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Age, parity, history of abortion and contraceptive choices affect the risk of repeat abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155885
Source
Contraception. 2008 Aug;78(2):149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Oskari Heikinheimo
Mika Gissler
Satu Suhonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Helsinki, SF-00029 Helsinki, Finland. oskari.heikinheimo@helsinki.fi
Source
Contraception. 2008 Aug;78(2):149-54
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Therapeutic
Age Factors
Contraception Behavior
Family Planning Services
Female
Finland
Humans
Intrauterine Devices - utilization
Multivariate Analysis
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
The rate of repeat induced abortion varies from 30% to 38% in northern Europe. Thus, repeat abortion is an important public health issue. However, risk factors as regards repeat abortion are poorly understood. We characterized risk factors related to sociodemographic characteristics, history of abortion and post-abortal contraception.
A prospective cohort study of 1269 women undergoing medical abortion between August 2000 and December 2002 was conducted. The subjects were followed via the Finnish Registry of Induced Abortions until December 2005, the follow-up time (mean+/-SD) being 49.2+/-8.0 months.
Altogether, 179 (14.1%) of the subjects requested repeat abortion within the follow-up time. In univariate analysis, a history of prior abortion, being parous, young age, smoking and failure to attend the follow-up visit were associated with repeat abortion. Immediate--in contrast to postponed--initiation of any contraceptive method was linked to a lower risk of repeat abortion. In comparison with combined oral contraceptives, use of intrauterine contraception was most efficacious in reducing the risk of another pregnancy termination. In multivariate analysis, the effects of young age, being parous, smoking, a history of prior abortion and type of contraception on the risk of another abortion persisted.
An increased focus on young women, parous women and those with a history of abortion may be efficacious in decreasing repeat abortion. Contraceptive choices made at the time of abortion have an important effect on the rate of repeat abortion. Use of intrauterine contraceptives for post-abortal contraception was associated with decreased risk of repeat abortion.
PubMed ID
18672117 View in PubMed
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Associations between hormonal contraception use, sociodemographic factors and mental health: a nationwide, register-based, matched case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304468
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 10 15; 10(10):e040072
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-15-2020
Author
Elena Toffol
Anna But
Oskari Heikinheimo
Antti Latvala
Timo Partonen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine, Helsinki, Finland elena.toffol@helsinki.fi.
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 10 15; 10(10):e040072
Date
10-15-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Contraception
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hormonal Contraception
Humans
Mental health
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Young Adult
Abstract
Sociodemographic and mental health characteristics are associated with contraceptive choices. We aimed to describe the sociodemographic, reproductive and mental health characteristics of all fertile-aged women in Finland who used hormonal contraception (HC) in 2017.
A nationwide, register-based study.
All women living in Finland in 2017; data from the Care Register of Health Care, Medical Birth Register, Population Register Centre, Prescription Centre, Register of Induced Abortions.
All women aged 15-49 with one redeemed HC prescription in 2017 (n=294?356), and a same-sized, age-matched and residence-matched, control group of non-users.
Rates of HC use; associations between HC use and mental disorders, sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics.
25.8% of women aged 15-49 years used HC. Women with the lowest socioeconomic levels had lower odds of using HC than women with upper-level statuses (OR, 95%?CI students: 0.97, 0.94 to 0.99; entitled to pension: 0.66, 0.63 to 0.69; other: 0.87, 0.85 to 0.89; unknown: 0.90, 0.85 to 0.90). Women with the highest education (secondary: 1.46, 1.43 to 1.48; tertiary: 1.64, 1.58 to 1.70; academic: 1.60, 1.56 to 1.63) and income (second quarter: 1.57, 1.54 to 1.60; third quarter: 1.85, 1.82 to 1.89; fourth quarter: 2.01, 1.97 to 2.06), and unmarried women had higher odds of using HC than women with the lowest education and income levels, and married (0.61, 0.60 to 0.62), divorced (0.86, 0.84 to 0.88), widowed (0.73, 0.65 to 0.83) or other marital status women (0.26, 0.22 to 0.30).Parous women (0.70, 0.69 to 0.71), those with previous induced abortion(s) (0.91, 0.89 to 0.92) or recent eating (0.68, 0.62 to 0.75) or personality (0.89, 0.79 to 0.97) disorders had lower odds of HC use. Absolute risk differences between women with and without mental disorders ranged from 3.1% (anxiety disorders) to 10.1% (eating disorders).
