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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Cellular drug sensitivity in MLL-rearranged childhood acute leukaemia is correlated to partner genes and cell lineage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17095
Source
Br J Haematol. 2005 Apr;129(2):189-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
J. Palle
B M Frost
E. Forestier
G. Gustafsson
P. Nygren
M. Hellebostad
O G Jonsson
J. Kanerva
K. Schmiegelow
R. Larsson
G. Lönnerholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. josefine.palle@akademiska.se
Source
Br J Haematol. 2005 Apr;129(2):189-98
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology
Cell Lineage
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9
Comparative Study
Cytarabine - pharmacology
Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Doxorubicin - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Neoplasm - genetics
Female
Fluorometry
Gene Rearrangement
Glucocorticoids - pharmacology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1 - genetics - immunology
Leukemia, Myeloid - genetics - immunology
Male
Myeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Protein
Prospective Studies
Proto-Oncogenes - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Transcription Factors - genetics
Translocation, Genetic
Abstract
Rearrangements in the 11q23 region, the site of the mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) gene, are found in both childhood acute myeloid (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukaemia. We studied the in vitro drug resistance by the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) in 132 children with AML and 178 children with ALL (aged 0-17 years). In AML, children with t(9;11) (n = 10) were significantly more sensitive to cytarabine (P
PubMed ID
15813846 View in PubMed
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[Cytostatic therapy in cancer--a SBU report]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19789
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1905-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2001
Author
B. Glimelius
P. Nygren
G. Lamnevik
Author Affiliation
Onkologiska kliniken, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala. bengt.glimelius@onkologi.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1905-10
Date
Apr-18-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Costs
English Abstract
Humans
Neoplasms - drug therapy - economics - psychology
Practice Guidelines
Quality of Life
Abstract
A report by The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) has reviewed, classified, and graded the scientific literature on cancer chemotherapy in some major tumor types, described the practice of chemotherapy in Sweden, compared practice with scientific knowledge, and analyzed the costs and cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy. This article summarizes the overall conclusions. The literature on the effects of chemotherapy is extensive. Chemotherapy has a well-documented role in the curative and palliative treatment of patients with several types of cancer. In Sweden, chemotherapy is used largely in keeping with applications documented in the scientific literature.
PubMed ID
11370407 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Oncol. 2001;40(2-3):412-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
G. Karlsson
P. Nygren
B. Glimelius
Author Affiliation
Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2001;40(2-3):412-33
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiemetics - economics - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - economics - therapeutic use
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Neoplasms - drug therapy - economics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Abstract
A systematic review of the effect of chemotherapy in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The review also included an assessment of the limited number of studies available on the health economics of chemotherapy for diagnoses included in the SBU report. The conclusions reached from this assessment can be summarized as follows: Several international studies and one Swedish study addressed the cost-effectiveness of different chemotherapeutic regimens. The quality of the studies is generally low and comparability is rather limited. Some of the studies compared cytostatic treatment with no cytostatic treatment. Most studies, however, compared two or more treatments. The costs were then compared with potential differences in treatment outcome. Outcomes are mostly measured as the cost per life-year gained. The results from these studies vary by treatment and indication. In some cases, after all relevant costs are taken into account, chemotherapy shows cost savings. In most studies, chemotherapy is associated both with higher costs and improved treatment results, often measured in terms of survival. Studies of rather high quality show that the cost per life-year gained (quality-adjusted) for most chemotherapeutic regimens with relatively limited effects ranges between 100,000 and 250,000 Swedish kronor (SEK). Estimates of cost-effectiveness for more effective chemotherapy has not been reported in the literature. The estimated costs are in parity with the costs of 'established' treatments for other diseases. There is uncertainty about what treatments can be considered cost-effective; there is no consensus concerning what costs are 'reasonable' per life-year gained in health care. The estimates of cost-effectiveness in most studies are highly uncertain and must be interpreted with caution. Improved assessment would require more studies in Sweden. For various reasons it is difficult to apply the results from the international studies to Sweden.
