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Association between a Mediterranean-type diet and risk of preterm birth among Danish women: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87329
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mikkelsen Tina B
Osterdal Marie Louise
Knudsen Vibeke K
Haugen Margaretha
Meltzer Helle M
Bakketeig Leiv
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark. tbm@forskningskonsulent.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):325-30
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Humans
Maternal Nutrition Physiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Thus far, few factors with a causal relation to preterm birth have been identified. Many studies have focused on the woman's diet, but most have been discouraging. The aim of the present study was to examine if maternal intake of a Mediterranean-type diet (MD) is associated with reduced risk of preterm birth. METHODS: The Danish National Birth Cohort assessed diet in mid-pregnancy by food frequency questionnaires (FFQ). Women consuming MD were those who ate fish twice a week or more, used olive or rape seed oil, consumed 5+ fruits and vegetables a day, ate meat (other than poultry and fish) at most twice a week, and drank at most 2 cups of coffee a day. RESULTS: Of 35,530 non-smoking women, 1,137 (3.2%) fulfilled all MD criteria, and 540 (1.5%) none. Odds ratios for preterm birth and early preterm birth were 0.61 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.35-1.05) and 0.28 (0.11-0.76), respectively, in MD women compared to women fulfilling none of the MD criteria. CONCLUSION: Shifting towards a MD during pregnancy may reduce the risk of early delivery in Danish women.
PubMed ID
18307073 View in PubMed
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Associations of maternal fish intake during pregnancy and breastfeeding duration with attainment of developmental milestones in early childhood: a study from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92117
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Sep;88(3):789-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Oken Emily
Østerdal Marie Louise
Gillman Matthew W
Knudsen Vibeke K
Halldorsson Thorhallur I
Strøm Marin
Bellinger David C
Hadders-Algra Mijna
Michaelsen Kim Fleischer
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Boston, MA 02215, USA. emily_oken@0040hphc.org
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Sep;88(3):789-96
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Proteins
Female
Fishes
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mothers
Pregnancy - physiology
Prenatal Care
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the overall effect of maternal fish intake during pregnancy on child development or examined whether the developmental benefits of maternal fish intake are greater in infants breastfed for a shorter duration. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study associations of maternal prenatal fish intake and breastfeeding duration with child developmental milestones. DESIGN: We studied 25 446 children born to mothers participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort, a prospective population-based cohort study including pregnant women enrolled between 1997 and 2002. Mothers reported child development by a standardized interview, which we used to generate developmental scores at ages 6 and 18 mo. We used multivariate cumulative ordinal logistic regression to evaluate the odds of higher developmental scores associated with maternal fish intake and breastfeeding, after adjustment for child age, sex, and growth; maternal size and pregnancy characteristics; and parental education and social status. RESULTS: Higher maternal fish intake and greater duration of breastfeeding were associated with higher child developmental scores at 18 mo [odds ratio: 1.29 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.38) for the highest versus the lowest quintile of fish intake, and 1.28 (1.18, 1.38) for breastfeeding for > or =10 mo compared with breastfeeding for
PubMed ID
18779297 View in PubMed
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Data collected on maternal dietary exposures in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79063
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;21(1):76-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Olsen Sjúrdur Fródi
Mikkelsen Tina Broby
Knudsen Vibeke Kildegaard
Orozova-Bekkevold Ivanka
Halldórsson Thórhallur Ingi
Strøm Marin
Osterdal Marie Louise
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. sfo@soci.au.dk
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;21(1):76-86
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Records
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Nutrition Physiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Abstract
Recent research suggests that the diet consumed in, or shortly before, pregnancy can potentially lead to maldevelopment and diseases in the offspring, which may become apparent at any time from the embryonic stage until old age. For example, maternal diet may affect the chance of twinning (and associated complications), malformation risk, brain development, and the offspring's fecundity and risk of contracting cardiovascular diseases and cancer in adult life. Prospectively designed longitudinal studies with sufficient size and data quality are much needed to substantiate or refute these hypotheses. At present, the Danish National Birth Cohort is likely to be the largest epidemiological database containing extensive information on maternal dietary exposures. By October 2002, 100 000 women had been recruited in early pregnancy, for long-term follow-up of themselves and their offspring. The present paper details the information available in the database on early nutritional exposures with emphasis on maternal dietary intake. We also present distributions of selected nutritional exposures.