A quarter of the fertile-aged women use HC in Finland. Sociodemographic disparities persist in relation to HC use, although of small effect size. HC use is less common among women suffering from severe to moderate psychiatric disorders, especially eating disorders.
PubMed ID
33060091 View in PubMed
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Associations between psychological well-being, mental health, and hormone therapy in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women: results of two population-based studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117649
Source
Menopause. 2013 Jun;20(6):667-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Elena Toffol
Oskari Heikinheimo
Timo Partonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. elena.toffol@thl.fi
Source
Menopause. 2013 Jun;20(6):667-76
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Aged
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Mental health
Middle Aged
Perimenopause - physiology - psychology
Postmenopause - physiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproductive health
Abstract
A proportion of women experience depressive and anxiety symptoms and/or disorders in connection with the menopausal transition. Estrogen-only therapy has been reported to have beneficial effects on mental health, but the effects of combined hormone therapy (HT) on mental health are less clear. We studied the associations between HT use and psychopathology in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.
Data on women who participated in the Health 2000 Survey and the National FINRISK Surveys in Finland were analyzed.
An association between current HT use and psychiatric diagnosis in the previous 12 months was found. In addition, HT use was associated with recent self-reported diagnosis of depression and with depressed mood (FINRISK), as well as with major depressive disorder and anxiety disorder (Health 2000). Associations with the following symptoms were found: nervousness, frightening thoughts, nightmares, and headache (FINRISK), feelings of depression (FINRISK and Health 2000), and unhappiness (Health 2000). No differences between different routes of administration or types of HT emerged.
Current use of HT in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women is associated with worse psychological well-being and mental health than in women not using HT. It is important to identify women in need of psychiatric support at the time of the menopausal transition.
Notes
Comment In: Climacteric. 2013 Jun;16(3):399-40023814881
PubMed ID
23277355 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk of Lichen planus: A cohort study of 13,100 women in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287201
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 Jan 01;142(1):18-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-01-2018
Author
Pia Halonen
Maija Jakobsson
Oskari Heikinheimo
Annika Riska
Mika Gissler
Eero Pukkala
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 Jan 01;142(1):18-22
Date
Jan-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lichen Planus - complications
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The association between Lichen planus (LP) and cancer has been under debate for decades. We studied the connection via population-based Finnish register data. All women with the diagnosis of LP (n?=?13,100) were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Registry from 1969-2012. These patients were linked with subsequent cancer diagnoses from the Finnish Cancer Registry until 2014. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were counted for different cancers by dividing the observed numbers of cancers by expected numbers, which were based on national cancer incidence rates. In total, 1,520 women with LP were diagnosed with cancer (SIR 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.20). LP was associated with an increased risk of cancer of lip (SIR 5.17, 95% CI 3.06-8.16), cancer of tongue (SIR 12.4, 95% CI 9.45-16.0), cancer of oral cavity (SIR 7.97, 95% CI 6.79-9.24), cancer of esophagus (SIR 1.95, 95% CI 1.17-3.04), cancer of larynx (SIR of 3.47, 95% CI 1.13-8.10) and cancer of vulva (SIR 1.99, 95% CI 1.18-3.13). The risk of cancer was not increased in other locations where LP manifests (pharynx and skin). Patients with diagnosed LP have an increased risk of developing cancer of lip, tongue, oral cavity, esophagus, larynx and vulva. These data are important when considering treatment and follow-up of patients with LP diagnosis.
PubMed ID
28857160 View in PubMed
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Can the outcome of the next pregnancy be predicted at the time of induced abortion?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153484
Source
Hum Reprod. 2009 Apr;24(4):820-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Oskari Heikinheimo
Mika Gissler
Satu Suhonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 140, SF-00029, HUS, Finland. oskari.heikinheimo@helsinki.fi
Source
Hum Reprod. 2009 Apr;24(4):820-6
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intrauterine Devices - utilization
Multivariate Analysis
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - psychology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Factors predicting the outcome of the next pregnancy following termination of pregnancy (TOP) are poorly known.
A cohort of 1269 women undergoing medical TOP between 2000 and 2002 were followed up until the next pregnancy or until the end of 2006, using registers of induced abortion, births and hospital discharges. Factors associated with repeat TOP, delivery and failed pregnancy were analysed.
