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Brucella Infection in Asian Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris lutris) on Bering Island, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284083
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 Jul 17;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-17-2017
Author
Tristan L Burgess
Christine Kreuder Johnson
Alexander Burdin
Verena A Gill
Angela M Doroff
Pamela Tuomi
Woutrina A Smith
Tracey Goldstein
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 Jul 17;
Date
Jul-17-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Infection with Brucella spp., long known as a cause of abortion, infertility, and reproductive loss in domestic livestock, has increasingly been documented in marine mammals over the past two decades. We report molecular evidence of Brucella infection in Asian sea otters (Enhydra lutris lutris). Brucella DNA was detected in 3 of 78 (4%) rectal swab samples collected between 2004 and 2006 on Bering Island, Russia. These 78 animals had previously been documented to have a Brucella seroprevalence of 28%, markedly higher than the prevalence documented in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in North America. All of the DNA sequences amplified were identical to one or more previously isolated Brucella spp. including strains from both terrestrial and marine hosts. Phylogenetic analysis of this sequence suggested that one animal was shedding Brucella spp. DNA with a sequence matching a Brucella abortus strain, whereas two animals yielded a sequence matching a group of strains including isolates classified as Brucella pinnipedialis and Brucella melitensis. Our results highlight the diversity of Brucella spp. within a single sea otter population.
PubMed ID
28715292 View in PubMed
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Brucella Infection in Asian Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris lutris) on Bering Island, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290856
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 10; 53(4):864-868
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
Tristan L Burgess
Christine Kreuder Johnson
Alexander Burdin
Verena A Gill
Angela M Doroff
Pamela Tuomi
Woutrina A Smith
Tracey Goldstein
Author Affiliation
1 Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, 1089 Veterinary Medicine Drive, Davis, California 95965, USA.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 10; 53(4):864-868
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Brucella - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
Female
Islands - epidemiology
Male
Markov Chains
Monte Carlo Method
Otters - microbiology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Rectum - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Infection with Brucella spp., long known as a cause of abortion, infertility, and reproductive loss in domestic livestock, has increasingly been documented in marine mammals over the past two decades. We report molecular evidence of Brucella infection in Asian sea otters (Enhydra lutris lutris). Brucella DNA was detected in 3 of 78 (4%) rectal swab samples collected between 2004 and 2006 on Bering Island, Russia. These 78 animals had previously been documented to have a Brucella seroprevalence of 28%, markedly higher than the prevalence documented in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in North America. All of the DNA sequences amplified were identical to one or more previously isolated Brucella spp. including strains from both terrestrial and marine hosts. Phylogenetic analysis of this sequence suggested that one animal was shedding Brucella spp. DNA with a sequence matching a Brucella abortus strain, whereas two animals yielded a sequence matching a group of strains including isolates classified as Brucella pinnipedialis and Brucella melitensis. Our results highlight the diversity of Brucella spp. within a single sea otter population.
PubMed ID
28715292 View in PubMed
Less detail

INFECTIOUS DISEASE AND TOXICOLOGICAL MONITORING OF STRANDED PACIFIC HARBOR SEALS (PHOCA VITULINA RICHARDSI) IN COOK INLET AS SURROGATES FOR MONITORING ENDANGERED BELUGAS (DELPHINAPTERUS LEUCAS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279087
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2016 Sep;47(3):770-780
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Kendra L Bauer
Caroline E C Goertz
Jane A Belovarac
Robert W Walton
J Lawrence Dunn
Pamela Tuomi
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2016 Sep;47(3):770-780
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - veterinary
Beluga Whale
Environmental monitoring
Female
Male
Parasitic Diseases, Animal - epidemiology
Phoca
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - veterinary
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Abstract
Pacific harbor seals ( Phoca vitulina richardsi) and belugas ( Delphinapterus leucas ) eat many of the same prey species, occupy the same geographic area, and demonstrate site fidelity in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Although most direct research involving the critically endangered belugas is currently prohibited, studying harbor seals may provide important information about this beluga population. In recent years, harbor seal populations in Alaska have declined for unknown reasons. As part of its stranding program, the Alaska SeaLife Center (ASLC) managed 59 cases of live and dead stranded harbor seals from Cook Inlet between 1997 and 2011. Animals were screened for a variety of diseases and contaminants of concern. Animals were negative by serology to the following diseases: avian influenza, canine distemper virus, dolphin morbillivirus, porpoise morbillivirus, Leptospira canicola, L. grippotyphosa, L. pomona, Neospora caninum , Sarcocystis neurona , and Toxoplasma gondii . Positive titers were found against Brucella spp., phocine distemper virus, seal herpesvirus-1, L. bratislava, L. hardjo, and L. icterohemorrhagiae. All titers were stable or declining except in one animal with an increasing titer for seal herpesvirus-1. Fecal pathogen screenings identified normal flora as well as stable or declining low levels of potentially pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria, though most were of little concern for seal health. In most animals, toxicology screening showed that the majority of tested contaminants were below detectable limits. The level of evidence of exposure to pathogens of concern was low in harbor seals. Although the infectious disease burden and contaminant levels in belugas in Cook Inlet cannot be definitively determined without direct testing, pathogen and contaminant exposure is expected to be similar to that found in harbor seals in this region, as the harbor seals and belugas share the habitat and food resources.
PubMed ID
27691941 View in PubMed
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