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30-year trends in asthma and the trends in relation to hospitalization and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297877
Source
Respir Med. 2018 09; 142:29-35
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Margit K Pelkonen
Irma-Leena K Notkola
Tiina K Laatikainen
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Medicine, Center for Medicine and Clinical Research, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Electronic address: Margit.Pelkonen@kuh.fi.
Source
Respir Med. 2018 09; 142:29-35
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
The present study examines how trends in the prevalence of asthma during the past three decades associate with hospitalization and mortality during the same period.
Altogether 54?320 subjects aged 25-74 years were examined in seven independent cross-sectional population surveys repeated every five years between 1982 and 2012 in Finland. The study protocol included a standardized questionnaire on self-reported asthma, smoking habits and other risk factors, and clinical measurements at the study site. Data on hospitalizations were obtained from the Care Register for Health Care, and data on mortality from the National Causes of Death register.
During the study, the prevalence of asthma increased - especially in women. In asthmatic compared with non-asthmatic subjects, hospitalization was significantly higher for all causes, respiratory causes, cardiovascular causes and lung cancer. In addition, particularly in asthmatic subjects, mean yearly hospital days in the 5-year periods after each survey diminished. In asthmatic subjects, the decrease in yearly all-cause hospital days was from 4.45 (between 1982 and 1987) to 1.11 (between 2012 and 2015) and in subjects without asthma the corresponding decrease was from 1.77 to 0.60 (p?
PubMed ID
30170798 View in PubMed
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40-Year CHD Mortality Trends and the Role of Risk Factors in Mortality Decline: The North Karelia Project Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289324
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
06-2016
Author
Pekka Jousilahti
Tiina Laatikainen
Veikko Salomaa
Arto Pietilä
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Health, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: pekka.jousilahti@thl.fi.
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Public Health
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
In the 1960s and early 1970s, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Finland was the highest in the world, and within Finland, mortality was particularly high in the eastern part of the country. The North Karelia Project, the first large community-based cardiovascular diseases prevention program was established in 1972 to reduce the extremely high CHD mortality through behavioral change and reduction of the main cardiovascular disease risk factors among the whole population of North Karelia, the easternmost province of Finland. During the 40-year period from 1972 to 2012, smoking prevalence, serum total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure declined markedly, except a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From the early 1970s to 2012, CHD mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 per 100,000) among working-age (35 to 64 years) men. Among working-age women, the decline was 84% (from 114 to 17 per 100,000). During the first 10 years, changes in these 3 target risk factors explained nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than the predicted reduction. In the early 1970s, premature CHD mortality (35 to 74 years) was about 37% higher among Eastern Finnish men and 23% higher among Eastern Finnish women, compared with men and women in Southwestern Finland. During the last 40 years, premature CHD mortality declined markedly in both areas, but the decline was larger in Eastern Finland and the mortality gap between the two areas nearly disappeared.
PubMed ID
27242088 View in PubMed
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40-Year CHD Mortality Trends and the Role of Risk Factors in Mortality Decline: The North Karelia Project Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273308
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 Jun;11(2):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Pekka Jousilahti
Tiina Laatikainen
Veikko Salomaa
Arto Pietilä
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 Jun;11(2):207-12
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In the 1960s and early 1970s, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Finland was the highest in the world, and within Finland, mortality was particularly high in the eastern part of the country. The North Karelia Project, the first large community-based cardiovascular diseases prevention program was established in 1972 to reduce the extremely high CHD mortality through behavioral change and reduction of the main cardiovascular disease risk factors among the whole population of North Karelia, the easternmost province of Finland. During the 40-year period from 1972 to 2012, smoking prevalence, serum total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure declined markedly, except a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From the early 1970s to 2012, CHD mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 per 100,000) among working-age (35 to 64 years) men. Among working-age women, the decline was 84% (from 114 to 17 per 100,000). During the first 10 years, changes in these 3 target risk factors explained nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than the predicted reduction. In the early 1970s, premature CHD mortality (35 to 74 years) was about 37% higher among Eastern Finnish men and 23% higher among Eastern Finnish women, compared with men and women in Southwestern Finland. During the last 40 years, premature CHD mortality declined markedly in both areas, but the decline was larger in Eastern Finland and the mortality gap between the two areas nearly disappeared.