During the mean (+/-SD) follow-up period of 4.2 +/- 1.5 years, 446 (35%) women had at least one subsequent pregnancy. Of these, 207 (46%) resulted in delivery, 169 (38%) in repeat TOP and 16% in failed pregnancy. In multivariate analysis, parity [hazard ratio (HR) 3.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.70-6.91] and history of TOP (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.10-2.33) were risk factors of repeat TOP. Age above 25 years (HR
PubMed ID
19109310 View in PubMed
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Clinical follow-up compared with self-assessment of outcome after medical abortion: a multicentre, non-inferiority, randomised, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258431
Source
Lancet. 2014 Oct 30;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2014
Author
Kevin Sunde Oppegaard
Erik Qvigstad
Christian Fiala
Oskari Heikinheimo
Lina Benson
Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecology, Helse Finnmark, Klinikk Hammerfest, Hammerfest, Norway. Electronic address: kevinsunde@hotmail.com.
Source
Lancet. 2014 Oct 30;
Date
Oct-30-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Medical abortion with mifepristone and prostaglandins is well established. We compared clinical assessment with self-assessment of abortion outcome.
This randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial was done in four clinics in Austria, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, between Aug 16, 2011, and Jan 31, 2013. Women aged 18 years and older who had requested medical termination of a pregnancy up to 63 days of gestation were eligible. Computer-generated block randomisation (block size ten) assigned women in a 1:1 ratio to attend routine clinical follow-up or to self-assess outcome at home with a semiquantitative urine human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test 1-3 weeks after abortion. The primary outcome was the percentage of women with complete abortion not requiring further medical or surgical intervention within 3 months. Analysis was per protocol and by intention to treat. The non-inferiority margin was five percentage points. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01487213.
924 women were assigned routine follow-up (n=466) or self-assessment (n=458) and included in the intention-to-treat analysis. 901 were included in the per-protocol analysis (n=446 and n=455, respectively). Complete abortion was reported in 432 (95%) of 455 in the routine follow-up group and 419 (94%) of 446 women in the self-assessment group (crude difference -1·0, 95% CI -4·0 to 2·0). 20 (4%) women in the routine follow-up group and 17 (4%) in the self-assessment group required surgery. No women in the routine follow-up group versus three in the self-assessment group had undetected continuing pregnancies. Eight (1·8%) and one (0·2%) women, respectively, had infections (p=0·038).
Self-assessment was non-inferior to routine follow-up and could save resources.
Nordic Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, European Society of Contraception, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helse Finnmark, Swedish Research Council, and Stockholm County Council and Karolinska University Hospital.
PubMed ID
25468164 View in PubMed
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A cohort study of 49 933 women with surgically verified endometriosis: Increased incidence of breast cancer below the age of 40.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310648
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2019 09; 98(9):1113-1119
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2019
Author
Liisu Saavalainen
Heini Lassus
Anna But
Aila Tiitinen
Päivi Härkki
Mika Gissler
Eero Pukkala
Oskari Heikinheimo
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2019 09; 98(9):1113-1119
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Endometriosis - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - surgery
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - surgery
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
The association between endometriosis and breast cancer is unclear. We assessed the risk of breast cancer in women with surgically verified endometriosis, with special focus on the age at cancer diagnosis, time from endometriosis diagnosis and breast cancer histology.
All women with first endometriosis-associated diagnoses occurring concomitantly with relevant surgical codes during 1987-2012 were retrieved from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register in Finland. Breast cancers diagnosed after the endometriosis diagnosis were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry. The Finnish female population served as the reference. The endometriosis cohort consisted of 49 933 women (23 210 cases of ovarian, 20 187 peritoneal and 2372 deep infiltrating endometriosis). The outcome measure was the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of breast cancer calculated for the whole cohort and for the subtypes of endometriosis, stratified by the age at breast cancer diagnosis, histology and time from endometriosis diagnosis.
The overall risk of breast cancer (1555 cases) was similar to the reference population (SIR 0.99; 95% CI 0.94-1.03), did not differ in types of endometriosis, and was similar for ductal and lobular breast cancer. However, the SIR of breast cancer was increased in the age group of 20-29 years (SIR 4.44; 95% CI 2.22-7.94) and in the age group of 30-39 years (SIR 1.28; 95% CI 1.03-1.57). The risk of in situ breast cancer (170 cases) was increased in the entire endometriosis cohort (SIR 1.25; 95% CI 1.07-1.44).
