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37 records – page 1 of 4.

Abdominal sonographic findings at primary diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children: a comparison with different clinical risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23164
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1995 Jul-Aug;12(4):355-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
A E Ojala
F P Lanning
B M Lanning
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1995 Jul-Aug;12(4):355-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - pathology - ultrasonography
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Male
Prognosis
Risk factors
Abstract
We evaluated the presence of abdominal organomegaly and lymphadenopathy with ultrasound in 92 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) prior to chemotherapy, and compared these findings with the different immunophenotypes, age groups, and white blood cell (WBC) counts as well as the survival of the patients and the clinical findings of organomegaly. All the patients (n = 13) with a WBC higher than 50/microL showed intra-abdominal pathology compared with the patients with a low WBC, of whom 37% (n = 18) had normal scans. The children with a high WBC count also had hepatomegaly (P = 0.003) and splenomegaly (P = 0.06) significantly more often, and showed high echogenicity of the kidneys (P = 0.001). Lymphadenopathy was found significantly more often in children with T-cell leukemia (P = 0.005). The younger age groups (0 to 2 and 2 to 5 years of age) had hepatomegaly significantly more often (P = 0.02), and the youngest age group (0 to 2 years) showed increased echogenicity of the kidneys more often (P = 0.04). Ultrasound showed hepatomegaly in 14 patients and splenomegaly in 23 patients who were assessed clinically as normal. According to our results, abdominal ultrasound is a useful tool for evaluating abdominal organomegaly and the extramedullary leukemic burden and can give information that is not available in clinical examination. There was no statistical association between the primary ultrasonographic findings and the patients' later survival.
PubMed ID
7577387 View in PubMed
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[Abdominal trauma in a child leading to intramural hematoma of the duodenum]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34412
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(13):1257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
S. Anttila
P. Lanning
Author Affiliation
Radiologian klinikka, Oulu.
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(13):1257-62
Date
1997
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - complications - diagnosis - radiography
Adolescent
Child
Duodenum - injuries - radiography
Hematoma - etiology - radiography
Humans
PubMed ID
10622130 View in PubMed
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Abdominal ultrasound findings during and after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21944
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1997 Oct;29(4):266-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
A E Ojala
F P Lanning
B M Lanning
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1997 Oct;29(4):266-71
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - ultrasonography
Adolescent
Cecal Diseases - chemically induced - etiology - ultrasonography
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - chemically induced - etiology - ultrasonography
Humans
Infant
Inflammation
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1 - complications - therapy - ultrasonography
Male
Pancreatitis - chemically induced - etiology - ultrasonography
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The treatment of acute leukemia in childhood has been increasingly successful. Concurrently, severe leukemia-related gastrointestinal complications have become more common. METHODS: We evaluated the findings of the abdominal ultrasound (US) examinations of 52 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had severe clinical symptoms indicating infection or abdominal complication during chemotherapy treatment or after the cessation of such treatment and assessed the impact of these findings on patients' subsequent treatment and survival. RESULTS: Our study presents ten cases of typhlitis with a prevalence of 9%, all of which were rapidly diagnosed by US and had a favourable outcome. We also found focal intra-abdominal parenchymal lesions in six children, five of them due to fungal infection and one due to leukemic infiltration. Several other intra-abdominal pathologies significant for the patients' treatment are also reported. DISCUSSION: We believe that abdominal US is a useful, rapid, safe, and accurate imaging method for children with ALL suspected to suffer from leukemia- or chemotherapy-related gastrointestinal complications. More invasive imaging methods are seldom needed. CONCLUSIONS: According to our results, abdominal US gives the necessary information in most of the cases and provides prompt diagnosis, which may prevent possible fatal complications.
