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24 records – page 1 of 3.

Acute mastoiditis in Greenland between 1994-2007

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284494
Source
Page 112 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
P. Homoe
R.G. Jensen
S. Brofeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Dronning Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Page 112 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 2. Infectious Diseases and Sexual Health.
Documents
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Acute otitis media and age at onset among children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33376
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1999 Jan;119(1):65-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1999 Jan;119(1):65-71
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Prevalence
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
This survey examines the age at onset of acute otitis media (AOM) in 591 unselected Greenlandic children aged 3, 4, 5 and 8 years from the two largest towns in Greenland. The attendance rate was 86%. Parental information about episodes of AOM was cross-checked in medical records, which were available for 95% of the children. AOM was defined as episodes with earache, otorrhoea or previous treatment for AOM, with written otoscopic evidence of AOM resulting in treatment with weak analgetics or antibiotics. Recurrent AOM (rAOM) was defined as > or = 5 AOM episodes since birth. In total, 66% of the children had experienced AOM at least once. Of all children, 40% had AOM during the first year of life. Median age of the first episode was 10 months (range: 1-84 months), and there was no sex difference. Children between 7 and 12 months of age were at highest risk of AOM. Children with rAOM had their first AOM episode at a significantly younger age than children with
PubMed ID
10219388 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media and sociomedical risk factors among unselected children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3493
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Date
Jun-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the sociomedical risk factors associated with episodes of acute otitis media (AOM), recurrent AOM (rAOM), and chronic otitis media (COM) in Greenlandic children and especially to point out children at high risk of rAOM (defined as > 5 AOM episodes since birth) and COM which are prevalent among Inuit children all over the Arctic. METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and included 740 unselected children, 3, 4, 5, and 8-years-old, living in two major Greenlandic towns, Nuuk and Sisimiut. All children were otologically examined and the parents answered a questionnaire containing sociomedical variables including ethnicity, family history of OM, housing, insulation, crowding, daycare, passive cigarette smoking, breast feeding, type of diet, allergy, and chronic diseases. Historical data were cross-checked in medical records which also formed the basis for the drop-out analyses. Statistical analyses included frequency tests, calculation of odds ratio (OR), and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The attendance rate was 86%. Former episode of AOM was reported by 2/3 of the children, rAOM by 20%, and COM by 9%. The following variables were found significantly more often in children with AOM by simple frequency testing: Parental (OR = 1.83), sibling (OR = 1.62), and parental plus sibling (OR = 2.56) history of OM, crowding (OR = 5.55), long period of exclusive breast feeding ( > 4 months) (OR = 2.47), and recent acute disease (P = 0.034). The following variables were found significantly more often in children with rAOM or COM by simple frequency testing: Parental history of OM (OR = 1.60; OR = 2.11, respectively) and no recall of breast feeding (P = 0.005; P = 0.003, respectively). Also, COM was found significantly more often in children with two Greenlandic parents (OR = 3.07). A multiple logistic regression test denoted only parental history of OM (OR = 1.82) and long period of exclusive breast feeding (OR = 1.14) as significant predictors of AOM. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the risk factors usually associated with AOM could not be confirmed as risk factors in this survey. Parental history of OM and long period of exclusive breast feeding were the strongest factors associated with AOM in Greenlandic children and ethnicity was associated with COM. However, the study confirms that AOM is a multifactorial disease determined by a number of genetic and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
10428404 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory tract infections and mannose-binding lectin insufficiency during early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6751
Source
JAMA. 2001 Mar 14;285(10):1316-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2001
Author
A. Koch
M. Melbye
P. Sørensen
P. Homøe
H O Madsen
K. Mølbak
C H Hansen
L H Andersen
G W Hahn
P. Garred
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. ako@ssi.dk
Source
JAMA. 2001 Mar 14;285(10):1316-21
Date
Mar-14-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Carrier Proteins - blood - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Genotype
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Inuits - genetics
Male
Mannose-Binding Lectins
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - blood - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
CONTEXT: Hospital-based studies have found that increased susceptibility to certain infections is associated with low serum levels of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) due to MBL variant alleles. However, the contribution of MBL insufficiency to incidence of common childhood infections at a population level is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of MBL insufficiency on risk for acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) in unselected children younger than 2 years. DESIGN AND SETTING: Population-based, prospective, cohort study conducted in Sisimiut, Greenland. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred fifty-two children younger than 2 years who were followed up weekly between August 1996 and August 1998 for morbidity surveillance. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Risk of ARI, based on medical history and clinical examination, compared by MBL genotype, determined from blood samples based on presence of structural and promoter alleles. RESULTS: A 2.08-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-3.06) increased relative risk (RR) of ARI was found in MBL-insufficient children (n = 13) compared with MBL-sufficient children (n = 239; P
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2001 Mar 14;285(10):1348-911255392
PubMed ID
11255386 View in PubMed
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Associations between otitis media and child behavioural and learning difficulties: Results from a Danish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278235
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 May;84:12-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
J. Niclasen
C. Obel
P. Homøe
A. Kørvel-Hanquist
J. Dammeyer
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 May;84:12-20
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Learning Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Male
Otitis Media - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Findings from studies investigating early childhood episodes of otitis media (OM) and developmental outcomes are inconclusive. This may in part be because large-scale prospective studies controlling for relevant confounding factors are sparse. The present study investigates associations between OM in early childhood and later behavioural and learning difficulties controlling for relevant confounding factors.
