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Aajiiqatigiinniq: seeking solutions through collaboration

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284446
Source
Pages 21-24 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69(Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
OVERVIEW I: CIRCUMPOLAR HEALTH MOVEMENT - Overview I. Circumpolar Health Movement AAJllQATIGllNNIQ: SEEKING SOLUTIONS THROUGH COLLABORATION Pamela Orr, MD President, International Union for Circumpolar Health President, Canadian Society for Circumpolar Health Professor, Departments of
  1 document  
Author
Pamela Orr
Author Affiliation
President, International Union for Circumpolar Health
President, Canadian Society for Circumpolar Health
Professor, Departments of Medicine, Medical Microbiology and Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Canada
Source
Pages 21-24 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69(Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Overview I. Circumpolar Health Movement
Documents
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A Dene First Nation's community readiness assessment to take action against HIV/AIDS: a pilot project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299066
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 Dec; 78(1):1588092
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Linda Larcombe
Albert McLeod
Sarah Samuel
Jennifer Samuel
Michael Payne
Stephanie Van Haute
Matthew Singer
Laurie Ringaert
Adrienne F A Meyers
Kathi Kinew
Yoav Keynan
Kelly MacDonald
Joe Antsanen
Pamela Orr
Author Affiliation
a Max Rady College of Medicine , University of Manitoba , Winnipeg , Manitoba.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 Dec; 78(1):1588092
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Among Indigenous people in Canada the incidence of HIV is 3.5 times higher than other ethnicities. In Manitoba First Nations, Metis and Inuit people are disproportionately represented (40%) among people who are new to HIV care. Northlands Denesuline First Nation (NDFN) identified the need to revisit their level of knowledge and preparedness for responding to the increasing rates of HIV. NDFN piloted a community readiness assessment (CRA) tool to assess its appropriateness for use in northern Manitoba.
A First Nation and non-First Nation research team trained to administer the CRA tool at NDFN in Manitoba. Five informants were interviewed using the CRA tool and the responses were scored, analysed and reviewed at community workshops and with stakeholders to develop a 1-year action plan.
CRA training was best conducted in the community. Using the readiness score of 2.4 along with feedback from two workshops, community members, the research team and stakeholders, we identified priorities for adult education and youth involvement in programmes and planning.
In response to the increasing incidence of HIV, a northern First Nation community successfully modified and implemented a CRA tool to develop an action plan for culturally appropriate interventions and programmes.
PubMed ID
30935345 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake of vitamin D in a northern Canadian Dené First Nation community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107734
Source
Pages 766-773 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):766-773
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
]. Available from: http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/ 50. General Assembly of the United Nations. United N ations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. 2007 [cited 2012 Mar 7]. Available from: http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/ unpfii/documents/DRIPS_en.pdf *Pamela Orr Departments of Medicine
  1 document  
Author
Joyce Slater
Linda Larcombe
Chris Green
Caroline Slivinski
Matthew Singer
Lizette Denechezhe
Chris Whaley
Peter Nickerson
Pamela Orr
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
Source
Pages 766-773 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):766-773
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Seasons
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Increased awareness of the wide spectrum of activity of vitamin D has focused interest on its role in the health of Canada's Aboriginal peoples, who bear a high burden of both infectious and chronic disease. Cutaneous vitamin D synthesis is limited at northern latitudes, and the transition from nutrient-dense traditional to nutrient-poor market foods has left many Canadian Aboriginal populations food insecure and nutritionally vulnerable.
The study was undertaken to determine the level of dietary vitamin D in a northern Canadian Aboriginal (Dené) community and to determine the primary food sources of vitamin D.
Cross-sectional study.
Dietary vitamin D intakes of 46 adult Dené men and women were assessed using a food frequency questionnaire and compared across age, gender, season and body mass index. The adequacy of dietary vitamin D intake was assessed using the 2007 Adequate Intake (AI) and the 2011 Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) values for Dietary Reference Intake (DRI).
Mean daily vitamin D intake was 271.4 IU in winter and 298.3 IU in summer. Forty percent and 47.8% of participants met the vitamin D 1997 AI values in winter and summer, respectively; this dropped to 11.1 and 13.0% in winter and summer using 2011 RDA values. Supplements, milk, and local fish were positively associated with adequate vitamin D intake. Milk and local fish were the major dietary sources of vitamin D.
