groups - history
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden has one of the world's most eminent and exhaustive records of statistical information on its population. As early as the eighteenth century, ethnic notations were being made in parish registers throughout the country, and by the early nineteenth century a specific category for the Sami population had been added to the forms used to collect data for the Tabellverket (National Population Statistics). Beginning in 1860, the Sami were also counted in the first official census of the Swedish state. Nonetheless--and in contrast to many other countries--Sweden today lacks separate statistical information not only about its sole recognized indigenous population but also about other ethnic groups. The present paper investigates Sweden's attempts to enumerate its indigenous Sami population prior to World War II and the cessation of ethnic enumeration after the war. How have the Sami been identified and enumerated? How have statistical categories been constructed, and how have they changed over time? The aim of this essay is not to assess the validity of the demographic sources. Instead the paper will explore the historical, social, and cultural factors that have had a bearing on how a dominant administrative structure has dealt with the statistical construct of an indigenous population.
PubMed ID
21466142 View in PubMed
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Infant mortality of Sami and settlers in Northern Sweden: the era of colonization 1750-1900.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130015
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011 ; 4 : 33-40.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Peter Sköld
Per Axelsson
Lena Karlsson
Len Smith
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011 ; 4 : 33-40.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
348758
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Female
Health status
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant Mortality - history - trends
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parity
Population Groups - history - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Sweden
Demography
Indigenous peoples
Seasonality
Sami
Vulnerability
Abstract
The study deals with infant mortality (IMR) that is one of the most important aspects of indigenous vulnerability.
The Sami are one of very few indigenous peoples with an experience of a positive mortality transition.
Using unique mortality data from the period 1750-1900 Sami and the colonizers in northern Sweden are compared in order to reveal an eventual infant mortality transition.
The results show ethnic differences with the Sami having higher IMR, although the differences decrease over time. There were also geographical and cultural differences within the Sami, with significantly lower IMR among the South Sami. Generally, parity has high explanatory value, where an increased risk is noted for children born as number five or higher among siblings.
There is a striking trend of decreasing IMR among the Sami after 1860, which, however, was not the result of professional health care. Other indigenous peoples of the Arctic still have higher mortality rates, and IMR below 100 was achieved only after 1950 in most countries. The decrease in Sami infant mortality was certainly an important factor in their unique health transition, but the most significant change occurred after 1900.
Notes
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(2):159-6011242823
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
Cites: Milbank Mem Fund Q. 1971 Oct;49(4):509-385155251
Cites: J Biosoc Sci. 2001 Jan;33(1):67-8611316396
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-8519577696
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2019-2816782493
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):27-4218468257
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-7519577695
Cites: Soc Hist Med. 1988 Dec;1(3):329-5811621729
PubMed ID
22043216 View in PubMed
Documents

Skold-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Intra-oral pattern of tooth and periodontal bone loss between the age of 50 and 60 years. A longitudinal prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67213
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2004 Aug;62(4):214-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Jörgen Paulander
Per Axelsson
Jan Lindhe
Jan Wennström
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. jorgen.paulander@liv.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2004 Aug;62(4):214-22
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Pulp Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Periodontal Index
Prospective Studies
Sampling Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: In a 10-year prospective study we analyzed (i) the intra-oral pattern of and (ii) potential risk factors for tooth and periodontal bone loss in 50-year-old individuals. METHODS: A randomized subject sample of 50-year-old inhabitants in the County of Varmland, Sweden, was examined at baseline and after 10 years. Data from full-mouth clinical and radiographic examinations and questionnaire surveys of 309 (72%) of the individuals who were dentate at baseline were available for analysis. Non-parametric tests and binary logistic multiple regression models were used for statistical analysis of the data. RESULTS: 4.1% of the 7,101 teeth present at baseline, distributed among 39% of the subjects, were lost during the 10-year interval. The incidence of tooth loss was highest among mandibular molars (7.5%) and lowest among canines (1.8%). The relative risk (RR) for tooth loss for endodontically compromised teeth was 4.1 and for furcation-involved molars 2.4-6.5, depending on tooth position. Logistic regression analysis identified baseline alveolar bone level (ABL), endodontic conditions, CPITN score (Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs), tooth position, caries, and educational level as risk factors for tooth loss. The overall mean 10-year ABL change was -0.54 mm (S.E. 0.01). On a tooth level the ABL change varied between -0.35 mm (mandibular molars) and -0.79 mm (mandibular incisors). Smokers experienced a greater (20-131% depending on tooth type) mean bone loss than non-smokers. The logistic regression model revealed that tooth position, smoking, and probing pocket depth > or =4 mm were risk factors for bone loss of >1 mm. No pertinent differences were observed with respect to risk factors for ABL change in the subgroup of non-smokers compared to the results of the analysis based on the entire subject sample. CONCLUSION: Tooth loss was more common in the molar than in the anterior tooth regions, while periodontal bone loss had a random distribution in the dentition. The predominant risk factors identified with regard to further radiographic bone loss were "probing pocket depth > or =6 mm" and "smoking".