The study applied data from the Aarhus Birth Cohort's 10-12-year-old follow-up (N=7578). Associations between retrospective parent-reported OM (no OM; 1-3 episodes of OM with/without tympanostomy tubes; 4+ OM episodes without tympanostomy tubes and; 4+ OM episodes with tympanostomy tubes) one the one hand, and parent- and teacher-reported scores on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and parent-reported academic difficulties on the other hand, were investigated. The following variables were controlled for: parental educational level, maternal and paternal school problems, parental post-natal smoking, breastfeeding, and age at which the child started walking. All analyses were stratified by gender.
Large differences in background characteristics were observed for the group of children with 4+ OM episodes with tympanostomy tubes compared to the no OM group. After controlling for relevant confounders, negative associations were consistently observed for the group of children with 4+ episodes of OM with tympanostomy tubes compared to the group of children without OM. This was particularly so for girls.
The findings suggest an association between 4+ episodes of early OM with tympanostomy tubes and behavioural and learning difficulties later in childhood. The large inter-group differences, i.e. impact of residual and unmeasured confounding factors, may in part explain the observed associations and underline the need to include these in future studies.
PubMed ID
27063746 View in PubMed
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Cholesteatomas in Greenlandic Inuit. A retrospective study and follow-up of treated cases from 1976-91.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6338
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994 Apr;53(2):86-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
P. Homøe
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994 Apr;53(2):86-90
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Cholesteatoma - epidemiology - ethnology
Ear Diseases - ethnology
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Chronic otitis media is frequent among the Inuit in Greenland, but reports of cholesteatomas are rare. To describe cholesteatoma in Greenland, we have performed a retrospective study and follow-up of Greenlandic Inuit treated at the ENT-department, Rigshospitalet, Denmark in the period 1976-91. We found 35 Greenlandic Inuit with cholesteatoma, the first in 1976. Median age was 19 years. The total incidence was calculated to 5 per 100.000 per year, or 2 new cases per year. The geographical distribution showed less cholesteatomas among the people with a traditional way of life in the Hunter region. The complication rate was 11%. The extension and pathology of the cholesteatomas indicated late and infrequent contact with an ENT specialist. The follow-up study revealed 53% dry ears with intact tympanic membrane, and 47% with intermittent ear discharge. Residual or recurrent cholesteatoma was found in 46% of the patients, less frequently when the primary operation included mastoidectomy with canal wall-down technique. We recommend this operation in most Greenlandic Inuit with cholesteatomas.
