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Affective disorders in neurological diseases: a case register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184948
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003 Jul;108(1):41-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
F M Nilsson
L V Kessing
T M Sørensen
P K Andersen
T G Bolwig
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. fmn@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003 Jul;108(1):41-50
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Abstract
To investigate the temporal relationships between a range of neurological diseases and affective disorders.
Data derived from linkage of the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and the Danish National Hospital Register. Seven cohorts with neurological index diagnoses and two control group diagnoses were followed for up to 21 years. The incidences of affective disorders in the different groups were compared with the control groups, using competing risks to consider the risk of affective disorder and the risk of death in the same analysis.
We found an increased incidence of affective disorders in dementia, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage compared with control groups. The association was found to be the strongest for dementia and Parkinson's disease. In hospitalized patients, with incident multiple sclerosis, the incidence of affective disorder was lower than the incidence in the control groups.
In neurological diseases there seems to be an increased incidence of affective disorders. The elevated incidence was found to be particularly high for dementia and Parkinson's disease (neurodegenerative diseases).
PubMed ID
12807376 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use and risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide case-time-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124362
Source
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Jul;92(1):72-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
P. Weeke
A. Jensen
F. Folke
G H Gislason
J B Olesen
C. Andersson
E L Fosbøl
J K Larsen
F K Lippert
S L Nielsen
T. Gerds
P K Andersen
J K Kanters
H E Poulsen
S. Pehrson
L. Køber
C. Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. pw@heart.dk
Source
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Jul;92(1):72-9
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - classification
Case-Control Studies
Citalopram - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Denmark
Depression - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nortriptyline - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Abstract
Treatment with some types of antidepressants has been associated with sudden cardiac death. It is unknown whether the increased risk is due to a class effect or related to specific antidepressants within drug classes. All patients in Denmark with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) were identified (2001-2007). Association between treatment with specific antidepressants and OHCA was examined by conditional logistic regression in case-time-control models. We identified 19,110 patients with an OHCA; 2,913 (15.2%) were receiving antidepressant treatment at the time of OHCA, with citalopram being the most frequently used type of antidepressant (50.8%). Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs; odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.50) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; OR = 1.21, CI: 1.00-1.47) were both associated with comparable increases in risk of OHCA, whereas no association was found for serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors/noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (SNRIs/NaSSAs; OR = 1.06, CI: 0.81-1.39). The increased risks were primarily driven by: citalopram (OR = 1.29, CI: 1.02-1.63) and nortriptyline (OR = 5.14, CI: 2.17-12.2). An association between cardiac arrest and antidepressant use could be documented in both the SSRI and TCA classes of drugs.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Mar;93(3):234-523249781
Comment In: Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Mar;93(3):23523299645
PubMed ID
22588605 View in PubMed
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Birth characteristics, sibling patterns, and acute leukemia risk in childhood: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22003
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Jul 2;89(13):939-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2-1997
Author
T. Westergaard
P K Andersen
J B Pedersen
J H Olsen
M. Frisch
H T Sørensen
J. Wohlfahrt
M. Melbye
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Jul 2;89(13):939-47
Date
Jul-2-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Birth Intervals
Birth Order
Birth weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1 - etiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - etiology
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Medical Record Linkage
Paternal Age
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The occurrence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) during childhood may be influenced by factors operating in fetal life. Furthermore, childhood ALL has been suggested to be linked to patterns of infection during infancy. PURPOSE: To explore these hypotheses and other associations, we studied the impact of sibling patterns (e.g., birth order) and birth characteristics (e.g., birth weight) on the risk of childhood ALL and AML. METHODS: By linkage of records of population-based registries, a cohort of all children whose mothers were born in Denmark from April 1935 through March 1978 was established. Children who developed ALL or AML during the period from April 1968 through December 1992 were identified by linkage with the Danish Cancer Registry. Birth weights were obtained for children born during the period from January 1973 through December 1992 by linkage with the Medical Birth Registry. RESULTS: The cohort of approximately 2.0 million children was followed for the diagnosis of ALL or AML for 20.9 million person-years. A total of 704 cases of childhood ALL were identified. Among 0-4 year olds, the relative risks (RRs) of ALL for birth order positions 1, 2, 3, and 4+ were 1.00 (reference), 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.68-1.07), 0.91 (95% CI = 0.66-1.25), and 0.57 (95% CI = 0.30-1.06), respectively (P for trend = .09). A decreasing trend was not observed among 5-14 year olds. A significant log-linear association between birth weight and the risk of ALL was observed for both age groups. Overall, the RR of ALL increased by a factor of 1.46 (95% CI = 1.18-1.81) (P = .0005) for each kilogram of increase in birth weight. A total of 114 cases of childhood AML were identified. Children born second or later in the birth order had an increased risk of AML (RR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.01-2.32) compared with firstborns. A particularly high risk of AML at ages 2 (RR = 2.53; 95% CI = 1.46-4.40) and 3 years was associated with having siblings compared with being an only child at those ages. Similar to the findings for ALL risk, there was a significant association between birth weight and AML risk. The relative increase in AML risk per 1-kg increase in birth weight was 2.14 (95% CI = 1.19-3.85; P = .009). CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: The association between birth weight and childhood leukemia suggests the importance of intrauterine factors. A plausible explanation may be that increasing birth weight is associated with a higher rate of cell proliferation and/or a larger number of precursor cells being at risk of malignant transformation. The inverse association between birth order and ALL risk among 0-4 year olds was weak, but it was compatible with the hypothesis that delayed exposure to infection may increase the risk of ALL in this age group. The association of childhood AML with birth order and sibship size at young ages deserves further attention in the search for environmental factors that affect childhood AML risk.