Dietary intake of vitamin D in the study population was low. Only 2 food sources, fluid milk and fish, provided the majority of dietary vitamin D. Addressing low vitamin D intake in this population requires action aimed at food insecurity present in northern Aboriginal populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984265 View in PubMed
Documents
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Evaluation of 24 locus MIRU-VNTR genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146225
Source
Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2010 Jan;90(1):31-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Sara Christianson
Joyce Wolfe
Pamela Orr
James Karlowsky
Paul N Levett
Greg B Horsman
Louise Thibert
Patrick Tang
Meenu K Sharma
Author Affiliation
National Microbiology Laboratory, 1015 Arlington Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3R2, Canada. sara_christianson@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2010 Jan;90(1):31-8
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Canada - epidemiology
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Minisatellite Repeats
Molecular Epidemiology
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics - isolation & purification
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Reproducibility of Results
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
The current gold standard for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotyping is insertion sequence (IS) 6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) as it provides the highest discriminatory power of all available MTBC genotyping methods. However, RFLP is labour intensive and the interpretation of data from this method can be susceptible to errors. In 2001 a rapid, reproducible variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) based typing method using 12 mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU) was developed. Despite this advancement, this method lacked the discriminatory power of IS6110-RFLP. More recently a set of 24 MIRU-VNTR loci was reported to have greater discriminatory power than the original 12 locus system and may exceed that of RFLP when combined with spoligotyping. We compared the 24 locus method to the 12 locus method in order to improve surveillance of tuberculosis in Canada. A random sample of 650 MTBC isolates from British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Quebec Canada was genotyped using the 24 MIRU loci. Comparison of the data for the 12 and 24 MIRU loci showed an increase of the Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index (HGDI) from 0.895 (12 loci) to 0.920 (24 loci). The implementation of the 24 locus MIRU-VNTR methods offers improvement in discriminatory power over the traditional 12 locus method. For long-term surveillance of MTBC within Canada, the use of 24 MIRU-VNTR loci will provide rapid, highly discriminatory molecular epidemiology information.
PubMed ID
20056488 View in PubMed
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Housing conditions in 2 Canadian First Nations communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134943
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):141-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Linda Larcombe
Peter Nickerson
Matthew Singer
Robert Robson
Joseph Dantouze
Lloyd McKay
Pamela Orr
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0J9, Canada. llarcombe@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):141-53
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Housing - standards
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American
Manitoba
Risk assessment
Tuberculosis - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
Housing conditions were assessed in 2 Canadian First Nations communities. Possible associations with tuberculosis (TB) were explored. Study design. Participatory community-based survey.
Qualitative and quantitative data on housing and health were collected in the northern Dené community at Lac Brochet (LB), which has experienced endemic and epidemic TB, and the southern Ojibwa community at Valley River (VR), which has not. Results. 72 of 135 (53%) houses at LB and 57 of 95 (60%) houses at VR were enrolled. Houses in both communities were small (mean 882 and 970 sq. ft., respectively) compared to the Manitoba average (1,200 sq. ft.). Crowding was evident at LB (mean persons per room [ppr] 1.1) and VR (mean ppr 0.9). The provincial mean ppr is 0.5. However, only 49% of householders at LB and 19% at VR felt "crowded" in their homes. More than two-thirds of houses had absent or non-functional heat recovery ventilation systems. Mould was observed in 44% of LB houses and 19% of VR houses. At LB a significant association was found between the number of permanent residents in the house and the presence of selfreported latent or active TB, either currently or during residence in that house (p=0.001).
Houses that were studied in these 2 First Nations communities were predominantly small, crowded and in poor repair. An association was found between the number of persons in a house and self-reported TB. Improved housing conditions in First Nations communities are indicated to promote and sustain health as well as human and Indigenous rights.
PubMed ID
21524357 View in PubMed
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Marked disparity in the epidemiology of tuberculosis among Aboriginal peoples on the Canadian prairies: the challenges and opportunities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113504
Source
Can Respir J. 2013 Jul-Aug;20(4):223-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Richard Long
Vernon Hoeppner
Pamela Orr
Martha Ainslie
Malcolm King
Sylvia Abonyi
Maria Mayan
Dennis Kunimoto
Deanne Langlois-Klassen
Courtney Heffernan
Angela Lau
Dick Menzies
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton. richard.long@ualberta.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2013 Jul-Aug;20(4):223-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Censuses
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
While it is established that Aboriginal peoples in the prairie provinces of Canada are disproportionately affected by tuberculosis (TB), little is known about the epidemiology of TB either within or across provincial borders.
