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Acute otitis media and age at onset among children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33376
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1999 Jan;119(1):65-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1999 Jan;119(1):65-71
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Prevalence
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
This survey examines the age at onset of acute otitis media (AOM) in 591 unselected Greenlandic children aged 3, 4, 5 and 8 years from the two largest towns in Greenland. The attendance rate was 86%. Parental information about episodes of AOM was cross-checked in medical records, which were available for 95% of the children. AOM was defined as episodes with earache, otorrhoea or previous treatment for AOM, with written otoscopic evidence of AOM resulting in treatment with weak analgetics or antibiotics. Recurrent AOM (rAOM) was defined as > or = 5 AOM episodes since birth. In total, 66% of the children had experienced AOM at least once. Of all children, 40% had AOM during the first year of life. Median age of the first episode was 10 months (range: 1-84 months), and there was no sex difference. Children between 7 and 12 months of age were at highest risk of AOM. Children with rAOM had their first AOM episode at a significantly younger age than children with
PubMed ID
10219388 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media and sociomedical risk factors among unselected children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3493
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Date
Jun-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the sociomedical risk factors associated with episodes of acute otitis media (AOM), recurrent AOM (rAOM), and chronic otitis media (COM) in Greenlandic children and especially to point out children at high risk of rAOM (defined as > 5 AOM episodes since birth) and COM which are prevalent among Inuit children all over the Arctic. METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and included 740 unselected children, 3, 4, 5, and 8-years-old, living in two major Greenlandic towns, Nuuk and Sisimiut. All children were otologically examined and the parents answered a questionnaire containing sociomedical variables including ethnicity, family history of OM, housing, insulation, crowding, daycare, passive cigarette smoking, breast feeding, type of diet, allergy, and chronic diseases. Historical data were cross-checked in medical records which also formed the basis for the drop-out analyses. Statistical analyses included frequency tests, calculation of odds ratio (OR), and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The attendance rate was 86%. Former episode of AOM was reported by 2/3 of the children, rAOM by 20%, and COM by 9%. The following variables were found significantly more often in children with AOM by simple frequency testing: Parental (OR = 1.83), sibling (OR = 1.62), and parental plus sibling (OR = 2.56) history of OM, crowding (OR = 5.55), long period of exclusive breast feeding ( > 4 months) (OR = 2.47), and recent acute disease (P = 0.034). The following variables were found significantly more often in children with rAOM or COM by simple frequency testing: Parental history of OM (OR = 1.60; OR = 2.11, respectively) and no recall of breast feeding (P = 0.005; P = 0.003, respectively). Also, COM was found significantly more often in children with two Greenlandic parents (OR = 3.07). A multiple logistic regression test denoted only parental history of OM (OR = 1.82) and long period of exclusive breast feeding (OR = 1.14) as significant predictors of AOM. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the risk factors usually associated with AOM could not be confirmed as risk factors in this survey. Parental history of OM and long period of exclusive breast feeding were the strongest factors associated with AOM in Greenlandic children and ethnicity was associated with COM. However, the study confirms that AOM is a multifactorial disease determined by a number of genetic and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
10428404 View in PubMed
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Cholesteatomas in Greenlandic Inuit. A retrospective study and follow-up of treated cases from 1976-91.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6338
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994 Apr;53(2):86-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
P. Homøe
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994 Apr;53(2):86-90
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Cholesteatoma - epidemiology - ethnology
Ear Diseases - ethnology
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Chronic otitis media is frequent among the Inuit in Greenland, but reports of cholesteatomas are rare. To describe cholesteatoma in Greenland, we have performed a retrospective study and follow-up of Greenlandic Inuit treated at the ENT-department, Rigshospitalet, Denmark in the period 1976-91. We found 35 Greenlandic Inuit with cholesteatoma, the first in 1976. Median age was 19 years. The total incidence was calculated to 5 per 100.000 per year, or 2 new cases per year. The geographical distribution showed less cholesteatomas among the people with a traditional way of life in the Hunter region. The complication rate was 11%. The extension and pathology of the cholesteatomas indicated late and infrequent contact with an ENT specialist. The follow-up study revealed 53% dry ears with intact tympanic membrane, and 47% with intermittent ear discharge. Residual or recurrent cholesteatoma was found in 46% of the patients, less frequently when the primary operation included mastoidectomy with canal wall-down technique. We recommend this operation in most Greenlandic Inuit with cholesteatomas.
