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Appendiceal mass in a neonate after surgery for esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula: report of a case.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58211
Source
Surg Today. 2005;35(1):80-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Ayse Karaman
Yusuf Hakan Cavusoglu
Derya Erdogan
Ibrahim Karaman
Ozden Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Surg Today. 2005;35(1):80-1
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - diagnosis - surgery
Appendectomy - methods
Appendicitis - pathology - surgery
Esophageal Atresia - diagnosis - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Infant, Newborn
Laparotomy - methods
Risk assessment
Tracheoesophageal Fistula - diagnosis - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A 23-day-old girl presented with abdominal distension and vomiting. She had been previously operated on for esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) when she was 2 days old. An immediate laparotomy revealed an appendiceal mass caused by perforated appendicitis. The occurrence of appendicitis and an appendiceal mass is extremely rare in neonates and this may be the first such report in the world literature.
PubMed ID
15622470 View in PubMed
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Comparison of two methods for the management of appendicular mass in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29980
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2005 Feb;21(2):81-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Derya Erdogan
Ibrahim Karaman
Adnan Narci
Ayse Karaman
Y Hakan Cavusoglu
M Kemal Aslan
Ozden Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, 06080 Ankara, Turkey. deryaerdogan@hotmail.com
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2005 Feb;21(2):81-3
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Appendectomy
Appendicitis - diagnosis - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in pediatric surgery. In the presence of an appendicular mass, surgical management can be difficult. We evaluate the results of appendix mass management both with immediate operation and conservative treatment over a period of 5 years. Forty children who presented with appendicular mass over a period of 5 years were reviewed. Their mean age was 7.6+/-2.7 years, and the mean duration of symptoms was 7.8+/-2.7 days. We evaluated the children in two groups: The first group included 19 children who were operated on immediately, and the second group included 21 children who were managed conservatively, followed by elective appendectomy. In the first group, mean hospitalization time was 8.7+/-3.2 days. The complication rate was found to be high (26.3%). Ileal injury occurred in two patients, intraabdominal abscess developed in one patient, and wound infection developed in another. Appendectomy could not be done in one patient who required another laparotomy 8 weeks later. In the second group, mean hospitalization time was 8.9+/-2.6 days. Two patients (8.6%) failed to respond to conservative management. Elective appendectomy was performed after 2-3 months. Two patients returned with perforated appendicitis 5 months and 12 months later, respectively, because they were not brought back for subsequent appendectomy. It can be concluded that conservative treatment of appendicular mass is safe; we also advocate elective appendectomy because of the probable risk of recurrence.
PubMed ID
15614511 View in PubMed
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Magill forceps technique for removal of safety pins in upper esophagus: a preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30199
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2004 Sep;68(9):1189-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Ayse Karaman
Y Hakan Cavusoglu
Ibrahim Karaman
Derya Erdogan
M Kemal Aslan
Ozden Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Koyluler Sokak, 15/2 Cebeci, Ankara 06590, Turkey.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2004 Sep;68(9):1189-91
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Esophagoscopy - methods
Esophagus
Female
Foreign Bodies - surgery
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Instruments
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Foreign body ingestion is not an uncommon problem in children. Children can ingest various foreign objects. One of such objects is safety pin, which is not widely reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to consider the efficacy of Magill forceps for removal of safety pins from upper esophagus. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted for all children admitted to our hospital with safety pin ingestion from 1995 to 2003. In 58 children who had been found to ingest safety pin, the attachment site was gastrointestinal tract. In 12 of the cases, safety pins were located in the upper end of the esophagus. In seven of the children safety pin extraction was achieved by using a Magill forceps with the assistance of a laryngoscope maintaining general anesthesia with mask inhalation. RESULTS: Safety pins were successfully removed with Magill forceps without any complications in seven patients whom they were located in the upper esophagus. Upper esophageal safety pins in the other five patients were extracted with rigid esophagoscopy for they were not seen under direct laryngoscopy. There were no complications. CONCLUSIONS: This is a preliminary report, but we believe that the Magill forceps technique for the removal of safety pin in the upper end of the esophagus is safe and minimally invasive method compared to rigid esophagoscopy.
PubMed ID
15302151 View in PubMed
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Seven cases of neonatal appendicitis with a review of the English language literature of the last century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58327
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2003 Dec;19(11):707-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ayse Karaman
Yusuf Hakan Cavusoglu
Ibrahim Karaman
Ozden Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Altindag, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2003 Dec;19(11):707-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appendicitis - surgery
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Neonatal appendicitis (NA) is a very rare surgical condition. The aim of this study is to once again draw attention to this subject by collecting our cases with NA and cases of NA reported separately in English-language literature over the period from 1901 to 2000. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients admitted to our hospital, with the clinical diagnosis of NA from 1990 to 2000. A survey of the English-language literature together with our own 7 cases revealed a total of 141 cases of NA during the period of 1901-2000. 128 cases had sufficient information for analysis. The patients are grouped and discussed according to these 3 time- periods: 1901-1975, 1976-1984 and 1985-2000. The incidence, etiology, and presenting signs and symptoms of appendicitis in newborns are discussed. Despite the similar perforation rates in the 3 time- periods (73%, 70%, 82%), mortality rate in NA has decreased from 78% in the 1901-1975 period, to 33% in the 1976-1984 period, and to 28% in the 1985-2000 period. A newborn baby presenting with continuous vomiting, refusal to feed, and, showing signs of pain through irritability, restlessness, sleep disturbance, and a distended abdomen; one should strongly suspect an abdominal disorder, perhaps appendicitis.
PubMed ID
14689209 View in PubMed
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