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[An 8-month-long controlled trial of low fat/high fiber diet. Effect on blood lipids and blood pressure in young healthy individuals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221230
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Apr 26;155(17):1289-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1993
Author
B. Sandström
P. Marckmann
N. Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Landbohøjskolen, Forskningsinstitut for Human Ernaering, Frederiksberg.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Apr 26;155(17):1289-93
Date
Apr-26-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Blood pressure
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Time Factors
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jul 19;155(29):2288-98392231
PubMed ID
8389495 View in PubMed
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An eight-month controlled study of a low-fat high-fibre diet: effects on blood lipids and blood pressure in healthy young subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62169
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992 Feb;46(2):95-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
B. Sandström
P. Marckmann
N. Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992 Feb;46(2):95-109
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Dietary Fats - pharmacology
Dietary Fiber - pharmacology
Energy intake
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The effects on blood lipids and blood pressure of a diet corresponding to present Nordic Nutrition Recommendations, i.e. less than 30% of energy from fat and with a fibre content exceeding 3 g/MJ, were studied in 18 men and 12 women (mean age, 24 years) under strict dietary control over 8 months. Blood sampling, blood pressure and body weight measurement were performed at four occasions on their habitual diet and once a month during the intervention period. An age-matched control group (17 men, 8 women) was followed with monthly measurements parallel to the intervention group. The habitual diets, assessed by 7-day records, showed an average fat content corresponding to 36% of energy. Initial levels of total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol (X +/- SD) were 4.21 +/- 0.61 and 1.23 +/- 0.23 mmol/l for the men in the intervention group; 4.35 +/- 0.79 and 1.21 +/- 0.26 mmol/l for the male controls; 4.61 +/- 0.59 and 1.46 +/- 0.31 mmol/l for the women in the intervention group and 4.48 +/- 0.64 and 1.48 +/- 0.29 mmol/l for the female controls. Significantly decreased levels of total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol throughout the experimental period were seen for both sexes in the intervention group. Total cholesterol fell 0.49 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.41-0.56) in the male subjects and 0.49 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.39-0.59) in the female subjects. The fall in HDL cholesterol was 0.16 mmol/l (95% C: 0.13-0.18) and 0.18 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.12-0.23), respectively. Total cholesterol changes were independent of initial values. All subjects were normotensive at the start of the study with an average blood pressure of 122/68 mmHg for men and 112/68 mmHg for the women. Systolic blood pressure dropped gradually and significantly in the male subjects of the intervention group. A minimum of 6 mmHg below initial values was noted after six months of dietary intervention. No significant changes in dietary intake and blood lipids were observed in the control group. Thus, changes of present dietary habits of young healthy Danish subjects to an intake in accordance with the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 1989 will favourably affect suggested risk factors for disease.
PubMed ID
1313761 View in PubMed
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[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
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Diet, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54726
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1995 Nov;42(5):410-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
P. Marckmann
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1995 Nov;42(5):410-25
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Coagulation Factors - physiology
Controlled Clinical Trials
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Fibrinolysis - physiology
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - physiology
PubMed ID
8747799 View in PubMed
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[Diet for heart patients. A questionnaire study at Danish coronary care units]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54485
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Jul 28;159(31):4751-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-28-1997
Author
E T Jeppesen
P. Marckmann
Author Affiliation
Landbohejskole, Majeri, Frederiksberg.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Jul 28;159(31):4751-5
Date
Jul-28-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina, Unstable - diet therapy
Coronary Care Units
Coronary Disease - diet therapy
Denmark
Diabetic diet
Diet, Fat-Restricted
English Abstract
Food Service, Hospital
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diet therapy
Myocardial Ischemia - diet therapy
Patient Education
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
A questionnaire survey of Danish hospitals showed that 70% of patients admitted for acute ischaemic heart disease were served the ordinary menu during their stay at the hospital. About 10% had a diabetic menu, while 20% had different kinds of lipid lowering diets. The ordinary menu contained 17 energy percent (E%) protein, 38 E% fat, and 46 E% carbohydrate. The amount of fibre was 3.1 g/MJ, the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids (P/S) was 0.4, and the total energy in a day's menu was 8.1 MJ. The ordinary high-fat hospital diets differ markedly from diets believed to be cardioprotective, contrast with the dietary counselling given during admission, and should be replaced by lipid lowering diets in most cases of acute ischaemic heart disease for educational and therapeutic reasons.
