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6 records – page 1 of 1.

25-hydroxyvitamin D levels among healthy children in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4777
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Bradford D Gessner
Julia Plotnik
Pam T Muth
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, PO Box 240249, 3601 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Breast Feeding
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine vitamin D levels among children 6 to 23 months old receiving services from Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) programs in Alaska.Study design During 2001 and 2002, we recruited 133 children receiving services at seven WIC clinics, administered a risk factor questionnaire, and collected blood. RESULTS: Fifteen (11%) and 26 (20%) children, respectively, had vitamin D levels or =25 ng/mL. Among 41 still breast-feeding children, 14 (34%) took supplemental vitamins, and six (18%) were reported to have received vitamins every day. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in Alaska. Breast-feeding in the absence of adequate vitamin D supplementation is the greatest risk factor.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):422-314571210
PubMed ID
14571215 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic Helicobacter pylori Infection and Iron Deficiency are Not Associated With Decreased Growth Among Alaska Native Children Aged 7-11 Years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76172
Source
Helicobacter. 2006 Jun;11(3):159-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Marc-Andre R Chimonas
Henry C Baggett
Alan J Parkinson
Pam T Muth
Eitel Dunaway
Bradford D Gessner
Author Affiliation
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Workforce and Career Development, Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
Source
Helicobacter. 2006 Jun;11(3):159-67
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract Introduction: Alaska Native children have high Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency prevalences, and their average height-for-age is lower than US reference populations. During a clinical trial to determine the impact of H. pylori treatment on iron deficiency, we evaluated the effects of H. pylori infection and treatment on growth. Materials and Methods: We measured height and weight for children aged 7-11 years in western Alaska using village-based measuring devices. H. pylori infection was determined by urea breath test and iron deficiency using serum ferritin. Children with H. pylori infection and iron deficiency entered the treatment phase and received iron alone or iron plus triple therapy for H. pylori. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 2, 8, and 14 months. We evaluated the association between baseline H. pylori infection and growth; among children in the treatment phase, we also assessed the effect of H. pylori resolution on growth. Results: At baseline, 566 (87.1%) of 650 children were infected with H. pylori. Neither height and weight, nor body mass index differed by H. pylori infection status. Of 189 children in the treatment phase, 20 (10.6%) were uninfected at all three follow-up periods, and 54 (28.6%) were uninfected for one or two periods. Compared with continuously infected children, children in these two groups had little evidence of improvements in any of the measured growth outcomes. Conclusions: H. pylori infection is not related to growth among Alaska Native children aged 7-11 years. Growth deficiency should not be considered an indication for H. pylori therapy.
PubMed ID
16684263 View in PubMed
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A controlled, household-randomized, open-label trial of the effect that treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection has on iron deficiency in children in rural Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29244
Source
J Infect Dis. 2006 Feb 15;193(4):537-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2006
Author
Bradford D Gessner
Henry C Baggett
Pam T Muth
Eitel Dunaway
Benjamin D Gold
Ziding Feng
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Section of Epidemiology, Alaska Division of Public Health, National Center for Infectious Diseases, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
J Infect Dis. 2006 Feb 15;193(4):537-46
Date
Feb-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency are prevalent in disadvantaged populations worldwide. Previous small or uncontrolled studies have reported that successful treatment of H. pylori infection may resolve iron deficiency or anemia. METHODS: We screened 68% of children 7-11 years old living in 10 western Alaska villages. The 219 children with iron deficiency (serum ferritin level,
PubMed ID
16425133 View in PubMed
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Endemic iron deficiency associated with Helicobacter pylori infection among school-aged children in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6596
Source
Pediatrics. 2006 Mar;117(3):e396-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Henry C Baggett
Alan J Parkinson
Pam T Muth
Benjamin D Gold
Bradford D Gessner
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, Alaska. hbaggett@cdc.gov
Source
Pediatrics. 2006 Mar;117(3):e396-404
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - complications - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Female
Helicobacter Infections - complications - epidemiology - ethnology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Inuits
Iron - deficiency