PubMed ID
8018220 View in PubMed
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[Diseases in children in Greenland: middle ear infections in particular]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33742
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Aug 3;160(32):4659-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-3-1998
Author
P. Homøe
C. Brahe-Pedersen
P. Bretlau
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Aug 3;160(32):4659-60
Date
Aug-3-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 May 4;160(19):2856-629599562
PubMed ID
9719752 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of nasopharyngeal and salivary gland carcinoma in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4123
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992 Oct;51(4):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
H. Albeck
N H Nielsen
H E Hansen
J. Bentzen
H H Ockelmann
P. Bretlau
H S Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992 Oct;51(4):189-95
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies - analysis
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
HLA Antigens - analysis
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Retrospective Studies
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Abstract
From 1950 to 1989 one hundred and forty-four cases of either undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) or salivary gland carcinoma (SGC) were diagnosed in Greenlanders, all born in Greenland. The Greenland SGC is an anaplastic carcinoma with histopathology and electronmicroscopic cytopathological alterations as found in undifferentiated NPC. Both NPC and SGC from Greenland and Alaska are associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection. The incidence rate of NPC based on newly diagnosed cases during the last 15 years is 12.7 for men and 9.2 for women. The same figures for anaplastic SGC are 3.4 and 3.1. These are among the highest incidence rates of Epstein-Barr virus associated carcinomas on record. From 1950 to 1989 there has been an increase in the rate of NPC. From the cumulated rate, it can be predicted that the number of cases will continue to increase during the years to come. During the ten year period 1980 to 1989 patients were questioned about their childhood life style and the family history was taken. The Inuit lifestyle is quite different from that of Europeans and Chinese, but in common with Chinese from Guangzhou (formerly Canton) Greenlanders have a high consumption of fish, fresh as well as dried. Familial clustering has been rarely reported, but in the present investigation 27% of the patients diagnosed between 1980 and 1990 had a positive familial history with one or more confirmed cases among first degree relatives.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1334414 View in PubMed
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Experience in qualitative and quantitative FDG PET in follow-up of patients with suspected recurrence from head and neck cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20485
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2000 May;36(7):858-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. Lapela
A. Eigtved
S. Jyrkkiö
R. Grénman
T. Kurki
P. Lindholm
J. Nuutinen
E. Sutinen
O. Solin
I. Bjornskov
P. Bretlau
L. Friberg
S. Holm
M. Jensen
H. Sand Hansen
H. Minn
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku, University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland. maria.lapela@leiras.fi
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2000 May;36(7):858-67
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Finland
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use - pharmacokinetics
Follow-Up Studies
Head and Neck Neoplasms - radiography - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Prognosis
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use - pharmacokinetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Tomography, Emission-Computed - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
We evaluated positron emission tomography (PET) with 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in the detection of recurrent head and neck cancer, and compared visual and quantitative interpretation of PET images for their accuracy in the identification of tumour recurrence. Sixty-two FDG PET studies were performed in 56 patients having a total of 81 lesions, which were clinically suspected for recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck. The PET images were interpreted visually, and tracer uptake was quantitated as the standardised uptake value adjusted to body weight (SUV). Sensitivity of visual interpretation of the PET images for the presence of malignancy ranged from 84 to 95%, and specificity from 84 to 93%, respectively, depending on the selected scheme for grading of the lesions. Malignant lesions accumulated significantly more FDG than the benign ones (the median SUVs were 6.8 and 3.3, respectively, P
PubMed ID
10785590 View in PubMed
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Familial clusters of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and salivary gland carcinomas in Greenland natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4118
Source
Cancer. 1993 Jul 1;72(1):196-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1993
Author
H. Albeck
J. Bentzen
H H Ockelmann
N H Nielsen
P. Bretlau
H S Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Cancer. 1993 Jul 1;72(1):196-200
Date
Jul-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Family
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Pedigree
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and anaplastic salivary gland carcinoma (SGC), both associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are common among Inuit from Greenland, Canada, and Alaska. Because immigrant studies have shown that factors acting early in life are important for the development of NPC, the authors interviewed new patients in Greenland with either NPC or SGC about their lifestyles during childhood and additional cases in their families. METHODS. On admission, new patients from Greenland with either NPC or SGC were interviewed about childhood life-style, family size, and other cases of NPC or SGC within the family. Additional cases were confirmed by review of the medical records concerning these patients. RESULTS. During the 11 years from 1980 through 1990, 17 of 63 (27%) cases in Greenland were found in familial clusters among first-degree relatives. There were no differences in the life-styles of multiple-case families and single-case families. CONCLUSIONS. The high rate of familial clusters among natives of Greenland is of interest because EBV is believed to play a role in the origin of these two diseases similar to that of Marek disease in neurolymphomatosis of chickens. Therefore, the familial clustering of NPC and SGC may indicate that an enhanced oncogenic potential of an EBV strain may occur more frequently in Greenland than in other parts of the world.
PubMed ID
8508406 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of otitis media in a survey of 591 unselected Greenlandic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34696
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1996 Aug;36(3):215-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1996 Aug;36(3):215-30
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Otitis Media - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
In an unselected survey in two Greenlandic towns, 591 children were examined to study the prevalence of otitis media (OM). The attendance rate in Nuuk was 80%, while 93% participated in Sisimiut. The children were three-, four-, five- and eight-years-old and represented 18% of children in these age groups in all Greenland. In total, 51.7% in Nuuk and 54.1% in Sisimiut presented pathologic middle ear affections ranging from slight to severe. The prevalence rates of chronic OM (COM) were 6.8% in Nuuk and 11.7% in Sisimiut (P = 0.055) but without significant age or sex difference. The acute OM point prevalence rate was between 1.5% and 0.4%. The prevalence rate of middle ear effusion (MEE) was between 23.0% and 28.2%. Secretory OM was significantly more prevalent in the younger age groups. The odds ratio of having COM was significantly higher in children with two Greenlandic born parents (3.07) than in children with only one Greenlandic born parent. A follow-up study after one year in Sisimiut revealed unchanged or aggravated middle ear disease in 56.8% of 82 children with middle ear pathology at the primary survey. Thus, OM persists as a major health problem among Greenlandic children, although the general socio-economic and medical conditions have improved during the last decades. Proposals are provided for increased otologic efforts.
PubMed ID
8864805 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.