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10 records – page 1 of 1.

[Bacteremia caused by zoonotic Salmonella types in greater Copenhagen in 1984-1988]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37781
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Feb 19;152(8):529-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-1990
Author
A. Lester
N H Eriksen
H. Nielsen
P B Nielsen
A. Friis-Møller
B G Bruun
J H Scheibel
K. Gaarslev
H J Kolmos
Author Affiliation
Hvidovre Hospital, København, klinisk mikrobiologisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Feb 19;152(8):529-32
Date
Feb-19-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Salmonella - classification
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Septicemia - epidemiology - microbiology
Serotyping
Zoonoses
Abstract
The five departments of clinical microbiology in Greater Copenhagen have together carried out a retrospective review of bacteraemia caused by the zoonotic Salmonella serotypes in the period 1984-1988 in the municipalities of Copenhagen and Frederiksberg and in the County of Copenhagen. A gradual increase in frequency was observed from 11 cases in 1984 to 58 cases in 1988. The serotype most commonly isolated was Salmonella dublin followed by Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium. S. dublin was found to be more invasive and more virulent than the other serotypes. Predisposing factors were present in 56% of the patients; the commonest of these was malignant disease. Fatal or complicated course of the disease were observed more frequently in predisposed patients than in persons who had previously been healthy. A total of 17% of the patients died and one fourth of these had ruptured aortic aneurysm probably on account of Salmonella arteritis. 20% developed recurrence of bacteraemia while in the remaining patients the disease ran an uncomplicated course. It is concluded that the marked increase in the number of cases and the serious course taken by the infection demonstrate a definite need for increased prophylactic efforts in the food industry.
PubMed ID
2309361 View in PubMed
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[Diphtheria in Denmark 1956-1989. Occurrence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and other diphtheria toxigenic bacteria]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37213
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Mar 11;153(11):769-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1991
Author
P B Nielsen
B. Scherling
J H Scheibel
W. Frederiksen
Author Affiliation
Statens Seruminstitut, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Mar 11;153(11):769-72
Date
Mar-11-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Corynebacterium Infections - epidemiology - history - prevention & control
Corynebacterium diphtheriae
Denmark - epidemiology
Diphtheria - epidemiology - history - microbiology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pharyngitis - microbiology
Tonsillitis - microbiology
Abstract
The public immunization program against diphtheria, established in 1941, has almost eradicated the disease in Denmark, and 1956 became the first year without any notified cases. Since then, toxigenic strains have only been isolated five times--three cases of clinical diphtheria due to Corynebacterium diphtheriae biovar. mitis and two cases of tonsillitis/pharyngitis due to Corynebacterium ulcerans. The source of the infection was not identified in any of the cases. The first case of diphtheria in 1968 was imported from abroad. The following two cases in 1983 and 1985 were due to strains of the same phage type and peptide profile as the strains isolated during the epidemic in Sweden in 1984-1986. This indicates that the Danish cases and the Swedish epidemic derived from the same source. The diphtheria immunity of the Danish population is decreasing, and the level of protection is approaching the Swedish level. The impact is that a situation like that in Sweden may be anticipated with diphtheria epidemic in the lowest socio-economical groups--the skid row dwellers, alcoholics and drug abusers--if the immunization program against diphtheria is not intensified.
PubMed ID
1901182 View in PubMed
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Hospital-acquired infections in a burns unit caused by an imported strain of Staphylococcus aureus with unusual multi-resistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243142
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1982 Jun;88(3):535-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1982
Author
F. Espersen
P B Nielsen
K. Lund
B. Sylvest
K. Jensen
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1982 Jun;88(3):535-41
Date
Jun-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Burn Units
Burns - complications
Carrier state
Cross Infection - etiology
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Staphylococcal Infections - microbiology - transmission
Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects
Abstract
During the past year five patients from countries in the Middle East admitted to a burns unit were found to harbour a strain of Staphylococcus aureus with unusual multi-resistance to antibiotics. The admission of the first patient was followed by an outbreak of infection with this strain involving ten patients in the unit. In addition five staff members were found to be nasal carriers of the strain. As a result of this incident, the following four patients admitted to the unit were isolated on admission and the spread of their strans was thus prevented. It is recommended that patients on admission to burns units, or similar departments with patients very susceptible to infection, are isolated until their bacterial floras have been examined.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1969 Sep 18;281(12):627-355194719
Cites: Lancet. 1970 Jan 31;1(7640):230-34189020
Cites: Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg. 1970;4(1):61-65477547
Cites: J Hyg (Lond). 1972 Jun;70(2):299-3124503871
Cites: Postgrad Med J. 1972 Jun;48(560):338-415049253
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1973 Mar 1;288(9):444-544567321
Cites: J Hyg (Lond). 1973 Mar;71(1):171-834571610
Cites: J Hyg (Lond). 1973 Dec;71(4):799-8144520515
Cites: J Hyg (Lond). 1974 Dec;73(3):375-824280406
Cites: J Hyg (Lond). 1975 Dec;75(3):445-741059710
Cites: Nouv Presse Med. 1976 Nov;5(39):2599-602995590
Cites: J Clin Pathol. 1977 Feb;30(2):165-7845264
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand B. 1977 Apr;85(2):143-52140585
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1979 Mar;139(3):273-9255552
PubMed ID
7086119 View in PubMed
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[Import of multiresistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Preventive measures against epidemic spread in a hospital environment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243538
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Jan 18;144(3):133-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-1982

