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Association between a Mediterranean-type diet and risk of preterm birth among Danish women: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87329
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mikkelsen Tina B
Osterdal Marie Louise
Knudsen Vibeke K
Haugen Margaretha
Meltzer Helle M
Bakketeig Leiv
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark. tbm@forskningskonsulent.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):325-30
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Humans
Maternal Nutrition Physiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Thus far, few factors with a causal relation to preterm birth have been identified. Many studies have focused on the woman's diet, but most have been discouraging. The aim of the present study was to examine if maternal intake of a Mediterranean-type diet (MD) is associated with reduced risk of preterm birth. METHODS: The Danish National Birth Cohort assessed diet in mid-pregnancy by food frequency questionnaires (FFQ). Women consuming MD were those who ate fish twice a week or more, used olive or rape seed oil, consumed 5+ fruits and vegetables a day, ate meat (other than poultry and fish) at most twice a week, and drank at most 2 cups of coffee a day. RESULTS: Of 35,530 non-smoking women, 1,137 (3.2%) fulfilled all MD criteria, and 540 (1.5%) none. Odds ratios for preterm birth and early preterm birth were 0.61 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.35-1.05) and 0.28 (0.11-0.76), respectively, in MD women compared to women fulfilling none of the MD criteria. CONCLUSION: Shifting towards a MD during pregnancy may reduce the risk of early delivery in Danish women.
PubMed ID
18307073 View in PubMed
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Association between fruit and vegetable consumption and birth weight: a prospective study among 43,585 Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79617
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):616-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Mikkelsen Tina B
Osler Merete
Orozova-Bekkevold Ivanka
Knudsen Vibeke K
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. tbs@ssi.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):616-22
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether fruit and vegetable consumption in pregnancy is associated with birth weight in a Western population. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study based on telephone interviews, a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and extractions of birth characteristics from national health registries. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: The 43,585 Danish women from the Danish National Birth Cohort who had completed the FFQ in mid-pregnancy and on whom information about birth outcome was available. The exposures were frequency of green leafy vegetable (GLV) intake and quantified intake of fruit, fruit and vegetables, and fruit and vegetables and juice. The outcomes were birth weight and z-score for expected birth weight adjusted for sex and gestation week. Information on maternal height, weight, smoking, and other potential confounders was obtained through telephone interviews. RESULTS: Significant associations were found for all exposures to fruit and vegetable intake with birth weight and most with z-score. The strongest association was found for fruit intake in which case birth weight increased by 10.7 g (95% CI 7.3-14.2) per quintile. All associations were stronger among lean women (BMI
PubMed ID
17132595 View in PubMed
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Association of periconceptional multivitamin use with reduced risk of preeclampsia among normal-weight women in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89309
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Jun 1;169(11):1304-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2009
Author
Catov Janet M
Nohr Ellen A
Bodnar Lisa M
Knudson Vibeke K
Olsen Sjurdur F
Olsen Jorn
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. catovjm@upmc.edu
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Jun 1;169(11):1304-11
Date
Jun-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Body Weight
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Preconception Care
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
The timing and frequency of periconceptional multivitamin use may be related to the risk of preeclampsia. Women in the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003) reported multivitamin or folate-only supplement use during a 12-week periconceptional period (from 4 weeks prior to 8 weeks after the last menstrual period). Preeclampsia cases were identified by using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes. Cox regression was used to estimate the association of frequency (weeks of use) and timing (preconception and postconception) of use with preeclampsia risk. Overall, there were 668 cases of preeclampsia (2.3%), and 18,551 women (65%) reported periconceptional multivitamin use. After adjustment, regular use (12 of 12 weeks) was related to a reduced risk of preeclampsia among normal-weight women. Compared with nonusers with a body mass index of 22 kg/m(2), regular multivitamin users with the same body mass index had a 20% reduced risk of preeclampisa (hazard ratio = 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.60, 0.99). In addition, regular use in the postconception period only was associated with reduced risk, a relation that also appeared to be limited to women with a body mass index of
PubMed ID
19372217 View in PubMed
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Associations of maternal fish intake during pregnancy and breastfeeding duration with attainment of developmental milestones in early childhood: a study from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92117
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Sep;88(3):789-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Oken Emily
Østerdal Marie Louise
Gillman Matthew W
Knudsen Vibeke K
Halldorsson Thorhallur I
Strøm Marin
Bellinger David C
Hadders-Algra Mijna
Michaelsen Kim Fleischer
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Boston, MA 02215, USA. emily_oken@0040hphc.org
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Sep;88(3):789-96
