Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Adoptively transferred late allergic airway responses are associated with Th2-type cytokines in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57629
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1997 Jan;16(1):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
A. Watanabe
H. Mishima
T C Kotsimbos
M. Hojo
P M Renzi
J G Martin
Q A Hamid
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1997 Jan;16(1):69-74
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Airway Resistance
Animals
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology - immunology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - transplantation
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - transplantation
Interferon Type II - biosynthesis
Interleukin-2 - biosynthesis
Interleukin-4 - biosynthesis
Interleukin-5 - biosynthesis
Interleukins - biosynthesis
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology
Th2 Cells - immunology
Abstract
Late allergic airway responses can be transferred by CD4+ T cells in the rat. To investigate the role of T-cell cytokines in these responses, we examined the expression of mRNA for Th2 (interleukin [IL]-4 and IL-5) and Th1 (IL-2 and interferon gamma [INF-gamma])-type cytokines in Brown Norway rats that were administered either antigen-primed W3/25(CD4)+ or OX8(CD8)+ T cells. Donors were actively sensitized by subcutaneous injection of ovalbumin (OVA) in the neck and T cells were obtained from the cervical lymph nodes by immunomagnetic cell sorting for administration to unsensitized rats. Control rats received bovine serum albumin (BSA)-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Two days later, recipient rats were challenged with aerosolized OVA, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 8 h after challenge. BAL cells expressing mRNA for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and INF-gamma were analyzed using the technique of in situ hybridization. Recipients of OVA-primed CD4+ T cells had an increase in the fraction of BAL cells expressing mRNA for IL-4 and IL-5 compared with BSA-primed CD4+ or OVA-primed CD8+ cells (P
PubMed ID
8998081 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoptive transfer of allergic airway responses with sensitized lymphocytes in BN rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57674
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Jul;152(1):64-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
A. Watanabe
P. Rossi
P M Renzi
L J Xu
R D Guttmann
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Jul;152(1):64-70
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Eosinophils - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology - physiopathology
Serum Albumin, Bovine - immunology
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
To evaluate the role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of allergic bronchoconstriction, we investigated whether allergic airway responses are adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in Brown Norway (BN) rats. Animals were actively sensitized to ovalbumin (OA) or sham sensitized, and 14 d later mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from intrathoracic lymph nodes, passed through a nylon wool column, and transferred to naive syngeneic rats. Recipients were challenged with aerosolized OA or bovine serum albumin (BSA) (5% wt/vol) and analyzed for changes in lung resistance (RL), airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (MCh), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. Recipients of MNCs from sensitized rats responded to OA inhalation and exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the 8-h observation period, but without usual early airway responses. Recipients of sham-sensitized MNCs or BSA-challenged recipients failed to respond to antigen challenge. At 32 h after OA exposure, airway responsiveness to MCh was increased in four of seven rats that had received sensitized MNCs (p = 0.035). BAL eosinophils increased at 32 h in the recipients of both sensitized and sham-sensitized MNCs. However, eosinophil numbers in BAL were inversely correlated with airway responsiveness in the recipients of sensitized MNCs (r = -0.788, p = 0.036). OA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) was undetectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in recipient rats following adoptive transfer. In conclusion, allergic late airway responses (LAR) and cholinergic airway hyperresponsiveness, but not antigen-specific IgE and early responses, were adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in BN rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7599864 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cytokine expression in the presence or absence of late airway responses after antigen challenge of sensitized rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15836
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1996 Sep;15(3):367-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
P M Renzi
A S al Assaad
J. Yang
Z. Yasruel
Q. Hamid
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Pathology, Meakins Christie Labs, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1996 Sep;15(3):367-73
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens - pharmacology
Autoradiography
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology
Cytokines - genetics
Gene Expression - immunology
In Situ Hybridization
Lung - immunology - physiopathology