PubMed ID
9214673 View in PubMed
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Birth order, sibship size and risk of Hodgkin's disease in children and young adults: a population-based study of 31 million person-years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21918
Source
Int J Cancer. 1997 Sep 17;72(6):977-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1997
Author
T. Westergaard
M. Melbye
J B Pedersen
M. Frisch
J H Olsen
P K Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen. twe@ssi.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 1997 Sep 17;72(6):977-81
Date
Sep-17-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Birth Order
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Nuclear Family
Paternal Age
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
It has been proposed that Hodgkin's disease (HD) may have an infectious origin and that delayed exposure to infection may increase the risk of HD in young adults. This hypothesis is addressed by studying the family structure among children and young adults. The Civil Registration System was used to establish a population-based cohort consisting of all persons whose mothers were born in Denmark since 1935. Persons who developed HD were identified by linkage with the Danish Cancer Registry. HD incidence rate ratios were estimated based on a log-linear Poisson regression model. The cohort of 2.1 million persons (aged 0-42 years) was followed for 31.1 million person years, during which period 378 cases of HD occurred. Among children ( or = 15 years, n = 306) the risk of HD, on the contrary, tended to decrease with increasing sibship size [trend = 0.91 (95% CI, 0.81-1.03)] and birth order (trend = 0.85 (95% CI, 0.71-1.01). These trends among young adults were significantly different from the corresponding trends among children (p
PubMed ID
9378561 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factor profile in subjects with familial predisposition to myocardial infarction in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50074
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Jun;51(3):266-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
M. Hippe
J. Vestbo
A M Bjerg
K. Borch-Johnsen
M. Appleyard
H O Hein
P K Andersen
G. Jensen
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Jun;51(3):266-71
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - genetics - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Parents
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Triglycerides - analysis
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To identify possible modifiable mediators of familial predisposition to myocardial infarction (MI) by assessing the risk factor profile in individuals without MI in relation to parental occurrence of MI. DESIGN AND METHODS: Cross sectional survey of the general population. The odds of an adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile in subjects reporting parental occurrence of MI versus subjects not reporting parental occurrence were estimated by logistic regression models. SETTING: The Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, where subjects investigated in three Danish prospective population studies are integrated. PARTICIPANTS: Subjects were 9306 females and 11,091 males aged 20-75 years with no history of MI. A total of 1370 subjects reported maternal MI and 2583 reported paternal MI. MAIN RESULTS: Increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, increased cholesterol level, low ratio between high density lipoprotein (HDL) and total cholesterol (TC), and heavy smoking, were more frequent in subjects with parental occurrence of MI than in controls irrespective of sex and age of the subjects. Maternal MI was more predictive for increased cholesterol and decreased HDL/ TC ratio than paternal MI, and the risk of an increased cholesterol level was higher in subjects aged 20-39 years than in older subjects. No differences in body mass index, triglycerides, and physical inactivity were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects free of previous MI who reported a parental occurrence of MI had an adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile regarding systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, the ratio between HDL and total cholesterol, and smoking. Thus, these modifiable risk factors may be mediators of the familial predisposition to MI.
PubMed ID
9229055 View in PubMed
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Cohabitation patterns among patients with severe psychiatric disorders in the entire Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121619
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 May;43(5):1013-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
A F Thomsen
M. Olsbjerg
P K Andersen
L V Kessing
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 May;43(5):1013-21
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Choice Behavior
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Incidence
Male
Marriage - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sexual Partners - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Assortative mating has been demonstrated in mental disorders but the extent of cohabitation between patients with clinically diagnosed psychiatric disease has been poorly explored. Method We conducted a register-based study of all Danes between 18 and 70 years of age in a 13-year observational period, linking data on individuals' contacts with psychiatric services with data on individuals' cohabitation status. Two different Poisson regression analyses were performed: the first comparing the rates of commencing cohabitation with a psychiatric patient between individuals, depending on whether the individuals themselves had, or did not have, a psychiatric diagnosis; the second comparing the incidence rates of psychiatric diagnoses for individuals cohabitating with psychiatric patients with the similar rates for individuals living with unaffected cohabitants.