PubMed ID
27242088 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the healthy Nordic diet is associated with weight change during 7 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303010
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 07; 120(1):101-110
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Noora Kanerva
Kennet Harald
Satu Männistö
Niina E Kaartinen
Mirkka Maukonen
Ari Haukkala
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health Solutions,National Institute for Health and Welfare,PO Box 30,27100 Helsinki,Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 07; 120(1):101-110
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Body Weight
Diet
Diet, Healthy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Overweight - prevention & control - therapy
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Studies indicate that the healthy Nordic diet may improve heart health, but its relation to weight change is less clear. We studied the association between the adherence to the healthy Nordic diet and long-term changes in weight, BMI and waist circumference. Furthermore, the agreement between self-reported and measured body anthropometrics was examined. The population-based DIetary, Lifestyle and Genetic Determinants of Obesity and Metabolic syndrome Study in 2007 included 5024 Finns aged 25-75 years. The follow-up was conducted in 2014 (n 3735). One-third of the participants were invited to a health examination. The rest were sent measuring tape and written instructions along with questionnaires. The Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) was used to measure adherence to the healthy Nordic diet. Association of the baseline BSDS and changes in BSDS during the follow-up with changes in body anthropometrics were examined using linear regression analysis. The agreement between self-reported and nurse-measured anthropometrics was determined with Bland-Altman analysis. Intra-class correlation coefficients between self-reported and nurse-measured anthropometrics exceeded 0·95. The baseline BSDS associated with lower weight (ß=-0·056, P=0·043) and BMI (ß=-0·021, P=0·031) over the follow-up. This association was especially evident among those who had increased their BSDS. In conclusion, both high initial and improved adherence to the healthy Nordic diet may promote long-term weight maintenance. The self-reported/measured anthropometrics were shown to have high agreement with nurse-measured values which adds the credibility of our results.
PubMed ID
29936927 View in PubMed
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Adjusting for selective non-participation with re-contact data in the FINRISK 2012 survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296112
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Nov; 46(7):758-766
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Juho Kopra
Tommi Härkänen
Hanna Tolonen
Pekka Jousilahti
Kari Kuulasmaa
Jaakko Reinikainen
Juha Karvanen
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Nov; 46(7):758-766
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Selection Bias
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
A common objective of epidemiological surveys is to provide population-level estimates of health indicators. Survey results tend to be biased under selective non-participation. One approach to bias reduction is to collect information about non-participants by contacting them again and asking them to fill in a questionnaire. This information is called re-contact data, and it allows to adjust the estimates for non-participation.
We analyse data from the FINRISK 2012 survey, where re-contact data were collected. We assume that the respondents of the re-contact survey are similar to the remaining non-participants with respect to the health given their available background information. Validity of this assumption is evaluated based on the hospitalisation data obtained through record linkage of survey data to the administrative registers. Using this assumption and multiple imputation, we estimate the prevalences of daily smoking and heavy alcohol consumption and compare them to estimates obtained with a commonly used assumption that the participants represent the entire target group.
When adjusting for non-participation using re-contact data, higher prevalence estimates were observed compared to prevalence estimates based on participants only. Among men, the smoking prevalence estimate was 28.5% (23.2% for participants) and heavy alcohol consumption prevalence was 9.4% (6.8% for participants). Among women, smoking prevalence was 19% (16.5% for participants) and heavy alcohol consumption was 4.8% (3% for participants).
The utilisation of re-contact data is a useful method to adjust for non-participation bias on population estimates in epidemiological surveys.
PubMed ID
29072108 View in PubMed
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Allergic diseases, skin prick test responses, and IgE levels in North Karelia, Finland, and the Republic of Karelia, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190659
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2002 Apr;109(4):643-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Erkki Vartiainen
Tuula Petäys
Tari Haahtela
Pekka Jousilahti
Juha Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2002 Apr;109(4):643-8
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Skin Tests
Abstract
There is growing evidence to show that atopic diseases are more common in Western Europe than in the former socialist countries of Eastern Europe.
The aim of this study was to assess whether a similar difference exists between the most eastern province of Finland and a neighboring western district of Russia.
A random sample of 25- to 54-year-old subjects was taken from the population registers in the North Karelia Province in eastern Finland and from the Pitkäranta district across the border in the western part of Russia. Participants filled out a questionnaire on atopic and allergic symptoms and participated in a clinical study, which included skin prick tests with 11 airborne allergens and IgE measurements.
Self-reported hay fever, allergic eye symptoms, atopic eczema, and asthma were much more common in Finland than in Russia. In Finland 34.2% and in Russia 21.8% had at least one positive skin prick test reaction. In Finland 21.5% but in Russia only 15.8% had at least one elevated allergen-specific IgE value of the 5 values measured. From 6% to 47% of the differences in self-reported symptoms between the countries were explained by atopy, as measured by means of skin prick testing or specific IgE values.
