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Abdominal injuries associated with the use of seatbelts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230885
Source
Am J Surg. 1989 May;157(5):457-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
J P Appleby
A G Nagy
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Canada.
Source
Am J Surg. 1989 May;157(5):457-8
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - etiology
Accidents, Traffic
British Columbia
Colon - injuries
Contusions - etiology
Digestive System - injuries
Female
Humans
Intestinal Perforation - etiology
Intestine, Small - injuries
Male
Mesentery - injuries
Middle Aged
Seat Belts - adverse effects
Spinal Injuries - etiology
Abstract
The mandatory use of seatbelts has become commonplace in Canada, and such legislation was adopted by the province of British Columbia in 1977. This has provided us with an opportunity to study the effects of seatbelt restraints on accident victims, particularly concerning abdominal injuries. Five hundred sixty-two patient charts were reviewed during a 3-year period. Documented use of seatbelts was found in 126 cases. Thirty-six of these patients underwent laparotomy and form the basis of this study. Compared with previously reported figures for blunt abdominal trauma, there was a high incidence of gastrointestinal injuries (67 percent). In addition, associated lumbar spine injuries were found in a large proportion of patients (19 percent, p less than 0.005). We found an increased risk of spinal injury in patients wearing a lap versus a three-point belt.
PubMed ID
2712201 View in PubMed
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Diversity of dietary patterns observed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18549
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
N. Slimani
M. Fahey
A A Welch
E. Wirfält
C. Stripp
E. Bergström
J. Linseisen
M B Schulze
C. Bamia
Y. Chloptsios
F. Veglia
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
M C Ocké
M. Brustad
E. Lund
C A González
A. Barcos
G. Berglund
A. Winkvist
A. Mulligan
P. Appleby
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
P. Ferrari
W A Van Staveren
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert-Thomas, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France. Slimani@iarc.fr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the diversity in dietary patterns existing across centres/regions participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: Single 24-hour dietary recall measurements were obtained by means of standardised face-to-face interviews using the EPIC-SOFT software. These have been used to present a graphic multi-dimensional comparison of the adjusted mean consumption of 22 food groups. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 men and women, aged 35-74 years, participating in the EPIC nested calibration study. RESULTS: Although wide differences were observed across centres, the countries participating in EPIC are characterised by specific dietary patterns. Overall, Italy and Greece have a dietary pattern characterised by plant foods (except potatoes) and a lower consumption of animal and processed foods, compared with the other EPIC countries. France and particularly Spain have more heterogeneous dietary patterns, with a relatively high consumption of both plant foods and animal products. Apart from characteristics specific to vegetarian groups, the UK 'health-conscious' group shares with the UK general population a relatively high consumption of tea, sauces, cakes, soft drinks (women), margarine and butter. In contrast, the diet in the Nordic countries, The Netherlands, Germany and the UK general population is relatively high in potatoes and animal, processed and sweetened/refined foods, with proportions varying across countries/centres. In these countries, consumption of vegetables and fruit is similar to, or below, the overall EPIC means, and is low for legumes and vegetable oils. Overall, dietary patterns were similar for men and women, although there were large gender differences for certain food groups. CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable differences in food group consumption and dietary patterns among the EPIC study populations. This large heterogeneity should be an advantage when investigating the relationship between diet and cancer and formulating new aetiological hypotheses related to dietary patterns and disease.
PubMed ID
12639235 View in PubMed
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