In total, 159 929 (5.0%) out of 3 204 633 individuals were given a psychiatric diagnosis during the study period. Diagnosed individuals had an overall rate ratio (RR) of commencing cohabitation with a psychiatric patient of 1.95 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.90-2.00] for women and 1.65 (95% CI 1.61-1.69) for men, when compared with unaffected individuals. The overall RR of receiving a psychiatric diagnosis while cohabitating with a psychiatric patient was 2.40 (95% CI 2.31-2.49) for women and 2.91 (95% CI 2.81-3.01) for men, when compared with those cohabitating with unaffected individuals. Individuals with schizophrenia and men with bipolar disorder had the highest RR of commencing cohabitation with a cohabitant with a similar diagnosis.
Cohabitation among individuals with severe psychiatric disorders is increased. This has implications for research and for the clinical management of patients.
PubMed ID
22892210 View in PubMed
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[Consequences of incorrect interpretation of vaginal smear tests in a screening program]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23676
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Apr 25;156(17):2594-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-25-1994
Author
E. Lynge
E. Arffmann
P. Poll
P K Andersen
Author Affiliation
Kraeftens Bekaempelse, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Apr 25;156(17):2594-6
Date
Apr-25-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
False Negative Reactions
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
A nested case-control study was undertaken in the Maribo County cohort of 27,811 women with negative cervical smears. Fifty-three women who later developed invasive cervical cancer constituted the cases, and five matched controls were selected from the cohort for each case. A total of 633 previous negative smears for the cases and controls were reviewed independently by two pathologists. The review showed misclassification to be frequent in these smears, which were collected in the period 1966-82, and the odds ratio for patients compared with controls for having at least one positive smear was 22.12 (95% CI 7.54-64.94). The study thus shows that more cancer cases could have been prevented by the screening programme were the test to have been more sensitive. The study also shows, however, that the participating women would have to pay a considerable price in the form of unnecessary extra tests if the sensitivity was too high.
PubMed ID
8016968 View in PubMed
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Consistent high viral load of human papillomavirus 16 and risk of cervical carcinoma in situ: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20375
Source
Lancet. 2000 Jun 24;355(9222):2194-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-2000
Author
N. Ylitalo
P. Sørensen
A M Josefsson
P K Magnusson
P K Andersen
J. Pontén
H O Adami
U B Gyllensten
M. Melbye
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. nathalie.ylitalo@mep.ki.se
Source
Lancet. 2000 Jun 24;355(9222):2194-8
Date
Jun-24-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actins - analysis
Adult
Carcinoma in Situ - virology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Papillomavirus, Human - classification - genetics
Papovaviridae Infections - classification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sweden
Tumor Virus Infections - classification
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Vaginal Smears
Viral Load
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Persistent infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is believed to be a prerequisite for the development of cervical neoplasia. Persistence may depend on certain characteristics, such as viral load, which has so far been given little attention. We investigated the association between HPV 16 viral load and cervical carcinoma in situ. METHODS: We did a nested case-control study of women participating in cytological screening in Sweden. We used a sensitive quantitative PCR assay to estimate HPV 16 load in multiple smears for each woman, taken during a period of up to 26 years before diagnosis. We calculated C, values, which decrease as the number of viral DNA copies increases. FINDINGS: 2081 smears from 478 cases and 1754 smears from 608 controls were tested. Among cases, we found a consistently increased load of HPV 16 already 13 years or more before diagnosis, and when many smears were still cytologically normal. Women with high HPV 16 viral loads were at least 30 times the relative risk of HPV-16-negative women more than a decade before diagnosis. The increase in relative risk was constant over time. About 25% of women (95% CI 0.12-0.32) infected with a high viral load before age 25 years developed cervical carcinoma in situ within 15 years. INTERPRETATION: Cervical carcinoma in situ associated with HPV 16 occurs mainly in HPV-16-positive women who have consistently high viral loads long term. Women at high risk could be identified by use of a quantitative HPV test in addition to cytological screening.
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 2001 Jan-Feb;134(1):35
Comment In: Lancet. 2000 Jun 24;355(9222):2179-8010881885
PubMed ID
10881892 View in PubMed
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A Cox regression model for the relative mortality and its application to diabetes mellitus survival data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39429
Source
Biometrics. 1985 Dec;41(4):921-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985
Author
P K Andersen
K. Borch-Johnsen
T. Deckert
A. Green
P. Hougaard
N. Keiding
S. Kreiner
Source
Biometrics. 1985 Dec;41(4):921-32
Date
Dec-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - mortality
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Abstract
A Cox-type regression model for the ratio between the mortality in a cohort and that in a reference population is introduced. By means of the model it is possible to include in the survival analysis both individual (possibly time-dependent) characteristics for the study cohort and changing trends in the mortality in the reference population. This is particularly relevant in long-term follow-up studies where there may be considerable changes in the mortality in the reference population. Estimation procedures in the model are discussed and large-sample properties of the estimators are outlined. The model is applied to the analysis of two sets of data concerning the survival among insulin-dependent diabetics in Denmark.
PubMed ID
3830258 View in PubMed
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58 records – page 1 of 6.