[NEW REGULATIONS FOR THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CANCER CONTROL.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28861
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1965 Mar 18;127:393-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-18-1965
Author
E. KRAG
P B NIELSEN
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1965 Mar 18;127:393-4
Date
Mar-18-1965
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
PubMed ID
14346331 View in PubMed
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Non-typhoid Salmonella bacteraemia in Greater Copenhagen 1984 to 1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37119
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1991 Jun;10(6):486-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
A. Lester
N H Eriksen
H. Nielsen
P B Nielsen
A. Friis-Møller
B. Bruun
J. Scheibel
K. Gaarslev
H J Kolmos
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1991 Jun;10(6):486-90
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteremia - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gastroenteritis - complications
Humans
Immune Tolerance
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Salmonella - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections - complications - epidemiology
Serotyping
Travel
Abstract
A retrospective survey of non-typhoid Salmonella bacteraemia in the period 1984 to 1988 was carried out by the five departments of clinical microbiology in Greater Copenhagen. A total of 168 patients were identified. A gradual increase was observed from 11 cases in 1984 to 58 cases in 1988. The corresponding incidence per 100,000 inhabitants in Copenhagen rose from 0.9 in 1984 to 5.0 in 1988. During the same period the total registered incidence of human Salmonella infections in Denmark increased from 17.6 to 67.4 per 100,000 inhabitants. The serotype most often isolated from bacteraemic patients was Salmonella dublin followed by Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium. Salmonella dublin demonstrated enhanced invasive and pathogenic properties. Predisposing factors were present in 56% of the patients; the most common was malignant disease. A fatal or complicated course of the bacteraemia was observed more frequently in patients with underlying diseases than in persons who had previously been healthy. A total of 17% of the patients died; one-fifth of these had a ruptured aortic aneurysm. It is concluded that the substantial increase in the number of cases and the often serious course taken by the infection demonstrate a need for increased efforts at prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
1915383 View in PubMed
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A one-year survey of nosocomial bacteraemia at a Danish university hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39074
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1986 Dec;97(3):471-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
K. Eliasen
P B Nielsen
F. Espersen
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1986 Dec;97(3):471-8
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Catheters, Indwelling - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Infection - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Denmark
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Septicemia - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - mortality
Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Urinary Catheterization - adverse effects
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology
Abstract
A 1-year prospective study of nosocomial bacteraemia was performed at Hvidovre Hospital with special reference to frequency, focus of infection and prognosis. All patients were examined clinically in order to confirm the bacteraemia. In total, 98 hospital-acquired bacteraemias were observed, giving an incidence rate of 0.28%. Bacteraemia due to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis predominated. The overall mortality was 38%; 65% of the patients with S. aureus bacteraemia died, 25% due to the bacteraemia. The most common types of infection were urinary tract infections and intravenous catheter infections. Fifty-five of the bacteraemias were caused by foreign bodies, mostly urinary catheters and intravenous catheters, and in 14 cases the focus was unknown. The patient population was severely ill patients. We conclude that nosocomial bacteraemia occurs specially in severely ill patients often preceded by indwelling urinary or intravenous catheters. The patients seldom die due to the bacteraemia, but they die with concomitant bacteraemia.
PubMed ID
3540113 View in PubMed
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[Salmonella bacteremia in the greater Copenhagen area 1989 and 1990].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225852
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Aug 26;153(35):2439
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1991

A study of the incidence of neonatal conjunctivitis and of its bacterial causes including Chlamydia trachomatis. Clinical examination, culture and cytology of tear fluid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60331
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1984 Jun;62(3):461-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
I L Mølgaard
P B Nielsen
J. Kaern
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1984 Jun;62(3):461-71
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Bacteriological Techniques
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Conjunctivitis, Inclusion - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukocyte Count
Pregnancy
Tears - cytology - microbiology
Abstract
Out of 300 newborn infants who had conjunctival swabs inoculated for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and other bacteria, 72% had bacteria isolated 4 to 6 days after birth. Of these, Staph. albus constituted 51% and Staph. aureus 19%. None of the infants were Chlamydia positive. Five out of 112 mothers (4.5%) were Chlamydia positive from the cervix just before delivery. Nineteen of the neonates were treated for conjunctivitis within the first month of life. Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from 2, and Staph. aureus, alpha-Streptococci, Pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae from some of the other infants. A likely diagnosis could be made in 46% of these cases, while the remaining cultures showed only apathogenic bacteria or no growth. There was a fairly good accordance with observation of inflammatory cells in the tear fluid and the clinical picture, 17/19 = 90% showing neutrophilia. Despite failing aetiological diagnosis in several cases, the infants responded satisfactorily to local antibiotic treatment. 75% of the parents replied to questionnaires 2 months after birth concerning conjunctivitis within the first month of life. The replies showed that 58 = 25% had had conjunctivitis, of whom 17% had been treated with antibiotics.
PubMed ID
6380204 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.