PubMed ID
8018220 View in PubMed
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CT-scanning of ancient Greenlandic Inuit temporal bones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6341
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1992;112(4):674-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
P. Homøe
N. Lynnerup
H. Videbaek
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1992;112(4):674-9
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air
Greenland - ethnology
History, Ancient
Humans
Inuits - history
Mastoid - pathology - radiography
Otitis Media - history - pathology - radiography
Paleopathology
Temporal Bone - pathology - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Additional morphological evidence of former infectious middle ear disease (IMED) was found by CT-scanning in 5 of 6 Greenlandic Inuit crania strongly suspected for former IMED due to earlier examination revealing either bilateral hypocellularity or asymmetry of the pneumatized area of the temporal bones. The CT-scans showed sclerosing and obliteration of the air cells and even destruction of the cellular septae, and a high degree of irregularity of the cells. Sclerosing of the surrounding bone tissue was also found. The findings in one cranium were dubious and could both be regarded as a congenital malformation or an infection in infanthood. CT-scan confirms and even adds to the results of conventional X-ray of temporal bones making hypotheses of paleopathology more reliable. The findings also support the environmental theory of pneumatization of the air cell system in the temporal bones.
PubMed ID
1442014 View in PubMed
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Danish guidelines on management of otitis media in preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281368
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Aug;87:154-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
C H Heidemann
J. Lous
J. Berg
J J Christensen
S J Håkonsen
M. Jakobsen
C J Johansen
L H Nielsen
M P Hansen
A. Poulsen
L P Schousboe
C. Skrubeltang
A B Vind
P. Homøe
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Aug;87:154-63
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Acute Disease
Adenoidectomy
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Disease Management
Humans
Infant
Middle Ear Ventilation
Otitis Media - diagnosis - therapy
Otitis Media with Effusion - diagnosis - therapy
Otoscopy
Recurrence
Risk
Watchful Waiting
Abstract
Otitis media is one of the most common diseases in small children. This underlines the importance of optimizing diagnostics and treatment of the condition. Recent literature points toward a stricter approach to diagnosing acute otitis media (AOM). Moreover, ventilating tube treatment for recurrent AOM (RAOM) and chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) has become the most frequently performed surgical procedure in pre-school children. Therefore, the Danish Health and Medicines Authority and the Danish Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery deemed it necessary to update the Danish guidelines regarding the diagnostic criteria for acute otitis media and surgical treatment of RAOM and COME.
The GRADE system (The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) was used in order to comply with current standards of evidence assessment in formulation of recommendations. An extensive literature search was conducted between July and December 2014. The quality of the existing literature was assessed using AGREE II (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation), AMSTAR (assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews), QUADAS-2 (Quality of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies), Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool for randomized trials and ACROBAT-NRSI (A Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Non-Randomized Studies). The working group consisted of otolaryngologists, general practitioners, pediatricians, microbiologists and epidemiologists.
Recommendations for AOM diagnosis, surgical management for RAOM and COME, including the role of adenoidectomy and treatment of ventilating tube otorrhea, are proposed in the guideline.
PubMed ID
27368465 View in PubMed
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[Diseases in children in Greenland: middle ear infections in particular]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33742
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Aug 3;160(32):4659-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-3-1998
Author
P. Homøe
C. Brahe-Pedersen
P. Bretlau
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Aug 3;160(32):4659-60
Date
Aug-3-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 May 4;160(19):2856-629599562
PubMed ID
9719752 View in PubMed
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Estimation of otitis media in ancient populations. A study of past and present Greenlandic Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6336
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 1996 Dec;110(12):1114-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
P. Homøe
N. Lynnerup
L T Skovgaard
N. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 1996 Dec;110(12):1114-9
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropology, Physical
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Temporal Bone - pathology
Abstract
Examination of disease patterns in the past has often been difficult due to lack of morphological evidence. This study presents a new unbiased method for estimation of occurrence of infectious middle ear disease (IMED) in childhood. The method is based on the relation between IMED in childhood and small or asymmetric pneumatized cell areas in the temporal bones as seen on standardised X-rays. A polychotomous logistic regression model was applied on 434 pneumatized cell areas in temporal bones from 34 adult living Greenlandic Inuit, 56 adult crania from the 18th to the 19th century, A.D. and 127 adult Inuit crania from the pre-European colonization period (before A.D. 1721) of Greenland. The occurrence of IMED as designated by the model was eight out of 34 (23.5 per cent) in living Inuit, 10 out of 56 (17.9 per cent) in crania from the 18th to 19th century and six out of 127 (4.7 per cent) in crania from the pre-colonization period. These frequencies differed significantly (p
PubMed ID
9015422 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.