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Complexity of primary lifetime occupation and cognition in advanced old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77737
Source
J Aging Health. 2007 Jun;19(3):397-415
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Andel Ross
Kåreholt Ingemar
Parker Marti G
Thorslund Mats
Gatz Margaret
Author Affiliation
School of Aging Studies, MHC 1321, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620, USA. randel@cas.usf.edu.
Source
J Aging Health. 2007 Jun;19(3):397-415
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Cognition Disorders
Education
Female
Humans
Male
Occupations
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The authors explored the association between complexity of primary lifetime occupation and cognition in older adulthood. METHOD: The study included 386 participants from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old, a nationally representative sample aged 77 years or older. The authors examined complexity of work with data, people, and things in relation to cognitive functioning, measured with a shortened version of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and cognitive impairment based on MMSE score cutoff. RESULTS: Complexity of work with data and people were associated with better MMSE scores, controlling for age, sex, childhood socioeconomic status, and education. The association between complexity of work with data and MMSE remained statistically significant when adult occupational status was substituted for education as a covariate. DISCUSSION: Complexity of primary lifetime occupation may be reflected in cognitive functioning even in advanced old age. This effect may be independent of education or occupational status.
PubMed ID
17496241 View in PubMed
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Continuity of leisure participation from middle age to old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79771
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2006 Nov;61(6):S340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Agahi Neda
Ahacic Kozma
Parker Marti G
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. neda.agahi@ki.se
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2006 Nov;61(6):S340-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Interviews
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Continuity in habits, activities, and roles is important upon entering old age according to the continuity theory of aging. Few studies have investigated patterns of leisure participation over an extended period of time among older adults. This study examines changes in nine different leisure activities in a nationally representative sample of individuals followed over a 34-year period in Sweden. METHODS: We used longitudinal data from three waves of an interview survey that followed 495 individuals from 1968 to 2002. Individuals were aged 43-65 in 1968 and 77-99 in 2002. We conducted logistic regression analyses on each of the leisure activities. RESULT: For the panel followed, a decline in participation rates was the most common pattern over time. Analyses at the individual level showed that late-life participation was generally preceded by participation earlier in life. Previous participation, both 10 and 34 years earlier, predicted late-life participation. The modifying effect of functional status in late life was small. DISCUSSION: In accordance with the continuity theory of aging, leisure participation in old age is often a continuation of previous participation. However, there is considerable variation among both activities and individuals.
PubMed ID
17114314 View in PubMed
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Leisure activities and mortality: does gender matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91898
Source
J Aging Health. 2008 Oct;20(7):855-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Agahi Neda
Parker Marti G
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Gävlegatan 16, 113 30 Stockholm, Sweden. neda.agahi@ki.se.
Source
J Aging Health. 2008 Oct;20(7):855-71
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Educational Status
Female
Gender Identity
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Recreation
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study examines the association between participation in leisure activities and mortality risk among older men and women. METHODS: A representative sample of 1,246 men and women ages 65 to 95, interviewed in 1991-1992, were followed for 12 years. Cox regressions analyzed mortality risk. RESULTS: Participating in only a few activities doubled mortality risk compared to those with the highest participation levels, even after controlling for age, education, walking ability, and other health indicators. Women had a dose-response relationship between overall participation and survival. Strong associations with survival were found for engagement in organizational activities and study circles among women and hobby activities and gardening among men. DISCUSSION: Results suggest gender differences in the association between leisure activities and mortality. Women display a decreasing mortality risk for each additional activity. Social activities have the strongest effects on survival among women, whereas men seem to benefit from solitary activities.
PubMed ID
18815413 View in PubMed
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Mentally stimulating activities at work during midlife and dementia risk after age 75: follow-up study from the Kungsholmen Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88977
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;17(3):227-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Karp Anita
Andel Ross
Parker Marti G
Wang Hui-Xin
Winblad Bengt
Fratiglioni Laura
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, and the Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Gävlegatan 16, Stockholm, Sweden. anita.karp@.ki.se
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;17(3):227-36
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Educational Status
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Occupations - classification - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Previous research has suggested that mental stimulation in different life periods may protect against dementia or delay disease onset. This study aimed to explore the association between work complexity factors at midlife and dementia risk in late life under the hypothesis that high work complexity may modulate the increased dementia risk due to low education. DESIGN: Population-based follow-up study. SETTING: Urban. PARTICIPANTS: A cohort of 931 nondemented subjects, aged 75+ years from the Kungsholmen Project, Stockholm, examined twice over 6 years. MEASUREMENTS: Incident dementia cases were identified using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd-Edition Revised criteria. Primary occupations were assigned into categories according to the Nordic Occupational Classification and matched to the 1970 U.S. Census to score the level of work complexity with data, people, and things by using a preformed matrix. RESULTS: Lower dementia risk was associated with complexity of work with both data (age and gender adjusted relative risk [aRR]: 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75-0.95) and with people (aRR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.80-0.97). Adjusting for education led to similar results, although no longer statistically significant. Further, the highest degrees of complexity of work with data that involves analyzing, coordinating, and synthesizing data were associated with lower dementia risk even among lower educated subjects (relative risk: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.29-0.95). No gender differences were detected. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that work complexity with data and people is related to lower risk of dementia and that the highest levels of work complexity may modulate the higher dementia risk due to low education.
PubMed ID
19454849 View in PubMed
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