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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Acceptance, caries reduction and reported adverse effects of fluoride prophylaxis in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41686
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1978 May;6(3):110-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1978
Author
P. Lökken
J M Birkeland
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1978 May;6(3):110-6
Date
May-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dentifrices
Drug Evaluation
Female
Fluorides - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Tablets
Abstract
Water fluoridation has not been introduced in Norway, although 99% of the population receive water with suboptimal fluoride levels. Alternative methods of fluoride prophylaxis have gained wide acceptance in this country. While less than 1% of the children received fluoride tablet in 1971, sales data in 1976 indicated a daily supply of fluoride tablets to 50% of the 0-5-year-olds and to 20% of the 6-11-year-olds. Most schoolchildren have joined mass prophylactic programs with regular with regular applications of fluoride solutions. Furthermore, fluoride-containing dentifrices have become available and are increasingly used. The increased use of fluoride has been paralleled by a marked reduction in caries and restorative need. During the past 5 years, a reduction of about 45% in the number of fillings inserted in 6-17-year-old children has been noted. In some areas, a 70% reduction has been recorded. The ratio between expenses for prophylaxis and savings in cost of treatment is favorable. The Norwegian Adverse Drug Reaction Committe received 34 case reports of adverse effects ascribed to fluoride prophylaxis, from 1970 to 1977. None of the 25 follow-up studies performed, suggested fluoride to have been responsible for the reported symptoms. In Norway, the benefits of fluoride prophylaxis are becoming increasingly evident.
PubMed ID
278689 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adverse effects reported in caries-prophylactic use of fluoride in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41941
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1977 Jun 20;97(17-18):915-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1977

[Adverse effects reported in the caries prevention with fluorides in Norway during the 10 years between 1970 and 1979]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40877
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1980 Dec 10;100(34-36):2070-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1980

[Caries prevention--results and possibilities with the use of fluoride tablets]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43603
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1972 Jun;82(6):325-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1972

Discoloration of permanent front teeth in 3,157 Norwegian children due to tetracyclines and other factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41687
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1978 May;86(3):147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1978
Author
H. Ulvestad
P. Lökken
F. Mjörud
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1978 May;86(3):147-52
Date
May-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Dental Enamel Hypoplasia - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Tetracyclines - adverse effects
Tooth Discoloration - chemically induced - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
During routine orthodontic screening in Oslo, Norway, of 3,157 children, aged 1--11 years and born in 1963/64, 36 cases (1.14%) with cosmetically marring discoloration of permanent front teeth were registered. Thirty-four of them arrived for a more exhaustive examination, which in 24 of the children revealed positive tetracycline fluorescence on exposure to ultraviolet light. In 13 (0.4%) of the children, the discolorations were diagnosed to be tetracycline-induced. Enamel hypoplasia was frequently found in teeth with positive fluorescence. Multiple exposures to various tetracyclines were reported in all children who exhibited positive fluorescence.
PubMed ID
276912 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1981 Apr;91(6):204-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
P. Løkken
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1981 Apr;91(6):204-6
Date
Apr-1981
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
6940100 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Fluoride against caries. Should toothpaste be a substitute for tablets in basic prophylaxis for children?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34363
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Feb 20;117(5):642-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1997

[Fluorosis due to fluoride in drinking water. A health risk even in Norway?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37143
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 May 10;111(12):1506-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1991
Author
P. Løkken
J. Valderhaug
Author Affiliation
Det odontologiske fakultet Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 May 10;111(12):1506-7
Date
May-10-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Fluoridation - adverse effects
Fluorosis, Dental - etiology
Humans
Infant
Norway
Risk factors
Water supply
Abstract
About 99% of the Norwegian population are supplied with surface water with very low fluoride levels. Accordingly, they need to use fluoride preparations to prevent dental caries. Groundwater with excess fluoride is a problem mainly in a few areas of South-Eastern Norway, where in some samples of borehole water the fluoride concentration has even exceeded 10 ppm. A warning is given against the use of high-fluoride water when preparing drinks and foods for children. Infants given dried milk formulas diluted with water are at particular risk of developing fluorosis. The recommended daily meals for a three month-old child contain 900 ml water. At a level of 2 ppm, the fluoride content of this volume will exceed the upper limit of the safe and adequate intake for a child this age by 3-4 times. Water used for this purpose should preferably not contain more than 0.5 ppm fluoride. While only few Norwegians are at risk of being exposed to high-fluoride water this problem affects many persons in other parts of the world. With reference to a joint Kenyan-Norwegian research project, the paper is illustrated by cases of dental fluorosis from a Kenyan village supplied with 9 ppm fluoride water. Dental fluorosis of such severity has never been encountered in Norway.
PubMed ID
2042186 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Increase in fluoride prophylaxis--less caries in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41603
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1978 Aug 30;98(24):1155-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1978

16 records – page 1 of 2.