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology - pharmacology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess whether Th-2 cytokines are involved in the late airway response (LR) after antigen challenge, we evaluated cytokine mRNA expression in the lungs of two strains of rats before and 8 h after saline or antigen challenge: Brown Norway (BN) rats, high IgE producers that develop LR after antigen challenge and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, low IgE producers that develop little LR and no increased airway responsiveness after antigen challenge. Rats were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA) and 14 days later, lungs were obtained before or after OA challenge and measurement of lung physiology for 8 h. Lung tissue was either fixed for in situ hybridization or frozen for evaluation of mRNA expression by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We examined mRNA expression for interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-5 (Th-2 cytokines) and IL-2 and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma, Th-1 cytokines). In situ hybridization showed that cells expressing IL-4 and -5 mRNA were increased in the airways of the lungs of BN rats after OA challenge (P
PubMed ID
8810641 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of dexamethasone on airway inflammation and responsiveness after antigen challenge of the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57718
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Oct;148(4 Pt 1):932-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
P M Renzi
R. Olivenstein
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Health Network of Centres of Excellence, André Viallet Research Institute, St-Luc Hospital, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Oct;148(4 Pt 1):932-9
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Antigens - immunology
Bronchitis - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Dexamethasone - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Immunization
Lung - cytology - drug effects - physiopathology
Lymphocyte Subsets - drug effects
Male
Methacholine Chloride - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Mechanics - drug effects - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of dexamethasone on airway responsiveness and lung inflammation of rats at 8 h, 32 h, and 7 d after allergen challenge. Brown-Norway male rats, 7 to 8 wk old, were actively sensitized to ovalbumin (OA) and challenged 14 d later. The rats were divided into a control group (n = 31) and a test group (n = 34) that received dexamethasone (DEXA) (0.3 mg/kg intraperitoneally) 14 h and 2 h before saline or OA challenge. For challenge, rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital and intubated endotracheally. Aerosols of OA (5% wt/vol in saline) were administered for 5 min. Responsiveness to inhaled aerosols of methacholine and the total and differential leukocyte counts in the large airways (generations 0 to 5), small airways, and parenchyma isolated by tissue mincing and digestion were measured at 8 h, 32 h, and 7 d after OA challenge. The cellular influx into the airways and parenchyma was highest at 8 h and decreased progressively over 7 d. DEXA significantly inhibited the cellular influx after allergen challenge. At 8 h, cellular return from the large airways was 3.61 +/- 0.5 x 10(6) (controls) versus 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(6) (DEXA), and from the small airways and parenchyma was 31.7 +/- 2.8 x 10(6) (controls) versus 21.9 +/- 2.9 x 10(6) (DEXA) (p
PubMed ID
8214947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of interleukin-2 on the airway response to antigen in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57745
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Jul;146(1):163-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
P M Renzi
S. Sapienza
S. Waserman
T. Du
R. Olivenstein
N S Wang
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins Christie Laboratories, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Jul;146(1):163-9
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens - administration & dosage
Bronchi - pathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - immunology
Bronchoconstriction - physiology
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Interleukin-2 - pharmacology - physiology
Leukocyte Count
Lung - pathology
Lymphocytes
Male
Mast Cells - pathology
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
To evaluate the hypothesis that lymphocyte stimulation can modify the bronchoconstrictive response to inhalational challenge with an allergen, we administered interleukin-2 (IL-2), an important lymphokine in lymphocyte activation and proliferation, to actively sensitized rats. Brown Norway rats received either human recombinant IL-2 (n = 8) or its vehicle (n = 7) twice a day from the ninth to the fourteenth day after active sensitization to ovalbumin (OA) and were challenged with an aerosol of OA. Lung resistance (RL) during the early response increased to a maximum of 698 +/- 230% and 180 +/- 26% of baseline values in the animals receiving IL-2 and vehicle, respectively (p less than 0.025). The late response was threefold greater in IL-2-treated than in vehicle-treated animals (p = 0.01). IL-2 increased OA-specific IgG levels in the serum, but it did not significantly affect total or specific IgE levels. IL-2 caused an inflammatory infiltrate around the airways with significant increases in eosinophils, lymphocytes, and mast cells prior to antigen challenge. Our results indicate that stimulation of cell-mediated immunity can affect airway responsiveness to antigen.