PubMed ID
9251732 View in PubMed
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Activity-based costing in radiology. Application in a pediatric radiological unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32870
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Laurila
I. Suramo
M. Brommels
E M Tolppanen
P. Koivukangas
P. Lanning
G. Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Rationing - economics
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pediatrics - economics
Radiology Department, Hospital - economics
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: To get an informative and detailed picture of the resource utilization in a radiology department in order to support its pricing and management. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A system based mainly on the theoretical foundations of activity-based costing (ABC) was designed, tested and compared with conventional costing. The study was performed at the Pediatric Unit of the Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital. The material consisted of all the 7,452 radiological procedures done in the unit during the first half of 1994, when both methods of costing where in use. Detailed cost data were obtained from the hospital financial and personnel systems and then related to activity data captured in the radiology information system. RESULTS: The allocation of overhead costs was greatly reduced by the introduction of ABC compared to conventional costing. The overhead cost as a percentage of total costs dropped to one-fourth of total costs, from 57% to 16%. The change of unit costs of radiological procedures varied from -42% to +82%. CONCLUSION: Costing is much more detailed and precise, and the percentage of unspecified allocated overhead costs diminishes drastically when ABC is used. The new information enhances effective departmental management, as the whole process of radiological procedures is identifiable by single activities, amenable to corrective actions and process improvement.
PubMed ID
10741796 View in PubMed
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Axial radiography or CT in the measurement of patellofemoral malalignment indices in children and adolescents?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34672
Source
Clin Radiol. 1996 Sep;51(9):639-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
V. Vähäsarja
P. Lanning
Lähde
W. Serlo
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Surgery University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Clin Radiol. 1996 Sep;51(9):639-43
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Femur - radiography
Humans
Knee Joint - abnormalities - radiography
Male
Muscle Contraction
Patella - radiography
Reproducibility of Results
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The present study compares the repeatability of patellofemoral malalignment (PFM) indices obtained by 20 degree flexion axial radiography (AR) and computerized tomography (CT) with 0 degree and 20 degree flexion of the knees in children and adolescents. Thirty-one patients with a mean age of 14.2 years (range 8 to 19.2 years) suffering from PFM were examined using these two radiographic techniques. The lateral patellofemoral angle (LPA), the lateral patellar tilt (LPT), and the lateral patellar displacement (LPD) were measured by by two different investigators on different occasions, and the agreement of these indices between CT and AR was evaluated according to Bland and Altman's statistical method. LPT and LPD obtained by AR were more reliable and repeatable than those obtained by CT. The quadriceps muscle contraction exacerbates PFM indices significantly with the knees in full extension (P = 0.0001). LPT and LPD measured at 20 degrees AR show reliably the two pathological components (the patellar tilt and the lateral patellar displacement) of PFM which are necessary for diagnosis and treatment planning. CT with quadriceps contractions is better in qualitative screening of more subtle cases of PFM.
PubMed ID
8810694 View in PubMed
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Bone marrow changes on MRI in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia 5 years after treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21742
Source
Clin Radiol. 1998 Feb;53(2):131-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
A E Ojala
E. Pääkkö
F P Lanning
A H Harila-Saari
B M Lanning
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Clin Radiol. 1998 Feb;53(2):131-6
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bone Marrow - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - drug therapy - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Osteonecrosis - chemically induced - diagnosis
Risk factors
Abstract
T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lower extremities was performed 5 years after the cessation of therapy on 25 children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Signal intensity pathologies considered to be related with the leukaemia itself or the treatment of ALL were found in nine of 25 children (36%). Two of these children had findings of osteonecrosis, five had a patchy signal pattern, one had diffuse inhomogeneity of the bone marrow signal intensity in complete remission and one had diffusely decreased signal intensity preceding the diagnosis of relapse. MRI unexpectedly revealed many bone marrow pathologies in symptomless children successfully treated for ALL. Especially, osteonecrosis might cause significant disability, and the aetiology, clinical course and prognosis of this complication are not well known. The intensive dexamethasone medication included in the treatment protocols may be responsible for the development of osteonecrosis. However, the prognosis of osteonecrosis in the long run requires further studies.
