Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Association of common variants of UCP2 gene with low-grade inflammation in Swedish children and adolescents; the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95214
Source
Pediatr Res. 2009 Sep;66(3):350-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Labayen Idoia
Ortega Francisco B
Sjöström Michael
Nilsson Torbjörn K
Olsson Lovisa A
Ruiz Jonatan R
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria 01006, Spain. idoia.labayen@ehu.es
Source
Pediatr Res. 2009 Sep;66(3):350-4
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Biological Markers - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Child
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Inflammation - genetics
Ion Channels - genetics
Male
Mitochondrial Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
We examined the associations of two functional variants 866G>A and DEL/INS polymorphisms of UCP2 gene with low-grade inflammatory proteins (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, complement C3 [C3], and complement C4 [C4]) in 131 children (52.7% boys, aged 9.5 +/- 0.4 y) and 118 adolescents (44.1% males, aged 15.5 +/- 0.4 y) selected from the European Youth Heart Study. Differences in inflammatory markers among the genotype variants of the two UCP2 gene polymorphisms were analyzed after adjusting for sex, age, pubertal stage, fitness, and fatness. The results showed that fibrinogen, C3, and C4 were higher in GG carriers than in subjects carrying the A allele of the 866G>A polymorphism of the UCP2 gene (UCP2 -866G>A) polymorphism (all p A in modifying low-grade inflammatory state in apparently healthy children and adolescents. Given the implication of complement factors on atherosclerosis process, these results contribute to explain the reduced cardiovascular risk associated with the A allele of the UCP2 -866G>A polymorphism.
PubMed ID
19531977 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body fat is associated with blood pressure in school-aged girls with low cardiorespiratory fitness: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84901
Source
J Hypertens. 2007 Oct;25(10):2027-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Ruiz Jonatan R
Ortega Francisco B
Loit Helle M
Veidebaum Toomas
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. ruizj@ugr.es
Source
J Hypertens. 2007 Oct;25(10):2027-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adiposity - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia
Europe
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between anthropometric measurements of total and central adiposity and blood pressure in school-aged children, and to study whether these associations are modified by the levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. METHODS: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, weight, height, skinfold thickness and waist circumference were measured in 873 children aged 9-10 years participating in the Estonian and Swedish part of the European Youth Heart Study. Mean arterial pressure was calculated. Body mass index and skinfold thickness were used as markers of total adiposity, whereas waist circumference and waist-height ratio were used as markers of central adiposity. Cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated by a maximal ergometer bike test, and dichotomized into low and high levels. RESULTS: Markers of total and central adiposity were positively associated with blood pressure. The results from the regression models showed that the markers of total and central adiposity were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure in girls with low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. Similar results were observed when mean arterial pressure was the outcome variable. None of the markers of total and central adiposity were significantly associated with blood pressure in girls with high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness or in boys with low or high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. CONCLUSIONS: The results show a positive influence of simple anthropometric measurements of total and central adiposity on blood pressure, and suggest that higher cardiorespiratory fitness may attenuate the association between body fat and blood pressure in school-aged children.
PubMed ID
17885544 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular fitness in adolescents: the influence of sexual maturation status-the AVENA and EYHS studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85224
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Nov-Dec;19(6):801-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ortega Francisco B
Ruiz Jonatan R
Mesa Jose L
Gutiérrez Angel
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, 14157 Huddinge, Sweden. ortegaf@ugr.es
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Nov-Dec;19(6):801-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutrition Physiology
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body Weight
Cardiovascular System
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sexual Maturation - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
The purposes were: (1) to determine the influence of sexual maturation status and body composition by comparing cardiovascular fitness (CVF) level in two adolescent populations from the south and the north of Europe; (2) to describe the associations between CVF and sexual maturation status in adolescence. A total of 1,867 Spanish adolescents from the AVENA study and 472 from the Swedish part of the EYHS were selected for this report (aged 14-16 years). CVF (expressed by the maximal oxygen consumption) was estimated from 20 m shuttle run test in the AVENA study and from a maximal ergometer cycle test in the EYHS. Sexual maturation status was classified according to Tanner stages. Body fat percentage (BF%) was estimated from skinfold thicknesses. Expressing CVF in different ways (in absolute value and in relation to weight or fat free mass; FFM) resulted in two different results with regard to CVF interpretation and comparison between the study populations. A higher CVF, as expressed in relation to FFM, was observed in the Spanish when compared to Swedish adolescents (P = 0.001). However, after adjusting for both sexual maturation status and BF%, the difference disappeared in males, while it remained significant in females (P = 0.001). CVF was negatively associated with sexual maturation status in males (P = 0.001). However, after adjusting for BF%, the association disappeared in males, while it was significant in females (P = 0.05). These results suggest that for CVF comparisons and interpretation in adolescent populations, sexual maturation status and BF%, as well as the way to express the CVF, should be taken into account.
PubMed ID
17712790 View in PubMed
Less detail