PubMed ID
1626798 View in PubMed
Less detail

IL-3 does not affect the allergic airway responses and leukotriene production after allergen challenge in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15652
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 May;13(5):970-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
T. Du
J G Martin
L J Xu
W S Powell
P M Renzi
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 May;13(5):970-5
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens
Animals
Asthma - immunology
Eosinophils - immunology
Humans
Interleukin-3 - pharmacology
Leukotrienes - biosynthesis
Male
Mast Cells - immunology
Ovalbumin
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Recombinant Proteins - pharmacology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
T cell cytokines are important in asthma. Interleukin (IL)-3, an important growth factor for mast cells and eosinophils has been shown to be increased in the airways of asthmatic subjects, but its precise functions are uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine whether recombinant human (rh) IL-3 affected airway responses, inflammation and leukotriene production after antigen challenge in Brown Norway (BN) rats. Having established that rhIL-3 (>12.5 microg subcutaneously b.i.d. for 4 days) caused a doubling of mast cell numbers in the airways of BN rats, sensitized rats were pretreated with rhIL-3 (50 microg) or vehicle subcutaneously b.i.d. for 4 days. Ovalbumin (OA) challenge was performed and the early (EAR), and late (LAR) airway response and the associated biliary leukotriene (LT) excretion measured. The pulmonary cellularity was evaluated by means of lung digestion 8 h after challenge. IL-3 increased the number of eosinophils isolated from the lungs after antigen challenge (0.77+/-0.23 versus 0.38+/-0.12 x 10(6) cells, p=0.03). However, there were no effects on the numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages. Neither the EAR nor the LAR after OA challenge were altered by IL-3. Likewise biliary cysteinyl-LT excretion was similar in IL-3-treated animals and controls after challenge. In conclusion, interleukin-3 caused an increase in the numbers of mast cells and eosinophils around the airways without affecting the magnitude of either early or late airway responses or mediator release after antigen challenge. The present results suggest that airway inflammation can occur in rats without increasing the allergic asthmatic response.
PubMed ID
10414391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA and immunoreactivity in the lungs of rats eight hours after antigen challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15790
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1997 Jul;17(1):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
P M Renzi
N. Sebastiao
A S al Assaad
A. Giaid
Q. Hamid
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Pathology, Meakins Christic Labs, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1997 Jul;17(1):36-40
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Immunization
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization
Kinetics
Lung - cytology - enzymology - immunology
Male
Nitric Oxide Synthase - biosynthesis
Ovalbumin - immunology
Protein Biosynthesis
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serum Albumin, Bovine - immunology
Time Factors
Transcription, Genetic
Abstract
We have previously shown that inducible nitric oxide (iNO)-synthase immunoreactivity is expressed in bronchial epithelium and increased in asthma which suggests a possible role for NO in airway hyperresponsiveness. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of a sensitized animal to antigen could account for the increased expression of iNO-synthase in the airways. We examined the expression of iNO-synthase mRNA and immunoreactivity in the lungs of ovalbumin (OA) sensitized Brown Norway (BN) rats 8 h after antigen challenge by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. Sensitized and unchallenged or bovine serum albumin (BSA) challenged rats, or unsensitized and OA challenged rats served as controls. With the use of an iNO-synthase probe we found a higher expression of iNO-synthase mRNA in BN rat airways after antigen challenge with OA but not after antigen challenge with BSA or in other controls. Most of the expression was in the epithelium of the airways with few cells positive in the subepithelial inflammatory infiltrate or in lung lavage. Very strong iNO-synthase immunoreactivity was observed in the airway epithelium of sensitized and OA challenged rats. No significant immunoreactivity was observed in the inflammatory infiltrate of the airways or in lung parenchyma. In conclusion, iNO-synthase increases in the airways of sensitized rats after exposure to antigen, the major source being from airway epithelial cells. NO may have a role in the development of the late airway response and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.
