Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Clinical aspects of a nationwide epidemic of severe haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132630
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lars Krogvold
Thore Henrichsen
Anna Bjerre
Damien Brackman
Henrik Dollner
Helga Gudmundsdottir
Gaute Syversen
Pål Aksel Næss
Hans Jacob Bangstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Oslo University hospital, Ulleval, 7 Oslo, Norway. lars.krogvold@medisin.uio.no
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:44
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Escherichia coli Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Abstract
Report a nationwide epidemic of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O103:H25 causing hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) in children.
Description of clinical presentation, complications and outcome in a nationwide outbreak.
Ten children (median age 4.3 years) developed HUS during the outbreak. One of these was presumed to be a part of the outbreak without microbiological proof. Eight of the patients were oligoanuric and in need of dialysis. Median need for dialysis was 15 days; one girl did not regain renal function and received a kidney transplant. Four patients had seizures and/or reduced consciousness. Cerebral oedema and herniation caused the death of a 4-year-old boy. Two patients developed necrosis of colon with perforation and one of them developed non-autoimmune diabetes.
This outbreak of STEC was characterized by a high incidence of HUS among the infected children, and many developed severe renal disease and extrarenal complications. A likely explanation is that the O103:H25 (eae and stx2-positive) strain was highly pathogen, and we suggest that this serotype should be looked for in patients with HUS caused by STEC, especially in severe forms or outbreaks.
Notes
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2008;8:4118387178
Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 May;117(5):1656-6216651320
Cites: Clin Lab Haematol. 2000 Feb;22(1):11-410762298
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2000 Sep-Oct;6(5):458-6510998375
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2001 Apr 1;183(7):1063-7011237831
Cites: Pediatr Nephrol. 2003 Dec;18(12):1229-3514593522
Cites: Pediatr Radiol. 2004 Oct;34(10):805-1015378218
Cites: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1990 Nov;11(4):518-241702151
Cites: J R Soc Med. 1990 Dec;83(12):773-52269961
Cites: Pediatrics. 1994 Jul;94(1):35-408008534
Cites: J Pediatr. 1994 Oct;125(4):511-87931868
Cites: J Pediatr. 1994 Oct;125(4):519-267931869
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Nov 2;272(17):1349-537933395
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1995 Feb;30(2):158-637738732
Cites: Pediatr Nephrol. 1995 Feb;9(1):117-97742210
Cites: Pediatr Surg Int. 1998 Apr;13(4):268-709553186
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Jun;9(6):1126-339621299
Cites: Pediatrics. 1997 Jul;100(1):E129200386
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1998 Nov;17(11):761-69923515
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Mar 19-25;365(9464):1073-8615781103
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Apr;16(4):1035-5015728781
Cites: Curr Opin Pediatr. 2005 Apr;17(2):200-415800412
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Apr;11(4):590-615829199
Cites: Pediatr Nephrol. 2005 Jun;20(6):786-9015834619
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2005 Oct 15;192(8):1422-916170761
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2005 Oct;28(10):2556-6216186301
Cites: Kathmandu Univ Med J (KUMJ). 2004 Oct-Dec;2(4):291-616388239
Cites: Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2008 Dec;5(6):801-1019014273
PubMed ID
21798000 View in PubMed
Less detail

In-depth evaluation of real-world car collisions: fatal and severe injuries in children are predominantly caused by restraint errors and unstrapped cargo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130731
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2011 Oct;12(5):491-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Marianne Skjerven-Martinsen
Pal Aksel Naess
Trond Boye Hansen
Torleiv Ole Rognum
Inggard Lereim
Arne Stray-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. m.s.martinsen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2011 Oct;12(5):491-9
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Child Restraint Systems
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Major improvements have taken place in the development of child restraint systems and in-car safety in general, but motor vehicle accidents remain the leading cause of death and disability in children. An interdisciplinary study was therefore performed to investigate the injury mechanisms in car collisions involving children.
Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) resulting in death or serious injuries to the drivers or their passengers in the southeastern part of Norway in the period 2007-2009 were included in the study if children less than 16 years of age were passengers. An investigation team examined the crash scene within 24 h of the accident. The internal and external environment of the vehicle was investigated, with particular focus on safety equipment and registration of child occupant contact points. Information was collected from witnesses, crash victims, the police, road authority reports, and medical records. Clinical or postmortem examinations were performed on the child occupants.
Fifteen high-impact car crashes involving 27 child occupants were investigated: 7 children died (median [range] age 8 (0-15) years), 8 were severely injured (8 [5-13] years), and 12 sustained minor or no injuries (3.5 [0-14] years). Fourteen out of 15 fatalities or severe injuries (MAIS =3) were found to be due to various safety errors: harness straps or seat belts incorrectly routed (5/15) or poorly adjusted (4/15), unstrapped luggage (4/15), or technical errors (1/15). All 7 of the fatally injured children died at the crash scene, and 6 died due to head/upper neck trauma. No safety errors were found among the 12 children with either minor or no injuries. No association was found between the instantaneous change in velocity (?V) and the injury severity.
The risk of child passengers being severely or fatally injured in MVCs is significantly higher when they are incorrectly restrained or exposed to unsecured heavy luggage. Appropriate crash investigations may provide important information regarding the injury mechanisms, which will be necessary for the implementation of preventive measures to reduce future fatalities.
PubMed ID
21972860 View in PubMed
Less detail

