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Epidemiology of long-term functional psychosis in three different areas in Stockholm County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73858
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1989 Jul;80(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989
Author
B. Widerlöv
P. Borgå
J. Cullberg
C G Stefansson
G. Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Nacka-Värmodö psychiatric Sector, Saltsjö-Boo, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1989 Jul;80(1):40-6
Date
Jul-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Suburban Population
Sweden
Urban health
Abstract
This study is the first in a series investigating different aspects of living conditions and care utilization in a total population with long-term functional psychoses (LFP). The study cohort (n = 302) was defined as people that: were aged 18-64 years, were affected by a nonorganic psychosis continuously during at least 6 months, showed psychotic features or residual symptoms during 1984, and had their home address in the study area during 1984. The study area consists of one rural and one suburban municipality, and one urban parish (57,035 inhabitants aged 18-64 years). The LFP concept used shows a high interrater reliability (kappa = 0.93). The one-year prevalence in the rural, suburban and urban areas was 3.4, 5.6 and 6.6 per 1000 respectively, thus producing a gradient from the rural to the urban areas. The prevalence of schizophrenia (DSM-III) was 2.6, 3.8 and 5.0 per 1000 respectively. The other diagnoses covered by the LFP concept (paranoia, major affective disorder with psychotic features, and psychotic disorder not elsewhere classified) showed the same gradient, with the exception of paranoia, which showed a lower rate in the urban area. The prevalence of schizophrenia was higher among males, while for paranoia the prevalence was higher among females.
PubMed ID
2788354 View in PubMed
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Life expectancies for individuals with psychiatric diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52336
Source
Public Health. 2001 Sep;115(5):328-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
H. Hannerz
P. Borgå
M. Borritz
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Surveillance, National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Public Health. 2001 Sep;115(5):328-37
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - mortality
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality
Mental Retardation - mortality
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Mood Disorders - mortality
Neurotic Disorders - mortality
Personality Disorders - mortality
Public Health
Schizophrenia - mortality
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - mortality
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to estimate life expectancies in different diagnostic groups for individuals treated as inpatients at Swedish psychiatric clinics. All individuals, older than 18 y and alive on the first of January 1983, who had been registered in the National Hospital Discharge Registry by a psychiatric clinic in 1978-82, were monitored for mortality during 1983 by using the National Cause of Death Registry. The study group consisted of 91 385 men and 77 217 women. The patients were divided into nine diagnostic groups according to the principal diagnosis registered at the latest discharge. Actuarial mathematics was used to construct life expectancy tables, which present the number of years expected to live, by gender and diagnostic group.Expectancies of life were significantly shortened for both genders and in all nine diagnostic groups (with one exception). Mental disorders in general are life shortening. This fact should be recognised in community health when setting health priorities. It should also be addressed in curricula as well as in treatment and preventive programmes.
PubMed ID
11593442 View in PubMed
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Mortality among persons with a history as psychiatric inpatients with functional psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68364
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;35(8):380-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
H. Hannerz
P. Borgå
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Surveillance, National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. hh@ami.dk
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;35(8):380-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients
Life expectancy
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - mortality
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An important aim in all psychiatric care should be a reduction of overall mortality. Information on mortality patterns in different types of psychiatric populations is vital for a successful design of treatment strategies and preventive programmes. The present study aims to describe mortality among persons with a history as psychiatric inpatients with functional psychosis. METHODS: All psychiatric inpatients, 17,878 men and 23,256 women, registered in the Swedish National Hospital Discharge Registry between 1978 and 1982 with a functional psychosis (ICD-8 = 295-299) as principal diagnosis were followed for mortality during the time period 1983-85. Life tables were constructed and death rates for various types of causes of death were calculated. RESULTS: Compared to the general population, the excess mortality in the study group caused a reduction in life expectancy of 22.1-27.9% (95% CI) among the men and 15.0-21.7% among the women. In the age group 2049 years, 62% of the excess mortality was caused by suicide. In the age group 50-89 years, only 8% of the excess was suicide, while 52% was caused by cardiovascular disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Reduction in mortality rates requires different strategies in different age groups. Even if the suicide rate were reduced to zero, it would only have a marginal influence on the highly elevated mortality among patients in upper middle age and among the elderly. Among the younger patients (
PubMed ID
11037308 View in PubMed
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Patterns of care among people with long-term functional psychosis in three different areas of Stockholm County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226803
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1991 Mar;83(3):223-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
P. Borgå
B. Widerlöv
J. Cullberg
C G Stefansson
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Research Unit, Nacka, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1991 Mar;83(3):223-33
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Disorders, Psychotic - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Long-Term Care - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Paranoid Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Environment
Social Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study of long-term functionally psychotic people in Stockholm County describes the psychiatric and somatic care provided as well as social welfare support and medication in a total cohort. This group included all non-organic cases of psychosis aged 18-64 years. The group was found still to be very dependent on institutional care, with an average of 75 d of psychiatric inpatient care. Males spent twice as long as females as inpatients, and people from the urban area spent a longer time than those from the other areas. Antipsychotic medication increased from the rural to the urban area. The diagnosis of schizophrenia and early age at onset were each per se associated with higher likelihood of inpatient treatment and depot medication. Contrary to expectations, medication with antipsychotic drugs was shown to increase with illness duration.
PubMed ID
1674397 View in PubMed
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Social conditions in a total population with long-term functional psychosis in three different areas of Stockholm County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11861
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1992 Jun;85(6):465-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
P. Borgå
B. Widerlöv
C G Stefansson
J. Cullberg
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Research Unit, Nacka, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1992 Jun;85(6):465-73
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Marriage - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sex Factors
Social Conditions
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A number of social conditions regarding interpersonal relations, housing and employment were studied in a total population of individuals with long-term functional psychosis (n = 341) drawn from the population aged 18-64 years inhabiting three different areas of Stockholm County, altogether about 57,000 inhabitants. Individuals were included irrespective of whether they had a psychiatric treatment contact or not. They were mostly unmarried (57%) and living alone (64%). Most were unemployed (69%) and over half received a disability pension. However, 76% had their own flat and a reasonable financial standard, not deteriorating with illness duration. The diagnosis of schizophrenia led to poorer social conditions, as did early age at onset, male sex and co-morbidity of substance abuse. A larger number of individuals lived in an institution in the urban area while a greater number lived with relatives in the rural area.
PubMed ID
1642131 View in PubMed
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