PubMed ID
11441944 View in PubMed
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[Evidence-based use of the PET in cancer diagnosis?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20346
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 31;97(22):2776, 2779
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-31-2000
Author
P. Nygren
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 31;97(22):2776, 2779
Date
May-31-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Neoplasms - economics - radionuclide imaging
Sweden
Tomography, Emission-Computed - economics
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 2000 Apr 19;97(16):1946-810826352
PubMed ID
10900901 View in PubMed
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Hope for a cure and altruism are the main motives behind participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277359
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2015;24(1):133-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
T. Godskesen
M G Hansson
P. Nygren
K. Nordin
U. Kihlbom
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2015;24(1):133-41
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Altruism
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic
Comprehension
Female
Hope
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation - physiology
Neoplasms - drug therapy - psychology
Patient Participation - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
It is necessary to carry out randomised clinical cancer trials (RCTs) in order to evaluate new, potentially useful treatments for future cancer patients. Participation in clinical trials plays an important role in determining whether a new treatment is the best therapy or not. Therefore, it is important to understand on what basis patients decide to participate in clinical trials and to investigate the implications of this understanding for optimising the information process related to study participation. The aims of this study were to (1) describe motives associated with participation in RCTs, (2) assess if patients comprehend the information related to trial enrolment, and (3) describe patient experiences of trial participation. Questionnaires were sent to 96 cancer patients participating in one of nine ongoing clinical phase 3 trials at the Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden. Eighty-eight patients completed the questionnaire (response rate 92%); 95% of these were patients in adjuvant therapy and 5% participated in clinical trials on palliative care. Two main reasons for participation were identified: personal hope for a cure and altruism. Patients show adequate understanding of the information provided to them in the consent process and participation entails high patient satisfaction.
PubMed ID
24467443 View in PubMed
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The initial change in tumor size predicts response and survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with combination chemotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101255
Source
Ann Oncol. 2011 Aug 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2011
Author
C. Suzuki
L. Blomqvist
A. Sundin
H. Jacobsson
P. Byström
A. Berglund
P. Nygren
B. Glimelius
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institution for Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
Ann Oncol. 2011 Aug 10;
Date
Aug-10-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To determine whether the change in tumor diameters at the first follow-up computed tomography (CT) examination after baseline examination (first change) correlates with outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with combination chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The first change was analyzed in a multicenter randomized phase III trial (Nordic VI, N = 567) comparing first-line irinotecan with either bolus or infused 5-fluorouracil. Cox proportional hazards multiple regression model and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses after correction for guarantee-time bias were carried out to evaluate correlations between first change, objective response according to RECIST 1.0, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: The hazard ratios for PFS and OS decreased along with first change. A decrease between 10% and 20%. CONCLUSIONS: The change in tumor size at the first follow-up CT is strongly prognostic for PFS and OS in mCRC.
PubMed ID
21832285 View in PubMed
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In vitro cytotoxic drug activity and in vivo pharmacokinetics in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20797
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;457:429-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
G. Lönnerholm
B M Frost
R. Larsson
E. Liliemark
P. Nygren
C. Peterson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;457:429-35
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amsacrine - toxicity
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacokinetics - therapeutic use - toxicity
Blast Crisis - pathology
Bone Marrow - pathology
Cell Survival - drug effects
Child
Cytarabine - toxicity
Doxorubicin - toxicity
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Etoposide - toxicity
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Thioguanine - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Abstract
Since May 1996 all Nordic countries have been participating in a study of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim is to correlate the in vitro sensitivity of leukemic cells and individual plasma concentrations of cytotoxic drugs with clinical effect. Blast cells from bone marrow and/or peripheral blood are tested against a panel of cytotoxic agents using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA). Plasma concentrations of cytotoxic drugs are analysed during induction therapy. Bone marrow samples from the participating centres generally reached the analysing laboratory within 24 hours. 61 out of 71 (86%) samples were successfully analysed, 47 de novo AML and 14 relapses. Relapsing patients tended to have a more resistant test profile than newly diagnosed patients. Steady state plasma levels of doxorubicin, etoposide and 6-thioguanine nucleotide varied about 10-fold between patients. The intra-individual variation was much less, suggesting that dose adjustment based on pharmacokinetic data might be useful in the future.
