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Cardiovascular mortality as it relates to the geographic distribution of employment in non-metropolitan Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237826
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1986;22(5):559-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
P. Foggin
D. Godon
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1986;22(5):559-69
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Agriculture
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Quebec
Risk
Sex Factors
Abstract
This exploratory analysis examines relationships between employment-specific cardiovascular mortality and certain spatially-based potential risk factors. Standard mortality ratios (SMRs) are mapped on the basis of non-metropolitan primary and secondary employment basins of Quebec. In order to control for geographical anomalies, the data are broken down into three spatial grids: employment basins with the employment poles, employment basins without the employment poles and the employment poles (municipalities) taken alone. This cartography suggests a certain number of cardiovascular disease-prone employment areas in Quebec. Linkage analysis and principal components analysis are used to simplify and clarify the complex relationships that exist among selected independent variables (potential risk factors) and multiple regression analysis is used to identify the functional relationships between these employment, geographic and demographic variables and the study's dependent variable (ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular mortality) in the form of standard mortality ratios (SMRs). Cardiovascular mortality (SMRs) are found to be related negatively to an employment age-factor and, in the case of women, negatively to agricultural employment, marginally and positively to pulp and paper employment. It would appear that outside the very large cities in areas of primary and industrial employment, men are at greater risk of cardiovascular mortality during their working lives than those who are over the age of 65. Although it was not possible to establish strong positive links between most employment sectors and cardiovascular mortality, it is possible to conclude that there is a negative association for men between textile employment and cerebrovascular mortality; that in the case of women, those who work in agriculture are less at risk than women who are working in industrial employment. There is also some statistical evidence that there is an association between women in the pulp and paper industry and cardiovascular risk levels. This research provides some clues as to the need to investigate certain areas of employment that may be creating unnecessary risks to health, especially in the case of female workers.
PubMed ID
3486477 View in PubMed
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The other face of development: native population, health status and indicators of malnutrition--the case of the Cree and Inuit of northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3251
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1989;29(8):965-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
J P Thouez
A. Rannou
P. Foggin
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1989;29(8):965-74
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The cultural setting of the isolated Cree Indian and Inuit communities is described and measures of their health examined. Questionnaires were employed to consider both epidemiological and socio-cultural facets and physical examination evaluated serological indicators of nutritional status. Changes of lifestyle toward store purchased food and a lessened reliance on hunting and fishing along with the non-native nature of the health services available seem to be leading to heart conditions, hypertension and diabetes all of which give cause for concern.
PubMed ID
2814583 View in PubMed
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[Services 60 the sick: yesterday and today].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241086
Source
Infirm Can. 1984 Jan;26(1):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1984

[Socioecological determinants of the risk of accidents in young pedestrians].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227618
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1991;39(4):345-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M F Joly
P. Foggin
I. Pless
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1991;39(4):345-51
Date
1991
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Ecology
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk
Seasons
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
We studied all traffic accidents to pedestrians under age 15 which occurred on the Island of Montreal during an eighteen months period. Data were collected from eleven hospitals and completed with accident police records. A spatial quadrat analysis, a Comparative Accident Index, and a comparative analysis of the means of different socio-ecological variables between high and low risk accident areas revealed interesting patterns. The location of traffic accidents is not random but rather presents a particular spatial structure. High risk zones are characterized by dense population, fast-moving traffic, and the absence of parks. Accidents often take place on two-way streets, far from traffic lights, on dry surfaces, in good weather, and with good visibility. The socio-economic status of the victim's family as measured by education, income, and unemployment, tends to be low. More boys than girls are victims. Children are often injured while getting out of a car or crossing unconventionally.
PubMed ID
1754700 View in PubMed
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