PubMed ID
17239183 View in PubMed
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Duration of pregnancy in relation to seafood intake during early and mid pregnancy: prospective cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79779
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(10):749-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Olsen Sjurdur F
Østerdal Marie Louise
Salvig Jannie Dalby
Kesmodel Ulrik
Henriksen Tine Brink
Hedegaard Morten
Secher Niels Jørgen
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark. sfo@soci.au.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(10):749-58
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimesters
Pregnancy, Prolonged - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Seafood
Abstract
We examined the association between exposure to seafood intake during two periods of pregnancy on the one hand and risks of preterm delivery and postterm delivery on the other. In a prospective cohort of 8729 pregnant Danish women, we assessed frequency of fish meals during the first and second trimester of pregnancy by questionnaires completed around gestation weeks 16 and 30, respectively. When fish intake was based solely on intake reported for the early period of pregnancy, mean gestation length was shorter by 3.91 (95% CI: 2.24-5.58) days and odds of preterm delivery were increased 2.38 (1.23-4.61) times in those who never consumed fish (n = 308) vs. those who consumed both fish as main meal and fish in sandwiches at least once per week (n = 785). These measures were similar when fish intake was based solely on intake reported for mid-pregnancy. In the subgroup of women reporting same intake in the two trimesters, those who never consumed fish (n = 165) had 8.57 (5.46-11.7) days shorter mean gestation and 19.6 (2.32-165) times increased odds of preterm delivery, compared to high fish consumers (n = 127); odds of elective and postterm delivery were reduced by a factor 0.33 (0.11-1.02) and 0.34 (0.12-0.95), respectively, in zero fish consumers. All analyses were adjusted for potential confounding by factors such as maternal smoking, height, and prepregnant weight. We conclude that never consuming fish in the first two trimesters of pregnancy was an extremely strong risk factor for preterm delivery but was also associated with reduced risks of elective delivery and postterm delivery.
PubMed ID
17111251 View in PubMed
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Mediterranean-type diet and risk of preterm birth among women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa): a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87330
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):319-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Haugen Margaretha
Meltzer Helle Margrete
Brantsaeter Anne Lise
Mikkelsen Tina
Osterdal Marie Louise
Alexander Jan
Olsen Sjurdur F
Bakketeig Leiv
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Toxicology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Nydalen, Norway. margaretha.haugen@fhi.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):319-24
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Nutrition Physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce the incidence of preterm birth. We wanted to investigate whether a Mediterranean-type diet (MD) could be associated with a lower risk of preterm birth in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). METHODS: The data collection was conducted as part of MoBa at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. In MoBa, women answer a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) at week 18-22 of pregnancy. The MD criteria were intake of fish > or =2 times a week, fruit and vegetables > or =5 times a day, use of olive/canola oil, red meat intake
PubMed ID
18307072 View in PubMed
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Validity of preeclampsia-related diagnoses recorded in a national hospital registry and in a postpartum interview of the women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77480
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jul 15;166(2):117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2007
Author
Klemmensen Ase K
Olsen Sjurdur F
Osterdal Marie Louise
Tabor Ann
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. klem@dadlnet.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jul 15;166(2):117-24
Date
Jul-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic Errors - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
International Classification of Diseases
Interviews
Postpartum Period
Pre-Eclampsia - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In a population-based sample, the authors examined the validity of preeclampsia and related diagnoses recorded in a mandatory Danish national hospital discharge registry and in a standardized telephone interview of women who gave birth between 1998 and 2002. Using a "gold standard" for preeclampsia defined in accordance with the guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the authors reviewed hospital charts of 3,039 women and found that 61 of 88 preeclampsia cases (69.3%) and 24 of 55 cases of serious subtypes of preeclampsia (43.6%) were recorded as such by the registry. A total of 21 of 2,951 women without preeclampsia (0.71%) had a preeclampsia diagnosis in the registry. All registrations of serious subtypes of preeclampsia reflected true cases. The positive predictive value of a preeclampsia diagnosis in the registry was 74.4%. Including interview data reduced the sample size to 2,307 women. In this sample, of 62 women with preeclampsia, 45 (72.6%) reported in the interview to have had preeclampsia. Of 2,245 women with no preeclampsia, 31 (1.4%) reported to have had preeclampsia. The positive predictive value of the women's own report on preeclampsia was 59.2%. The authors conclude, for the purpose of etiologic studies, that the registry had acceptable validity, whereas the usefulness of self-reported information may be limited.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jul 15;166(2):125-7; discussion 128-917556760
PubMed ID
17556761 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.