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CSF shunt infections in children: experiences from a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30951
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2003 Apr;145(4):243-8; discussion 248
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
P Ø Enger
F. Svendsen
K. Wester
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen School of Medicine, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2003 Apr;145(4):243-8; discussion 248
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Candidiasis - epidemiology - etiology
Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Hydrocephalus - epidemiology - surgery
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The objective was to identify risk factors for shunt infections, and establish the rate of infection for shunt procedures carried out under standardized conditions in a well-defined population. All (407) paediatric shunt operations (primary and revisions) performed within a total population of 630000 inhabitants between January 1, 1986 and December 31, 1996, were analysed retrospectively. 11 shunt infections were diagnosed in 10 patients, giving an overall infection rate of 2.7% per procedure and 6.2% per patient. Infections were significantly correlated with age, type of operation, and a etiology of hydrocephalus. Thus, infections occurred more frequently during the first 6 months of life, more often following primary shunt insertions compared with revisions, and children with myelomeningocele had a higher infection risk than children with hydrocephalus due to other causes. There was a highly significant male preponderance in the patient material. Conclusion: The overall infection rate was relatively low. The risk factors for shunt infections appear to relate to epidemiological characteristics rather than to surgical factors.
PubMed ID
12748883 View in PubMed
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Gamma knife surgery of meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus: long-term follow-up of 100 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97633
Source
Neurosurgery. 2010 Apr;66(4):661-8; discussion 668-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Bente Sandvei Skeie
P O Enger
G O Skeie
F. Thorsen
P-H Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. bsai@helse-bergen.no
Source
Neurosurgery. 2010 Apr;66(4):661-8; discussion 668-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cavernous Sinus - surgery
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meningeal Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Meningioma - pathology - surgery
Middle Aged
Radiosurgery - methods
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Resection of meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus often is incomplete and associated with considerable morbidity. As a result, an increasing number of patients with such tumors have been treated with gamma knife surgery (GKS). However, few studies have investigated the long-term outcome for this group of patients. METHODS: 100 patients (23 male/77 female) with meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus received GKS at the Department of Neurosurgery at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, between November 1988 and July 2006. They were followed for a mean of 82.0 (range, 0-243) months. Only 2 patients were lost to long-term follow-up. Sixty patients underwent craniotomy before radiosurgery, whereas radiosurgery was the primary treatment for 40 patients. RESULTS: Tumor growth control was achieved in 84.0% of patients. Twelve patients required re-treatment: craniotomy (7), radiosurgery (1), or both (4). Three out of 5 patients with repeated radiosurgery demonstrated secondary tumor growth control. Excluding atypical meningiomas, the growth control rate was 90.4%. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year actuarial tumor growth control rates are 98.9%, 94.2%, and 91.6%, respectively. Treatment failure was preceded by clinical symptoms in 14 of 15 patients. Most tumor growths appeared within 2.5 years. Only one third grew later (range, 6-20 yr). The complication rate was 6.0%: optic neuropathy (2), pituitary dysfunction (3), worsening of diplopia (1), and radiation edema (1). Mortality was 0. At last follow-up, 88.0% were able to live independent lives. CONCLUSION: GKS gives long-term growth control and has a low complication rate. Most tumor growths manifest within 3 years following treatment. However, some appear late, emphasizing the need for long-term follow-up.
PubMed ID
20305491 View in PubMed
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