PubMed ID
9224207 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inflammatory cell populations in the airways and parenchyma after antigen challenge in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57723
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Apr;147(4):967-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
P M Renzi
R. Olivenstein
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
André Viallet Research Institute and Pulmonary Unit, St-Luc Hospital, University of Montreal, Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Apr;147(4):967-74
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Resistance
Animals
Antigens - administration & dosage
B-Lymphocytes - pathology
Bronchi - pathology
Immunization
Inflammation
Lung - pathology
Lymphocyte Subsets
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer - pathology
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - pathology
Urethane - immunology
Abstract
We examined the effects of sensitization and antigen challenge on the cellular populations retrieved from the large airways (LA) (generations zero to 5 approximately) and small airways and parenchyma (S/P) of the rat. Male Brown-Norway rats, 7 to 8 wk of age, were either actively sensitized to ovalbumin (n = 24) or sham-sensitized to saline (n = 9), and, 14 days later, they were anesthetized with urethane, intubated endotracheally, and challenged. Aerosols of ovalbumin (5% wt/vol in saline for 5 min) or saline were administered to 12 and six rats, respectively, and measurements of pulmonary resistance (RL) were made for 8 h. The early airway response (ER) was calculated as the highest value of RL in the first hour after challenge, and the late response (LR) was calculated as an increase in RL to greater than 200% of the baseline value in the 4- to 8-h period after challenge. Rats were killed by exsanguination, LA were separated from S/P, and cells were isolated after tissue mincing and digestion with collagenase. Total and differential cell counts and lymphocyte subsets were determined. Antigen challenge significantly increased the cellular yield (mostly neutrophils) from the LA and S/P. Animals with a LR had a lower total cellular yield from the LA and S/P than did animals without a LR. The animals with a LR also had a lower yield of eosinophils and lymphocytes from the S/P than did animals challenged with saline alone. Cellular yields were not lower in the animals with an isolated ER after antigen challenge.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8466135 View in PubMed
Less detail

Paper stamp checklist tool enhances asthma guidelines knowledge and implementation by primary care physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168783
Source
Can Respir J. 2006 May-Jun;13(4):193-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
P M Renzi
H. Ghezzo
S. Goulet
E. Dorval
R L Thivierge
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, 2065 Alexandre de Sève Z8905, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. renzip@earthlink.net
Source
Can Respir J. 2006 May-Jun;13(4):193-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - therapy
Humans
Physicians, Family
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quebec
Abstract
The Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for the management of asthmatic patients were last published in 1999, with updates in 2001 and June 2004. Large disparities exist in the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice.
The present study evaluated the knowledge of Quebec-based primary care physicians regarding the CPGs, as well as patient outcomes before and after introducing physicians to a new clinical tool--a memory aid in the form of a self-inking paper stamp checklist summarizing CPG criteria and guidelines for assessing asthmatic patient control and therapy. The primary objective of the present study was to assess whether the stamp would improve physicians' knowledge of the CPGs, and as a secondary objective, to assess whether it would decrease patient emergency room visits and hospitalizations.
A prospective, randomized, controlled study of 104 primary care physicians located in four Quebec regions was conducted. Each physician initially responded to questions on their knowledge of the CPGs, and was then randomly assigned to one of four groups that received information about the CPGs while implementing an intervention (the stamp tool) aimed at supporting their decision-making process at the point of care. Six months later, the physicians were retested, and patient outcomes for approximately one year were obtained from the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec.
The stamp significantly improved physicians' knowledge of the CPGs in all Quebec regions tested, and reduced emergency room visits and hospitalizations in patients who were followed for at least one year.