PubMed ID
9502090 View in PubMed
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Brain single photon emission computed tomography at term age for predicting cerebral palsy after preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58685
Source
Biol Neonate. 2001 Jan;79(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
A M Valkama
A. Ahonen
L. Vainionpää
P. Torniainen
P. Lanning
M. Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland. marita.valkama@oulu.fi
Source
Biol Neonate. 2001 Jan;79(1):27-33
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Birth weight
Brain - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Cerebral Palsy - radionuclide imaging - ultrasonography
Echoencephalography
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
In order to assess the predictive value of neonatal brain perfusion with single photon emission computed tomography (SPET) with regard to neuromotor outcome at a corrected age of 18 months, 34 infants with birth weight
PubMed ID
11150827 View in PubMed
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Central airways stenosis in school-aged children: differential diagnosis from asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15364
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(4):399-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
O. Linna
K. Hyrynkangas
P. Lanning
P. Nieminen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(4):399-402
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - diagnosis
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Infant
Laryngostenosis - diagnosis - physiopathology
Larynx - pathology
Male
Respiratory Mechanics
Spirometry
Tracheal Stenosis - diagnosis - physiopathology
Abstract
This study assessed the value of spirometry and chest X-rays in the diagnosis of airways stenosis in the tracheal or laryngeal regions at school age. A series of 14 patients was studied. Six of them had vascular ring anomalies, four subglottic stenosis, two aberrant innominate artery, one tracheal stenosis and one a laryngeal web. Four patients were suffering from chronic cough and ten from dyspnoea, noisy breathing and cough upon physical exercise. Two had had their symptoms since infancy and five since 3-6 y of age, whereas seven had had their first symptoms at school age. Nine patients had previously been suspected of having asthma, and five of them had been using inhaled corticosteroids, one inhaled sodium cromoglycate and one peroral terbutaline without any effect. The ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) to peak expiratory flow (PEF) was abnormally high in most of the patients. All six children with vascular ring anomalies also had an abnormal aortic configuration on a chest X-ray, and narrowing of the trachea was seen in two of the four with subglottic stenosis. Two children had both chest X-rays and spirometry values within the normal limits. Conclusion: The results show that children with stenosis in the laryngeal or tracheal region may not have their first symptoms until school age. Many patients are falsely suspected of having asthma. Simple spirometry and chest X-rays will help the physician to make the correct diagnosis in these patients.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2003;92(2):266; author reply 26712710661
PubMed ID
12061354 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics and factors affecting growth in long-term survivors of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22749
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Mar;26(3):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
K K Talvensaari
M. Knip
P. Lanning
M. Lanning
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Mar;26(3):166-72
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
6-Mercaptopurine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adult
Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Cranial Irradiation - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Growth - drug effects - radiation effects
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Neoplasms - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survivors
Abstract
We evaluated clinical characteristics and growth in 51 (24 males) long-term survivors of childhood cancer (median follow up 12.7 years). Patients were shorter, had a higher proportion of body fat and higher systolic blood pressure than their controls. The change in relative height during treatment was -0.83 standard deviation score (S.D.S.) in patients with cranial irradiation and -0.32 S.D.S. in patients without cranial irradiation; the figures after treatment were -0.56 and 0.20 S.D.S., respectively. Half (r2 = 0.50) of the variation in growth retardation during therapy could be explained by the cumulative doses of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and vincristine and relative height at diagnosis. Cranial irradiation, increased relative height at diagnosis and young age at diagnosis were significant predictors of growth failure over the total observation period, explaining 43% of the variation. We conclude that long-term survivors of childhood cancer have impaired linear growth, increased body fat mass and elevated systolic blood pressure. Young children who are tall for their age at diagnosis and treated with cranial irradiation have the highest risk of impaired growth after the diagnosis. High doses of 6-MP seem to contribute significantly to growth retardation during therapy.
PubMed ID
8544798 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.