PubMed ID
15513418 View in PubMed
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Somatic health in the Indigenous Sami population - a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309400
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1638195
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review
Date
12-2019
Author
Christina Storm Mienna
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
a Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1638195
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Life expectancy
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this systematic review was to survey the current scientific knowledge regarding the state of somatic health among situation of the Indigenous Sami people in Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia; and assess the quality of the identified studies. A systematic search in the databases Pubmed, EBSCOhost (AMED, Medline, Cinahl) and Svemed was conducted from January 2000, through December 2017. This systematic search identified 399 articles. After screening abstracts, 93 articles were reviewed in full text, 32 of which met the inclusion criteria. The scientific quality of the evidence was rated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Based on the studies with moderate to high scientific quality, there is evidence for stating that the majority of the Sami included in this review experience good health. Mortality and life expectancy are similar, with only minor differences, to those of a non-Sami population. The cancer risk rate among Sami was lower than that of the general population of Norway, Sweden and Finland. Self-reported myocardial infarction prevalence was similar between Sami and non-Sami, but Angina pectoris was more prevalent among Sami. In Sweden, cardiovascular disease rates were similar between Sami and non-Sami. Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common among the Sami population, as are obesity and overweight. To conclude, there are knowledge gaps in regard to the somatic health situation of the Indigenous Sami in the circumpolar area, especially in Russia, Finland and Sweden; as current knowledge is mainly based on publications from the SAMINOR study in Norway. No study obtained the highest quality score, suggesting a need to implement longitudinal prospective studies.
PubMed ID
31262241 View in PubMed
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Somatic health in the Indigenous Sami population - a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301549
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1638195
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2019
Author
Christina Storm Mienna
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
a Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1638195
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The objective of this systematic review was to survey the current scientific knowledge regarding the state of somatic health among situation of the Indigenous Sami people in Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia; and assess the quality of the identified studies. A systematic search in the databases Pubmed, EBSCOhost (AMED, Medline, Cinahl) and Svemed was conducted from January 2000, through December 2017. This systematic search identified 399 articles. After screening abstracts, 93 articles were reviewed in full text, 32 of which met the inclusion criteria. The scientific quality of the evidence was rated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Based on the studies with moderate to high scientific quality, there is evidence for stating that the majority of the Sami included in this review experience good health. Mortality and life expectancy are similar, with only minor differences, to those of a non-Sami population. The cancer risk rate among Sami was lower than that of the general population of Norway, Sweden and Finland. Self-reported myocardial infarction prevalence was similar between Sami and non-Sami, but Angina pectoris was more prevalent among Sami. In Sweden, cardiovascular disease rates were similar between Sami and non-Sami. Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common among the Sami population, as are obesity and overweight. To conclude, there are knowledge gaps in regard to the somatic health situation of the Indigenous Sami in the circumpolar area, especially in Russia, Finland and Sweden; as current knowledge is mainly based on publications from the SAMINOR study in Norway. No study obtained the highest quality score, suggesting a need to implement longitudinal prospective studies.
PubMed ID
31262241 View in PubMed
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Some characteristics of 50/55-year-old individuals with various experience of destructive periodontal disease: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51942
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2004 Aug;62(4):199-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Jörgen Paulander
Per Axelsson
Jan Lindhe
Jan Wennström
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. jorgen.paulander@liv.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2004 Aug;62(4):199-206
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Index
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Smoking
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between subject characteristics and degree of destructive periodontal disease in a randomly selected sample of 50/55-year-old individuals. METHODS: A randomized and geographically stratified (urban/rural districts) subject sample composed of dentate 50-year-old (n = 190) and 55-year-old individuals (n = 359) from the county of Varmland, Sweden were examined. Data were collected through full mouth clinical and radiographic examinations and by the use of questionnaires. Based on the cumulative distribution of the individuals with respect to mean probing attachment loss (PAL), subgroups of subjects with the lowest (L20%) and highest (H20%) experience of PAL were identified. Similar classifications were made for never-smokers and current smokers. Correlation analyses and forward stepwise logistic regression models were performed. RESULTS: The subgroup with the most extensive PAL loss (H20%) included a significantly higher proportion of (i) males (60 vs 33%), (ii) subjects with low educational level (65 vs 41%), (iii) smokers (49 vs 15%), and had (iv) less favorable lifestyle characteristics than the subgroup with minimal experience of PAL loss (L20%). The same pattern of differences was observed when the analysis was restricted to never-smokers, with the addition of a significantly lower proportion of subjects living in urban areas (40 vs 69%) in the H20% compared to the L20% subgroup. The stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that number of teeth and smoking habits were significant factors in the identification of individuals in the L20% subgroup. For the H20% subgroup, number of teeth, gender, number of cigarettes/day and lifestyle index were significant explanatory variables. CONCLUSION: Number of remaining teeth and smoking habits were identified as the main discriminating factors for classification of subjects with regard to degree of destructive periodontal disease.