Central adiposity in 9- and 15-year-old Swedish children from the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92825
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(4):212-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Ortega Francisco B
Ruiz Jonatan R
Vicente-Rodríguez German
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. ortegaf@ugr.es
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(4):212-6
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adiposity - physiology
Adolescent
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide percentile values for several indices of central adiposity in 9- and 15-year-old Swedish children from the European Youth Heart Study (N=1,075). Age- and sex-specific percentiles for waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-height ratio and waist-to-hip ratio were provided. No significant differences were found in the proportion of individuals with a high waist-to-height ratio (using the 0.500 cut-off) between age or sex groups. The percentile values for waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio provided in this paper, together with data from other cohorts, could help to establish international criteria for defining central obesity. For comparative purposes, future studies reporting reference data for waist circumference and/or waist-to-height ratio, should also report age- and sex-specific height values. More studies involving children of different ages and from different regions in Scandinavia are needed.
PubMed ID
18608639 View in PubMed
Less detail

High cardiovascular fitness is associated with low metabolic risk score in children: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78700
Source
Pediatr Res. 2007 Mar;61(3):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Ruiz Jonatan R
Ortega Francisco B
Rizzo Nico S
Villa Inga
Hurtig-Wennlöf Anita
Oja Leila
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, 14157, Sweden. ruizj@ugr.es
Source
Pediatr Res. 2007 Mar;61(3):350-5
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Cardiovascular physiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - etiology - physiopathology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the associations of cardiovascular fitness (CVF) with a clustering of metabolic risk factors in children, and to examine whether there is a CVF level associated with a low metabolic risk. CVF was estimated by a maximal ergometer bike test on 873 randomly selected children from Sweden and Estonia. Additional measured outcomes included fasting insulin, glucose, triglycerides, HDLC, blood pressure, and the sum of five skinfolds. A metabolic risk score was computed as the mean of the standardized outcomes scores. A risk score
PubMed ID
17314696 View in PubMed
Less detail

Relationship of physical activity, fitness, and fatness with clustered metabolic risk in children and adolescents: the European youth heart study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78301
Source
J Pediatr. 2007 Apr;150(4):388-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Rizzo Nico S
Ruiz Jonatan R
Hurtig-Wennlöf Anita
Ortega Francisco B
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
J Pediatr. 2007 Apr;150(4):388-94
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology
Motor Activity
Obesity - epidemiology
Physical Fitness
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations of physical activity (PA) at different levels and intensities and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) with a clustering of metabolic risk factors in children and adolescents with special consideration of body fat. STUDY DESIGN: Total PA and intensity levels were measured by accelerometry in children (9 years, n = 273) and adolescents (15 years, n = 256). CRF was measured with a maximal ergometer bike test. Measured outcomes included fasting insulin, glucose, triglycerides, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and body fat. A metabolic risk score (MRS) was computed as the mean of the standardized outcome scores. A "non-obesity-MRS" was computed omitting body fat from the MRS. Analysis of variance and multiple regressions were used in the analysis. RESULTS: Total and vigorous PA was inversely significantly associated with MRS in adolescent girls, the group with lowest PA, becoming insignificant when CRF was introduced in the analysis. Significant regression coefficients of total PA and CRF on non-obesity-MRS diminished when body fat was entered in the analysis. CONCLUSIONS: CRF is more strongly correlated to metabolic risk than total PA, whereas body fat appears to have a pivotal role in the association of CRF with metabolic risk.
PubMed ID
17382116 View in PubMed
Less detail

Relations of total physical activity and intensity to fitness and fatness in children: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81164
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):299-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Ruiz Jonatan R
Rizzo Nico S
Hurtig-Wennlöf Anita
Ortega Francisco B
Wärnberg Julia
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):299-303
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Body Composition - physiology
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - metabolism
Physical Fitness - physiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Skinfold thickness
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is unclear how the amount and intensity of physical activity (PA) are associated with cardiovascular fitness (CVF) and body fatness in children. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the associations of total PA and intensity levels to CVF and fatness in children. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study of 780 children aged 9-10 y from Sweden and Estonia was conducted. PA was measured by accelerometry and was expressed as min/d of total PA, moderate PA, and vigorous PA. CVF was measured with a maximal ergometer bike test and was expressed as W/kg. Body fat was derived from the sum of 5 skinfold-thickness measurements. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the degree to which variance in CVF and body fat was explained by PA, after control for age, sex, and study location. RESULTS: Lower body fat was significantly associated with higher levels of vigorous PA, but not with moderate or total PA. Those children who engaged in >40 min vigorous PA/d had lower body fat than did those who engaged in 10-18 min vigorous PA/d. Total PA, moderate PA, and vigorous PA were positively associated with CVF. Those children who engaged in >40 min vigorous PA/d had higher CVF than did those who accumulated
PubMed ID
16895875 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.