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Rural Alaska Natives have a high prevalence of iron deficiency and Helicobacter pylori infection. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron-deficiency anemia, and active H pylori infection among school-aged children in rural Alaska. METHODS: We enrolled 68% (688) of the 7- to 11-year-old children from 10 predominantly Alaska Native villages in southwestern Alaska. We collected venous blood samples to assess iron deficiency and anemia. Each child was tested for active H pylori infection by 13C-urea breath test (UBT). Evaluated risk factors included age, gender, village of residence, number of household members, number of household members who were younger than 5 years, recent antibiotic use, and household water source. RESULTS: Of 688 enrolled children, iron deficiency was present in 38%, iron-deficiency anemia was present in 7.8%, and H pylori infection by UBT was present in 86%. Iron deficiency was independently associated with living in a household with >6 people and village of residence. H pylori infection by UBT was independently associated with child's age > or =10 years and village of residence. Ninety-one percent of children with iron deficiency had H pylori infection by UBT, and children with active H pylori infection were more likely to be iron deficient than uninfected children. Children with H pylori infection by UBT were also more likely to have iron-deficiency anemia than uninfected children. CONCLUSIONS: In this study of nearly 700 children in 10 different villages in Alaska, we confirmed that the high prevalence of iron deficiency persists among school-aged children. We found that active H pylori infection was independently associated with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia among children in this region. H pylori infection may account for a portion of the iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia in rural Alaska and other areas with high prevalences of both conditions. Innovative approaches are critically needed to address the iron deficiency in high prevalence areas such as rural Alaska and most of the developing world.
PubMed ID
16452320 View in PubMed
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The incidence of infant physical abuse in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5097
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Jan;28(1):9-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Bradford D Gessner
Martha Moore
Bernita Hamilton
Pam T Muth
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Maternal, Child, and Family Health, Anchorage, AK 99524-0249, USA.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Jan;28(1):9-23
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of and risk factors associated with infant (
Notes
Comment In: Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Jan;28(1):7-815019435
PubMed ID
15019436 View in PubMed
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A randomized trial of triple therapy for pediatric Helicobacter pylori infection and risk factors for treatment failure in a population with a high prevalence of infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29422
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Nov 1;41(9):1261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2005
Author
Bradford D Gessner
Michael G Bruce
Alan J Parkinson
Benjamin D Gold
Pam T Muth
Eitel Dunaway
Henry C Baggett
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, National Center for Infectious Diseases, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Nov 1;41(9):1261-8
Date
Nov-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few trials of treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection have been conducted in high-prevalence or pediatric populations, and risk factors for treatment failure are poorly understood. METHODS: As part of a study evaluating the effect of H. pylori therapy on iron deficiency, we conducted a household-randomized, open-label treatment trial involving children aged 7-11 years in 10 villages in western Alaska. We screened 690 children, of whom 219 with iron deficiency and H. pylori infection (determined on the basis of positive results of the 13C urea breath test) were enrolled in the treatment phase of the study. These 219 children received treatment with iron sulfate alone (the control group) or with iron sulfate combined with a 2-week course of lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin (the intervention group). Children in the intervention group who were allergic to amoxicillin or macrolides received metronidazole. Children in the intervention group who did not respond to treatment were re-treated with a 2-week course of metronidazole-based quadruple therapy. RESULTS: Two months after initiating therapy, 34% of 104 children in the intervention group and 0.90% of 111 children in the control group tested negative for H. pylori. Among children in the intervention group, risk factors for treatment failure were lack of metronidazole (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 145), fewer treatment doses (aOR, 0.74), larger household population (aOR, 1.5), and lower body mass index (aOR, 0.69). These 4 variables predicted most of the variation in H. pylori infection status. Among 50 children who were re-treated, 84% tested negative for H. pylori at the 8-month follow-up visit, including those with poor treatment compliance. CONCLUSIONS: Among disadvantaged populations with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, the response to standard treatment regimens may be low. Treatment compliance, household crowding, and re-treatment may influence treatment success. Metronidazole may be appropriate first-line therapy.
PubMed ID
16206100 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.