PubMed ID
15513416 View in PubMed
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Some risk factors for periodontal bone loss in 50-year-old individuals. A 10-year cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67233
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2004 Jul;31(7):489-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Jörgen Paulander
Jan L Wennström
Per Axelsson
Jan Lindhe
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden. Jorgen.Paulander@liv.se
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2004 Jul;31(7):489-96
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Index
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Rural Health
Sampling Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - complications
Urban health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this 10-year prospective study of 50-year-old individuals was to analyze the incidence of periodontal bone loss and potential risk factors for periodontal bone loss. METHODS: The subject sample was generated from an epidemiological survey performed in 1988 of subjects living in the County of Värmland, Sweden. A randomized sample of 15% of the 50-year-old inhabitants in the county was drawn. At the 10-year follow-up in 1998, 320 (75%) of the 449 individuals examined at baseline were available for re-examination, out of which 4 had become edentulous. Full-mouth clinical and radiographic examinations and questionnaire surveys were performed in 1988 and 1998. Two hundred and ninety-five individuals (69%) had complete data for inclusion in the analysis of radiographic bone changes over 10 years. Non-parametric tests, correlations and stepwise multiple regression models were used for statistical analysis of the data. RESULTS: The mean alveolar bone level (ABL) in 1988 was 2.2 mm (0.05) and a further 0.4 mm (0.57) (p=0.000) was lost over the 10 years. Eight percent of the subject sample showed no loss, while 5% experienced a mean bone loss of >/=1 mm. Smoking was found to be the strongest individual risk predictor (RR=3.2; 95% CI 2.03-5.15). When including as smokers only those individuals who had continued with the habit during the entire 10-year follow-up period, the relative risk was slightly increased (3.6; 95% CI 2.32-5.57). Subjects who had quit smoking before the baseline examination did not demonstrate a significantly increased risk for disease progression (RR=1.3; 95% CI 0.57-2.96). Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that smoking, % approximal sites with probing pocket depth >/=4 mm, number of teeth and systemic disease were significant explanatory factors for 10-year ABL loss (R(2)=0.12). For never smokers, statistically significant predictors were number of teeth, mean ABL, % periodontally healthy approximal sites and educational level (R(2)=0.20). CONCLUSION: The inclusion of smokers in risk analysis for periodontal diseases may obstruct the possibility to detect other true risk factors and risk indicators.
PubMed ID
15191581 View in PubMed
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[The history of polio in Sweden - from infantile paralysis to polio vaccine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29600
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2004;8(1):57-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för historiska studier Umeå Universitet.
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2004;8(1):57-66
Date
2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Disease Outbreaks - history
English Abstract
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Incidence
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - history
Poliovirus Vaccines - history
Portraits
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although other epidemics declined due to improved hygiene and sanitation, legislation, and vaccination, polio epidemics appeared in Sweden in 1881 and at the turn of the 20th century the disease became and annual feature in the Swedish epidemiological pattern. Due to the vaccination starting in 1957 epidemics ceased to exist in Sweden around 1965.This article deals with the history polio epidemics in Sweden, 1880-1965 and gives a brief description of: the demographical influence of polio, how did the medical authorities investigate and try to combat it, and the different comprehensions of how polio affected its victims.A study of polio incidence in Sweden at the national level during 1905-1962 reveals that the disease caused major epidemics in 1911-1913 and 1953. At the beginning of the 20th century polio primarily attacked children up to 10 years of age, and at the end of the period victims were represented in all age groups, but mainly in the ages 20-39.Due to its enigmatic appearance, polio was not considered as an epidemic infectious disease during the 19th century. Sweden's early epidemics enabled Swedish medical science to act and together with American research institutes it acquired a leading role in international medical research on the disease. In the 1955 Jonas Salk produced the first successful vaccine against polio but also Sweden developed its own vaccine, different in choice of methods and materials from the widely used Salk-vaccine.
PubMed ID
16025605 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.