A major difference in clinical allergic diseases and signs of symptoms was observed between the 2 geographically adjacent areas. This suggests that the difference in clinical allergy and atopic disposition is related to the differences in lifestyle and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
11941314 View in PubMed
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Appetitive traits as behavioural pathways in genetic susceptibility to obesity: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275595
Source
Sci Rep. 2015;5:14726
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Clare Llewellyn
Jane Wardle
Karri Silventoinen
Anni Joensuu
Satu Männistö
Veikko Salomaa
Pekka Jousilahti
Jaakko Kaprio
Markus Perola
Ari Haukkala
Source
Sci Rep. 2015;5:14726
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Appetite
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Multifactorial Inheritance
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Population Surveillance
Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The mechanisms through which genes influence body weight are not well understood, but appetite has been implicated as one mediating pathway. Here we use data from two independent population-based Finnish cohorts (4632 adults aged 25-74 years from the DILGOM study and 1231 twin individuals aged 21-26 years from the FinnTwin12 study) to investigate whether two appetitive traits mediate the associations between known obesity-related genetic variants and adiposity. The results from structural equation modelling indicate that the effects of a polygenic risk score (90 obesity-related loci) on measured body mass index and waist circumference are partly mediated through higher levels of uncontrolled eating (ßindirect = 0.030-0.032, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
26423639 View in PubMed
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Appropriateness of anthropometric obesity indicators in assessment of coronary heart disease risk among Finnish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180480
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(4):283-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Karri Silventoinen
Pekka Jousilahti
Erkki Vartiainen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55454-1015, USA. silventoinen@epi.umn.edu
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(4):283-90
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Anthropometry
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The aim of the study was to compare the appropriateness of different obesity indicators in the assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.
The study cohort included 11,510 Finnish men and women aged 25 to 64 year at baseline who participated in a cardiovascular disease risk factor survey in 1987 or 1992. At baseline, data on smoking and diabetes were recorded, blood pressure. body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were measured, and serum total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were determined. A follow-up was done to the end of 1997. Death or diagnosed event from CHD was used as an outcome variable.
At baseline, BMI was the best explaining variable for systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and for total cholesterol, whereas WC was the best explaining variable for HDL cholesterol, among both men and women. During the follow-up, WHR was the best predictor of CHD incidence. However, after the adjustment for other CHD risk factors none of the obesity indicators remained statistically significant. In both sexes, BMI was a statistically significant predictor of CHD incidence among subjects with DBP lower than the mean. Among men, a similar interaction was seen between DBP and WC.
WHR was the best predictor of CHD incidence in our data. Abdominal obesity has an effect on CHD incidence independently of general obesity.
PubMed ID
15099034 View in PubMed
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Association between all-cause and cause-specific mortality and the GOLD stages 1-4: A 30-year follow-up among Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272552
Source
Respir Med. 2015 Aug;109(8):1012-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Tiina Mattila
Tuula Vasankari
Merja Kanervisto
Tarja Laitinen
Olli Impivaara
Harri Rissanen
Paul Knekt
Pekka Jousilahti
Seppo Saarelainen
Pauli Puukka
Markku Heliövaara
Source
Respir Med. 2015 Aug;109(8):1012-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - mortality - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate - trends
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Mortality correlates with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria of airway obstruction. Yet, little data exist concerning the long-term survival of patients presenting with different levels of obstruction.
We studied the association between all-cause and cause-specific mortality and GOLD stages 1-4 in a 30-year follow-up among 6636 Finnish men and women aged 30 or older participating in the Mini-Finland Health Study between 1978 and 1980.
After adjusting for age, sex, and smoking history, the GOLD stage of the subject showed a strong direct relationship with all-cause mortality, mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, and cancer. The adjusted hazard ratios of death were 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.51), 1.40 (1.21-1.63), 1.55 (1.21-1.97) and 2.85 (1.65-4.94) for GOLD stages 1-4, respectively, with FEV1/FVC =70% as the reference. The association between GOLD stages 2-4 and mortality was strongest among subjects under 50 years of age at the baseline measurement. Cardiovascular mortality increased consistently for all GOLD stages.
Airway obstruction indicates an increased risk for all-cause mortality according to the severity of the GOLD stage. We found that even stage 1 carries a risk for cardiovascular death independently of smoking history and other known risk factors.
PubMed ID
26108990 View in PubMed
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Association of age and education with different types of leisure-time physical activity among 4437 Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157943
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2008 Mar;5(2):242-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Katja Borodulin
Tiina Laatikainen
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Pekka Jousilahti
Timo A Lakka
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Dept of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2008 Mar;5(2):242-51
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of age and education with types of leisure-time physical activity in a population sample of Finnish adults.
The sample, part of the National FINRISK Study, comprised 1940 men and 2497 women age 25 to 64 years. Self-reported questionnaires were used to collect data on education and leisure-time physical activity. Overall leisure-time physical activity was further divided into conditioning and daily physical activity.
In men and women, age had an inverse association with conditioning physical activity but not with daily and overall leisure activity. Strong direct associations were found between education and conditioning and overall leisure activity.
All age groups report fairly similar levels of overall and daily levels of leisure-time physical activity, but the levels differ across educational groups. In health promotion, more emphasis should be targeted to the population groups with lower education.
PubMed ID
18382033 View in PubMed
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105 records – page 1 of 11.