The overall risk of breast cancer in women with surgically verified endometriosis was similar to that of general population. However, the risk of breast cancer at young age was increased. Young women with surgically verified endometriosis represent highly symptomatic patients with more frequent surgeries and additional therapies that might also contribute to the risk of breast cancer.
PubMed ID
30883685 View in PubMed
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Comparison of rates of adverse events in adolescent and adult women undergoing medical abortion: population register based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135125
Source
BMJ. 2011;342:d2111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Maarit Niinimäki
Satu Suhonen
Maarit Mentula
Elina Hemminki
Oskari Heikinheimo
Mika Gissler
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 2011;342:d2111
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - adverse effects
Abortifacient Agents, Steroidal - adverse effects
Abortion, Incomplete - epidemiology
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Mifepristone - adverse effects
Misoprostol - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the risks of short term adverse events in adolescent and older women undergoing medical abortion.
Population based retrospective cohort study.
Finnish abortion register 2000-6.
All women (n = 27,030) undergoing medical abortion during 2000-6, with only the first induced abortion analysed for each woman.
Incidence of adverse events (haemorrhage, infection, incomplete abortion, surgical evacuation, psychiatric morbidity, injury, thromboembolic disease, and death) among adolescent (
Notes
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Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(1):CD00671418254113
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Cites: Reprod Health Matters. 2008 May;16(31 Suppl):162-7218772097
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Apr;113(4):845-5219305329
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Jul 9;361(2):145-5119587339
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Mar;115(3):660; author reply 660-120177301
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Comment In: Evid Based Med. 2012 Feb;17(1):30-121727240
Comment In: BMJ. 2011;342:d319721610061
Comment In: BMJ. 2011;342:d218521508043
PubMed ID
21508042 View in PubMed
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Complications and long-term follow-up on colorectal resections in the treatment of deep infiltrating endometriosis extending to bowel wall.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260634
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Jan;94(1):72-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Satu Tarjanne
Oskari Heikinheimo
Maarit Mentula
Päivi Härkki
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Jan;94(1):72-9
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Colectomy - adverse effects - methods
Colonic Diseases - complications - pathology - surgery
Endometriosis - complications - pathology - surgery
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility, Female - etiology - physiopathology
Laparoscopy - adverse effects - methods
Laparotomy - adverse effects - methods
Linear Models
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - surgery
Rectal Diseases - complications - pathology - surgery
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Tertiary Care Centers
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the rate of complications, factors associated with complications and long-term results in colorectal resections for the treatment of deep infiltrating endometriosis of the bowel wall.
Retrospective study.
Tertiary center in Finland.
Medical charts were reviewed for 164 women undergoing colorectal resections for deep infiltrating endometriosis between June 2004 and December 2012 at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital; in 112 women (68%) bowel resection was performed laparoscopically and in 52 women (32%) laparotomy was needed.
Complications, re-operations, fertility.
The rate of major complications was 12% for both laparoscopies and laparotomies. However, the rate of complications during laparoscopies decreased from 27% in 2004-06 to 8% between 2010 and 2012. Similarly, the complication rate in laparoscopies fell with increased personal experience of the operating surgeon. A greater size (=4 cm) of the nodules in the resected bowel was significantly associated with the development of a major complication. During the median follow up of 61 months (range 16-116 months) 7% needed a re-operation due to recurrence. Forty-seven percent of those women who preoperatively desired a pregnancy, subsequently had a child.
Laparoscopy has become a feasible alternative to laparotomy for performing colorectal resection in cases of deep infiltrating endometriosis of the bowel wall. Moreover, colorectal resections seem to result in good long-term pain relief and fertility. With increasing experience the number of complications was reduced and therefore, the practice of centralizing these operations seems to be well justified.
PubMed ID
25256374 View in PubMed
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Determinants of underage induced abortion--the 1987 Finnish Birth Cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275544
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016 May;95(5):572-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Suvi Leppälahti
Oskari Heikinheimo
Reija Paananen
Päivi Santalahti
Marko Merikukka
Mika Gissler
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016 May;95(5):572-9
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Foster Home Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mental Disorders - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Parturition
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although underage pregnancies often end in induced abortion, data on girls who undergo termination of pregnancy are lacking. Our aim was to identify determinants of underage induced abortion and compare them with those of childbirth.
All girls born in 1987 in Finland surviving the perinatal period (n = 29 041) were included in the study and divided into three study groups: Girls undergoing induced abortion (n = 1041, 3.6%) or childbirth (n = 395, 1.4%) at
PubMed ID
26915819 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.