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A 5-year follow-up study of disease incidence in men with an abnormal hormone pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47352
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
R. Rosmond
S. Wallerius
P. Wanger
L. Martin
G. Holm
P. Björntorp
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Institute, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Cerebrovascular Accident - epidemiology - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - analysis
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Hypertension - epidemiology - metabolism
Incidence
Insulin - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have suggested that abnormal levels of cortisol and testosterone might increase the risk of serious somatic diseases. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a 5-year follow-up study in middle-aged men. METHODS: A population-based cohort study conducted in 1995 amongst 141 Swedish men born in 1944, in whom a clinical examination supplemented by medical history aimed to disclose the presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke), type 2 diabetes and hypertension were performed at baseline and at follow-up in the year 2000. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were measured repeatedly over the day. Serum testosterone concentrations were also determined. Using the baseline data, an algorithm was constructed, which classified the secretion pattern of cortisol and testosterone from each individual as being normal or abnormal. RESULTS: By the end of follow-up, men with an abnormal hormone secretion pattern (n = 73) had elevated mean arterial pressure (P = 0.003), fasting insulin (P = 0.009) and insulin : glucose ratio (P = 0.005) compared with men with a normal secretion pattern (n = 68). Body mass index, waist circumference, and waist : hip ratio were significantly elevated in both groups. However, the 5-year incidence of CVD, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
12974877 View in PubMed
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Aminophylline in bradyasystolic cardiac arrest: a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169285
Source
Lancet. 2006 May 13;367(9522):1577-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-2006
Author
Riyad B Abu-Laban
Caroline M McIntyre
James M Christenson
Catherina A van Beek
Grant D Innes
Robin K O'Brien
Karen P Wanger
R Douglas McKnight
Kenneth G Gin
Peter J Zed
Jeffrey Watts
Joe Puskaric
Iain A MacPhail
Ross G Berringer
Ruth A Milner
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. abulaban@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Lancet. 2006 May 13;367(9522):1577-84
Date
May-13-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Aminophylline - therapeutic use
Bradycardia - complications
British Columbia
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Heart Arrest - drug therapy - etiology - mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Endogenous adenosine might cause or perpetuate bradyasystole. Our aim was to determine whether aminophylline, an adenosine antagonist, increases the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
In a double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 971 patients older than 16 years with asystole or pulseless electrical activity at fewer than 60 beats per minute, and who were unresponsive to initial treatment with epinephrine and atropine, to receive intravenous aminophylline (250 mg, and an additional 250 mg if necessary) (n=486) or placebo (n=485). The patients were enrolled between January, 2001 and September, 2003, from 1886 people who had had cardiac arrests. Standard resuscitation measures were used for at least 10 mins after the study drug was administered. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. This trial is registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov registry with the number NCT00312273.
Baseline characteristics and survival predictors were similar in both groups. The median time from the arrival of the advanced life-support paramedic team to study drug administration was 13 min. The proportion of patients who had an ROSC was 24.5% in the aminophylline group and 23.7% in the placebo group (difference 0.8%; 95% CI -4.6% to 6.2%; p=0.778). The proportion of patients with non-sinus tachyarrhythmias after study drug administration was 34.6% in the aminophylline group and 26.2% in the placebo group (p=0.004). Survival to hospital admission and survival to hospital discharge were not significantly different between the groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed no evidence of a significant subgroup or interactive effect from aminophylline.
Although aminophylline increases non-sinus tachyarrhythmias, we noted no evidence that it significantly increases the proportion of patients who achieve ROSC after bradyasystolic cardiac arrest.
Notes
Comment In: CJEM. 2007 Jan;9(1):26-917391597
PubMed ID
16698410 View in PubMed
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Instant photographic refractometry in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38521
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1988 Apr;66(2):165-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1988
Author
P. Wanger
G. Waern
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1988 Apr;66(2):165-9
Date
Apr-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Photography - methods
Refractive Errors - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
A simple photographic method for detection and measurement of refractive errors in children, using a specially designed camera and electronic flash unit and 'instant' (Polaroid) film, was tested on 64 children, aged 3 to 8 years, and compared with the results from retinoscopy. The refractive errors ranged from -6.5 to +6.5 D. A light reflex in the pupil was observed on the photos of all children with hyperopia greater than = 0.5 and myopia greater than = 2.0 D. A curvilinear relationship was observed (in the range -2 to -4 and +0.5 to +3 D) between the width of the light reflex in the pupil, easily measured on the photos and the degree of refractive error, determined by retinoscopy. The degree of ametropia could be estimated with reasonable accuracy (+/- 0.5 D) in the interval from -2 to -4 D and +0.5 to +3 D. The method can demonstrate the type and, to a limited extent, also the degree of refraction anomaly and may be of value in screening for refractive errors in children.
PubMed ID
3389090 View in PubMed
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Management of ocular hypertension and open angle glaucoma: clinical practice and computer-assisted decision-making.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206126
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1997 Dec;75(6):700-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
P. Wanger
L. Martin
Author Affiliation
Glaucoma Service, St. Erik's Eye Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1997 Dec;75(6):700-4
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Feasibility Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Intraocular Pressure
Middle Aged
Ocular Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the feasibility of computerized decision support in the management of patients with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.
Based on a Swedish consensus document a computer program was developed, which provided one of 25 different recommendations for appropriate action. In 373 patient visits to seven different eye clinics, the program's recommendations were compared to the actual decisions made by the responsible ophthalmologists.
Notable differences were observed between the clinics' management strategies, especially regarding follow-up frequency and start or increase of anti-glaucoma treatment. The program's recommendations conformed with the clinical decisions in 23 to 92% of the cases when a standard management strategy was simulated. The concordance increased to 93 to 100%, when policy differences between the clinics were taken into account.
Clinical decision-making in the management of patients with ocular hypertension or open angle glaucoma can be implemented in a computer program. The optimum management protocol remains to be defined.
PubMed ID
9527335 View in PubMed
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