PubMed ID
9265326 View in PubMed
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[Food intake of Danes and cardiac risk factors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54790
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Mar 20;157(12):1667-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1995
Author
P. Marckmann
B. Sandström
J. Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Forskningsinstitut for Human Ernaering, Den Kgl. Veterinaer- og Landbohøjskole, Frederiksberg.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Mar 20;157(12):1667-71
Date
Mar-20-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
We served a low-fat (28% of energy) high-fibre (3.3 g/MJ) diet according to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (REC diet), and a high-fat diet (39% of energy) corresponding to the average Danish diet (DANE diet) to 21 healthy middle-aged individuals in a two times two weeks cross-over study. The REC diet resulted in lower serum concentrations of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (medians: 2.77 vs 3.04 mmol/l, p
PubMed ID
7740627 View in PubMed
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Low-fat, high-fiber diet favorably affects several independent risk markers of ischemic heart disease: observations on blood lipids, coagulation, and fibrinolysis from a trial of middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54906
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Apr;59(4):935-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
P. Marckmann
B. Sandström
J. Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Apr;59(4):935-9
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Coagulation
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - metabolism
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Female
Fibrinolysis
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - diet therapy - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We served a low-fat (28% of energy), high-fiber (3.3 g/MJ) diet according to Nordic nutrition recommendations (Rec diet), and a high-fat diet (39% of energy) corresponding to the average Danish diet (Dane diet) for periods of 2 wk in a randomized crossover study of 21 healthy middle-aged individuals. The Rec diet resulted in lower serum concentrations of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (medians: 2.77 vs 3.04 mmol/L, P
PubMed ID
8147341 View in PubMed
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[Physician's role in misinformation about nutrition]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62154
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Jul 20;154(30):2095-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-1992

Replacing dairy fat with rapeseed oil causes rapid improvement of hyperlipidaemia: a randomized controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135556
Source
J Intern Med. 2011 Oct;270(4):356-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
D. Iggman
I-B Gustafsson
L. Berglund
B. Vessby
P. Marckmann
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. david.iggman@ltdalarna.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2011 Oct;270(4):356-64
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Over Studies
Dairy Products
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Double-Blind Method
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - diet therapy
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Plant Oils - administration & dosage
Sweden
Abstract
Rapeseed oil (RO), also known as canola oil, principally contains the unsaturated fatty acids 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3 and may promote cardiometabolic health.
To investigate the effects on lipoprotein profile, factors of coagulation and insulin sensitivity of replacing a diet rich in saturated fat from dairy foods (DF diet) with a diet including RO-based fat (RO diet).
During a 2?3-week randomized, controlled, cross-over trial, 20 free-living hyperlipidaemic subjects were provided with isocaloric test diets that differed in fat composition alone. Blood lipoprotein profile, coagulation and fibrinolytic factors and insulin sensitivity (euglycaemic clamp) were determined before and after the dietary intervention.
All subjects completed the study, and compliance was high according to changes in serum fatty acids. The RO diet, but not the DF diet, reduced the levels of serum cholesterol (-17%), triglycerides (-20%) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-17%), cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio (-21%), apolipoprotein (apo) B/apo A-I ratio (-4%) and factor VII coagulant activity (FVIIc) (-5%) from baseline. These changes were significantly different between the diets (P=0.05 to P
Notes
Comment In: J Intern Med. 2011 Oct;270(4):343-521682781
PubMed ID
21466598 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.