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Expressive Language Skills in Finnish Two-Year-Old Extremely- and Very-Low-Birth-Weight Preterm Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101630
Source
Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2012;64(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Sari Kunnari
Anneli Yliherva
Leila Paavola
Outi M Peltoniemi
Author Affiliation
Logopedics, Faculty of Humanities, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2012;64(1):5-11
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective: Preterm children with low birth weight are at greater risk of experiencing speech and language difficulties than full-term children. The aim of the current study was to investigate expressive language skills of Finnish-speaking preterm children with low birth weight [extremely-low-birth-weight (ELBW) children: n = 8; very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) children: n = 10] at 2 years of corrected age and to compare their language results with full-term controls (n = 18), using spontaneous speech samples. Methods: The children were video recorded in semistructured free-play sessions with their mothers. From these video samples, expressive vocabulary size and maximum sentence length (MSL) were analyzed. In addition, the possible effect of children's gender on language measures as well as associations between different language measures were examined. Results: The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the preterm and full-term groups in the size of expressive vocabulary. In contrast, the MSL, which measures morphosyntactic skills, was significantly shorter in preterm children. A positive correlation was found between MSL and expressive vocabulary. Children's gender was not associated with language skills measured. Conclusion: The findings indicate that Finnish-speaking preterm children, especially ELBW children, experience difficulties in morphosyntactic skills.
PubMed ID
21701186 View in PubMed
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Pediatric Intensive Care in PICUs and Adult ICUs: A 2-Year Cohort Study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277019
Source
Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2016 Feb;17(2):e43-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Outi M Peltoniemi
Paula Rautiainen
Janne Kataja
Tero Ala-Kokko
Source
Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2016 Feb;17(2):e43-9
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Mortality
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Intensive Care Units, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
To investigate the association between the type of ICU and mortality for children treated at PICUs and adult ICUs.
This was a national multicenter cohort study. Data were collected from electronic critical care data management systems at 3 units and from national intensive care registries at 26 units.
We assessed the incidence of admissions, length of stay at ICUs, main diagnoses, and mortality for children at ICUs. Units were categorized as PICUs or as adult ICUs located at university hospitals or at non-academic central hospitals.
Children younger than 17 years of age treated at ICUs in Finland.
Not applicable.
There were 4,876 admissions from 2009 to 2010, and 98.9% of patients survived until unit discharge. The mean length of stay was 3.0 ± 7.4 days; 1,395 patients (35%) required mechanical ventilation at PICUs versus 167 (35%) at adult university hospital ICUs versus 79 (19%) at central hospital ICUs (p
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2016 Feb;17(2):178-8026841034
PubMed ID
26669639 View in PubMed
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Repeated antenatal corticosteroid treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135976
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Jul;90(7):719-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Outi M Peltoniemi
M Anneli Kari
Mikko Hallman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland. outi.peltoniemi@mail.suomi.net
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Jul;90(7):719-27
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Betamethasone - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Child Development - physiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - prevention & control
Prenatal Care - methods
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk assessment
Survival Rate
Abstract
To systematically review the efficacy and safety of repeated antenatal corticosteroid on neonatal morbidity, growth and later development.
MEDLINE, Cochrane database and a bibliography of identified articles were searched for English language studies. Design. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
Randomized, controlled trials studying the efficacy and safety of repeat antenatal corticosteroid treatment on neonatal morbidity and early childhood development.
Respiratory distress syndrome, intrauterine growth, neurodevelopment.
Two reviewers independently assessed titles, abstracts and full studies, extracted data and assessed quality. Meta-analyses were performed, calculating risk ratios and weighted differences of means with 95% confidence intervals using a random-effects model.
Eight trials were included. Repeated betamethasone treatment decreased the risk of respiratory distress syndrome (relative risk 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.93). Trials involving weekly or biweekly repeated betamethasone and those involving a single rescue dose decreased the risk of respiratory distress syndrome. Intrauterine growth was significantly restricted among preterm infants exposed to weekly or biweekly repeated betamethasone. A single rescue course did not affect growth. Four follow-up studies did not reveal any disturbances in neurodevelopment or growth at two years of corrected age.
Repeated corticosteroid treatment decreased the risk of respiratory distress syndrome among preterm infants. Weekly or biweekly repeated betamethasone restricted intrauterine growth, which raises concerns about long-term consequences on neurodevelopment and metabolism. More follow-up studies are needed to confirm the long-term safety of repeated betamethasone.
PubMed ID
21426310 View in PubMed
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