PubMed ID
10500819 View in PubMed
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Is in vitro sensitivity of blast cells correlated to therapeutic effect in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20798
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;457:423-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
B M Frost
R. Larsson
P. Nygren
G. Lönnerholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;457:423-8
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use - toxicity
Automation
Blast Crisis - pathology
Bone Marrow Cells - pathology
Cell Survival
Child
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor - methods
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1 - drug therapy - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Our aim is to study whether or not in vitro sensitivity of leukemic cells correlates with clinical effect; if so, in vitro testing might used for stratification of treatment. During 1995-1997 bone marrow samples from 145 Swedish children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia were analysed by the automated fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay. Therapeutic effect was evaluated by bone marrow morphology day 15 and 29. Preliminary results indicate that marrow samples from patients with poor response to induction therapy show a higher degree of in vitro resistance to several cytotoxic drugs at diagnosis than good responders.
PubMed ID
10500818 View in PubMed
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Outcome differences between debulking surgery and cytoreductive surgery in patients with Pseudomyxoma peritonei.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122494
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2012 Oct;38(10):962-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
H. Andréasson
W. Graf
P. Nygren
B. Glimelius
H. Mahteme
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Surgery, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. hakan.andreasson@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2012 Oct;38(10):962-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Biopsy, Needle
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Digestive System Surgical Procedures - methods - mortality
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Infusions, Parenteral
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness - pathology
Neoplasm Staging
Odds Ratio
Peritoneal Neoplasms - drug therapy - mortality - pathology - surgery
Peritoneum - surgery
Pseudomyxoma Peritonei - drug therapy - mortality - pathology - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare debulking surgery and cytoreductive surgery (CRS) in patients with Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) regarding efficacy and safety.
Data were extracted from medical records and treatment outcomes were analyzed for all 152 patients with PMP who were scheduled for debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) or CRS and IPC at Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, between September 1993 and December 2008.
One hundred and ten patients (73%) were treated with CRS and IPC and 40 (27%) with debulking surgery and IPC. In two patients (1%), surgery was defined as open and close. Patients with CRS and IPC had a 74% 5-year overall survival (OS) rate compared with 40% for those treated with debulking surgery (P
PubMed ID
22809859 View in PubMed
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A prospective study of the use of chemotherapy in Sweden and assessment of the use in relation to scientific evidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19692
Source
Acta Oncol. 2001;40(2-3):391-411
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P. Ragnhammar
B. Brorsson
P. Nygren
B. Glimelius
Author Affiliation
Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, Sweden. pragnhammar@amgen.com
Source
Acta Oncol. 2001;40(2-3):391-411
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Delivery of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Drug Therapy - utilization
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
A prospective study on total utilisation of cytotoxic drugs for selected cancers was carried out in two Swedish health service regions, during four weeks in the autumn of 1997. The study included 1,590 patients; 1,169 with solid tumours and 421 with haematological malignancies. The majority of patients (75% to 80%) were treated at university/regional hospitals, often at oncology or haematology departments, and most received treatment as outpatients. Furthermore, most were treated according to recommendations in regional or national clinical guidelines, so-called care programmes, although the percentage varied by diagnosis. Only 10% were participants in a clinical trial. In approximately 40% of the patients, treatment was aimed at cure. However, this percentage varied between 0% and 94% depending on tumour type. At the population level, a comparison of the scientific evidence according to a literature review (Acta Oncol, this issue) with the survey showed that treatment with cytotoxic drugs in Sweden was largely evidence-based. A high percentage of patients received cytotoxic drugs for diseases where recommendations to treat were strong, i.e. outcomes were well-documented in the literature. A low percentage of patients received chemotherapy in disease settings with little or no scientific documentation. The percentage of patients treated was also limited in cases where the effects of chemotherapy are relatively small, although scientifically well-documented. For methodological reasons, one cannot exclude the possibility that cytotoxic drugs may be overutilised at the individual level for palliative purposes, e.g. by not discontinuing treatment despite the absence of clinical benefits. Likewise, one cannot exclude the possibility of underutilisation, e.g. by patients declining treatment because they were not informed about the potential benefits.
PubMed ID
11441943 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.