A paper stamp summarizing CPGs for asthma can be used effectively to increase the knowledge of physicians and to positively affect patient outcomes.
Notes
Cites: Acad Med. 2004 May;79(5):386-9315107277
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Oct 26;325(7370):94112399345
Cites: Can Respir J. 2004 Sep;11(6):427-3315510250
Cites: JAMA. 1992 Sep 2;268(9):1111-71501333
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Sep 6;274(9):700-57650822
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1473-88520339
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Aug 15;157(4):408-169275952
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Aug 15;317(7156):465-89703533
Cites: Br J Nurs. 1998 Nov 26-Dec 9;7(21):1313-510076205
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Oct 20;282(15):1458-6510535437
Cites: Allergy Asthma Proc. 1999 Sep-Oct;20(5):317-2110566102
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2000 Jul;16(1):15-2110933079
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Oct;160(4):1254-6210508816
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Mar 12;330(7491):585-915761000
Cites: Can Respir J. 2004 May-Jun;11 Suppl A:9A-18A15254605
Cites: Chest. 2000 Aug;118(2 Suppl):33S-39S10939997
Cites: Chest. 2000 Aug;118(2 Suppl):62S-64S10940002
Cites: Can Respir J. 2000 Nov-Dec;7(6):456-6511121090
Cites: Med Care. 2001 Aug;39(8 Suppl 2):II46-5411583121
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Apr 27;324(7344):1003-511976240
Cites: Hosp Q. 2002 Spring;5(3):55-6012055868
Erratum In: Can Respir J. 2006 Jul-Aug;13(5):279
PubMed ID
16779463 View in PubMed
Less detail

Transfer of allergic airway responses with antigen-primed CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells in brown Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57669
Source
J Clin Invest. 1995 Sep;96(3):1303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
A. Watanabe
H. Mishima
P M Renzi
L J Xu
Q. Hamid
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Clin Invest. 1995 Sep;96(3):1303-10
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Comparative Study
Eosinophils - cytology - immunology
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Immunity, Cellular
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Inflammation
Leukocyte Count
Lung - immunology
Lymph Nodes - immunology
Lymphocyte Activation
Lymphocyte Transfusion
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory System - immunology
Serum Albumin, Bovine - immunology
Skin Tests
T-Lymphocyte Subsets - immunology
Abstract
Activated CD4+ helper T cells have been demonstrated in asthmatic airways and postulated to play a central role in eliciting allergic inflammation; direct evidence of their involvement seems to be lacking. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells have the potential to induce allergic responses to antigen challenge, and tested this hypothesis in a model of allergic bronchoconstriction, the Brown Norway rat, using the approach of adoptive transfer. Animals were actively sensitized to either ovalbumin (OVA) or BSA and were used as donors of T cells. W3/25(CD4)+ or OX8(CD8)+ T cells were isolated from the cervical lymph nodes of sensitized donors and transferred to naive BN rats. 2 d after adoptive transfer recipient rats were challenged by OVA inhalation, and changes in lung resistance (RL), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells, and serum levels of antigen-specific IgE were studied. After OVA challenge recipients of OVA-primed W3/25+ T cells exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the entire 8-h observation period and had significant bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia, which was detected by immunocytochemistry using an antimajor basic protein mAb. Recipients of BSA-primed W3/25+ T cells or OVA-primed OX8+ T cells failed to respond to inhaled OVA. OVA-specific immunoglobulin E was undetectable by ELISA or skin testing in any of the recipient rats after adoptive transfer. In conclusion, antigen-induced airway bronchoconstriction and eosinophilia were successfully transferred by antigen-specific W3/25+ T cells in Brown Norway rats. These responses were dependent on antigen-primed W3/25+ T cells and appeared to be independent of IgE-mediated mast cell activation. This study provides clear evidence for T cell mediated immune mechanisms in allergic airway responses in this experimental model.
PubMed ID
7657805 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.