Provincial reporting systems for TB, Statistics Canada censuses and population estimates of Registered Indians provided by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada were used to estimate the overall (2004 to 2008) and pulmonary (2007 to 2008) TB rates in the prairie provinces. The place of residence at diagnosis of pulmonary TB cases in 2007 to 2008 was also documented.
The age- and sex-adjusted incidence of TB in Registered Indians was 52.6 per 100,000 person-years, 38 times higher than in Canadian-born 'others'. Incidence rates in Registered Indians were highest in Manitoba and lowest in Alberta. In Alberta and Saskatchewan, on-reserve rates were more than twice that of off-reserve rates. Rates in the Métis and Registered Indians were similar in Saskatchewan (50.0 and 52.2 per 100,000 person-years, respectively). In 2007 to 2008, approximately 90% of Canadian-born pulmonary TB cases in the prairie provinces were Aboriginal. Outside of one metropolitan area (Winnipeg, Manitoba), most Registered Indian and Métis pulmonary TB cases were concentrated in a relatively small number of communities north of the 53rd parallel. Rates of pulmonary TB in 11 of these communities were >300 per 100,000 person-years. In Manitoba, 49% of off-reserve Registered Indian pulmonary cases were linked to high-incidence reserve communities.
The epidemiology of TB among Aboriginal peoples on the Canadian prairies is markedly disparate. Pulmonary TB is highly focal, which is both a concern and an opportunity.
Notes
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Comment In: Can Respir J. 2013 Jul-Aug;20(4):22123936879
PubMed ID
23717818 View in PubMed
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Old and new infectious agents, old and new control strategies

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284471
Source
Pages 77-78 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND SEXUAL HEALTH @@\jjijQ OLD AND NEW INFECTIOUS AGENTS, OLD AND NEW CONTROL STRATEGIES Pamela Orr, MD Professor, Departments of Medicine, Medical Microbiology and Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba Winni peg, Manitoba, Canada The health of
  1 document  
Author
Pamela Orr
Author Affiliation
Professor, Departments of Medicine, Medical Microbiology and Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Source
Pages 77-78 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Otitis media and the epidemiologic triangle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6327
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):2-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Pamela Orr
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):2-3
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Arctic Regions
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Incidence
Otitis Media with Effusion - epidemiology - microbiology
Penicillin resistance
Risk assessment
Streptococcus pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Notes
Comment On: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):16-2515776989
Comment On: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):5-1515776988
PubMed ID
15776987 View in PubMed
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Tuberculosis in Nunavut: looking back, moving forward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116581
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Mar 5;185(4):287-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-2013
Author
Pamela Orr
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology and Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man. porr@hsc.mb.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Mar 5;185(4):287-8
Date
Mar-5-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Mass Screening
Nunavut - epidemiology
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Tuberculosis - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-1421041430
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PubMed ID
23382256 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D in a northern Canadian first nation population: dietary intake, serum concentrations and functional gene polymorphisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118637
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e49872
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Linda Larcombe
Neeloffer Mookherjee
Joyce Slater
Caroline Slivinski
Matthew Singer
Chris Whaley
Lizette Denechezhe
Sara Matyas
Emily Turner-Brannen
Peter Nickerson
Pamela Orr
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. llarcombe@hsc.mb.ca
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e49872
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Canada
Chronic Disease
Diet
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Population
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Risk factors
Seasons
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood - genetics - metabolism
Vitamin D Deficiency - genetics - metabolism
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - genetics
Abstract
The wide spectrum of vitamin D activity has focused attention on its potential role in the elevated burden of disease in a northern Canadian First Nations (Dené) cohort. Vitamin D insufficiency, and gene polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) have been implicated in susceptibility to infectious and chronic diseases. The objectives of this study were to determine the contribution of vitamin D from food, and measure the serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25-OHD(3)) and VDBP in Dené participants. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the dysregulation of the innate immune response were typed and counted. Potential correlations between the SNPs and serum concentrations of 25-OHD(3) and VDBP were evaluated. Venous blood was collected in summer and winter over a one-year period and analyzed for 25-OHD(3) and VDBP concentrations (N?=?46). A questionnaire was administered to determine the amount of dietary vitamin D consumed. Sixty-one percent and 30% of the participants had 25-OHD(3) serum concentrations
Notes
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PubMed ID
23185470 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.