Trauma systems and early management of severe injuries in Scandinavia: review of the current state.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150193
Source
Injury. 2010 May;41(5):444-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Thomas Kristiansen
Kjetil Søreide
Kjetil G Ringdal
Marius Rehn
Andreas J Krüger
Andreas Reite
Terje Meling
Pål Aksel Naess
Hans Morten Lossius
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Air Ambulance Foundation, Department of Research, Drøbak, Norway. thomas.kristiansen@snla.no
Source
Injury. 2010 May;41(5):444-52
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration - standards - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Medical Technicians
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant
International Cooperation
Male
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Transfer - organization & administration
Physician's Role
Pregnancy
Registries
Rural health services - organization & administration
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients - organization & administration
Traumatology - education - organization & administration - trends
Triage - organization & administration
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - epidemiology
Abstract
Scandinavian countries face common challenges in trauma care. It has been suggested that Scandinavian trauma system development is immature compared to that of other regions. We wanted to assess the current status of Scandinavian trauma management and system development.
An extensive search of the Medline/Pubmed, EMBASE and SweMed+ databases was conducted. Wide coverage was prioritized over systematic search strategies. Scandinavian publications from the last decade pertaining to trauma epidemiology, trauma systems and early trauma management were included.
The incidence of severe injury ranged from 30 to 52 per 100,000 inhabitants annually, with about 90% due to blunt trauma. Parts of Scandinavia are sparsely populated with long pre-hospital distances. In accordance with other European countries, pre-hospital physicians are widely employed and studies indicate that this practice imparts a survival benefit to trauma patients. More than 200 Scandinavian hospitals receive injured patients, increasingly via multidisciplinary trauma teams. Challenges remain concerning pre-hospital identification of the severely injured. Improved triage allows for a better match between patient needs and the level of resources available. Trauma management is threatened by the increasing sub-specialisation of professions and institutions. Scandinavian research is leading the development of team- and simulation-based trauma training. Several pan-Scandinavian efforts have facilitated research and provided guidelines for clinical management.
Scandinavian trauma research is characterised by an active collaboration across countries. The current challenges require a focus on the role of traumatology within an increasingly fragmented health care system. Regional networks of predictable and accountable pre- and in-hospital resources are needed for efficient trauma systems. Successful development requires both novel research and scientific assessment of imported principles of trauma care.
PubMed ID
19540486 View in PubMed
Less detail

Treatment of splenic trauma in Norway: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294703
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2017 Nov 23; 25(1):112
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-23-2017
Author
Trond Dehli
Jorunn Skattum
Bjørn Christensen
Ole-Petter Vinjevoll
Bent-Åge Rolandsen
Christine Gaarder
Pål Aksel Næss
Torben Wisborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, University Hospital North Norway Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. trond.dehli@unn.no.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2017 Nov 23; 25(1):112
Date
Nov-23-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Angiography
Embolization, Therapeutic
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Retrospective Studies
Spleen - injuries
Splenectomy
Trauma Centers
Treatment Outcome
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Non-operative management of splenic injuries has become the treatment of choice in hemodynamically stable patients over the last decades. The aim of the study is to describe the incidence, initial treatment and early outcome of patients with splenic injuries on a national level.
All hospitals in Norway admitting trauma patients were invited to participate in the study. The study period was January through December 2013. The hospitals delivered anonymous data on primarily admitted patients with splenic injury.
Three of the four regional trauma centers and 26 of the remaining 33 acute care hospitals delivered data on a total of 151 patients with splenic injury indicating an incidence of 4 splenic injuries per 100,000 inhabitants/year, and a median of 4 splenic injuries per hospital per year. A total of 128 (85%) patients were successfully treated non-operatively including 20 patients who underwent an angiographic procedure. The remaining 23 (15%) patients underwent open splenectomy or spleen-preserving surgery.
Most patients with splenic injuries are managed non-operatively. Despite the low number of splenic injuries per hospital, the results indicate satisfactory outcome on a national level.
Notes
Cites: J Trauma. 2011 Oct;71(4):898-903; discussion 903 PMID 21986737
Cites: J Trauma. 1989 Dec;29(12):1664-6 PMID 2593197
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016 Aug 25;24(1):105 PMID 27561336
Cites: J Trauma. 2011 Mar;70(3):569-74 PMID 21610344
Cites: J Trauma. 2006 Jul;61(1):192-8 PMID 16832270
Cites: J Trauma. 1995 Mar;38(3):323-4 PMID 7897707
Cites: Injury. 2014 May;45(5):859-63 PMID 24405973
Cites: Injury. 2014 Jan;45(1):160-3 PMID 23137799
Cites: J Trauma. 1974 Mar;14(3):187-96 PMID 4814394
Cites: J Trauma. 2007 Apr;62(4):843-52 PMID 17426538
Cites: J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2014 Jun;76(6):1354-61 PMID 24854300
Cites: J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2013 Jan;74(1):100-3; discussion 103-4 PMID 23271083
Cites: J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2013 Jan;74(1):105-11; discussion 111-2 PMID 23271084
Cites: Injury. 2005 Nov;36(11):1288-92 PMID 16122752
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Apr;81(4):427-33 PMID 20122784
Cites: Ann Surg. 2012 Jan;255(1):165-70 PMID 22156925
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Jun;64(6):1613-8 PMID 18545132
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2014 Apr;218(4):644-8 PMID 24655852
PubMed ID
29169401 View in PubMed
Less detail