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Proteins
Female
Fishes
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mothers
Pregnancy - physiology
Prenatal Care
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the overall effect of maternal fish intake during pregnancy on child development or examined whether the developmental benefits of maternal fish intake are greater in infants breastfed for a shorter duration. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study associations of maternal prenatal fish intake and breastfeeding duration with child developmental milestones. DESIGN: We studied 25 446 children born to mothers participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort, a prospective population-based cohort study including pregnant women enrolled between 1997 and 2002. Mothers reported child development by a standardized interview, which we used to generate developmental scores at ages 6 and 18 mo. We used multivariate cumulative ordinal logistic regression to evaluate the odds of higher developmental scores associated with maternal fish intake and breastfeeding, after adjustment for child age, sex, and growth; maternal size and pregnancy characteristics; and parental education and social status. RESULTS: Higher maternal fish intake and greater duration of breastfeeding were associated with higher child developmental scores at 18 mo [odds ratio: 1.29 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.38) for the highest versus the lowest quintile of fish intake, and 1.28 (1.18, 1.38) for breastfeeding for > or =10 mo compared with breastfeeding for
PubMed ID
18779297 View in PubMed
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Dietary predictors of perfluorinated chemicals: a study from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90146
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Dec 1;42(23):8971-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2008
Author
Halldorsson Thorhallur I
Fei Chunyuan
Olsen Jørn
Lipworth Loren
McLaughlin Joseph K
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Arillerivej 5, building 305, 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark. lur@ssi.dk
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Dec 1;42(23):8971-7
Date
Dec-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet
Feeding Behavior
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Meat
Octanoic Acids - blood
Parturition
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
This study investigated the association between dietary variables and plasma levels of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) among 1076 pregnant women. Diet was assessed at midpregnancy by a food-frequency questionnaire. Mean first trimester plasma PFOS and PFOA levels were 35.1 and 5.6 ng/mL respectively. PFOS levels were positively associated (p or =75th percentile) vegetable intake and women reporting low vegetable and high red meat intake resulted in differences in plasma PFOS and PFOA concentrations equal to 31% and 18% of mean levels, respectively. Studies quantifying levels of perfluorinated compounds in food have suggested that diet could be an important route of human exposure. The observed associations in our study between dietary variables and maternal exposure further support that conclusion.
PubMed ID
19192827 View in PubMed
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Duration of pregnancy in relation to seafood intake during early and mid pregnancy: prospective cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79779
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(10):749-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Olsen Sjurdur F
Østerdal Marie Louise
Salvig Jannie Dalby
Kesmodel Ulrik
Henriksen Tine Brink
Hedegaard Morten
Secher Niels Jørgen
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark. sfo@soci.au.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(10):749-58
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimesters
Pregnancy, Prolonged - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Seafood
Abstract
We examined the association between exposure to seafood intake during two periods of pregnancy on the one hand and risks of preterm delivery and postterm delivery on the other. In a prospective cohort of 8729 pregnant Danish women, we assessed frequency of fish meals during the first and second trimester of pregnancy by questionnaires completed around gestation weeks 16 and 30, respectively. When fish intake was based solely on intake reported for the early period of pregnancy, mean gestation length was shorter by 3.91 (95% CI: 2.24-5.58) days and odds of preterm delivery were increased 2.38 (1.23-4.61) times in those who never consumed fish (n = 308) vs. those who consumed both fish as main meal and fish in sandwiches at least once per week (n = 785). These measures were similar when fish intake was based solely on intake reported for mid-pregnancy. In the subgroup of women reporting same intake in the two trimesters, those who never consumed fish (n = 165) had 8.57 (5.46-11.7) days shorter mean gestation and 19.6 (2.32-165) times increased odds of preterm delivery, compared to high fish consumers (n = 127); odds of elective and postterm delivery were reduced by a factor 0.33 (0.11-1.02) and 0.34 (0.12-0.95), respectively, in zero fish consumers. All analyses were adjusted for potential confounding by factors such as maternal smoking, height, and prepregnant weight. We conclude that never consuming fish in the first two trimesters of pregnancy was an extremely strong risk factor for preterm delivery but was also associated with reduced risks of elective delivery and postterm delivery.
PubMed ID
17111251 View in PubMed
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Fatty acid composition of human milk in atopic Danish mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81529
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jul;84(1):190-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Lauritzen Lotte
Halkjaer Liselotte Brydensholt
Mikkelsen Tina B
Olsen Sjurdur F
Michaelsen Kim F
Loland Lotte
Bisgaard Hans
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Center for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark. ll@kvl.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jul;84(1):190-6
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dermatitis, Atopic - metabolism
Diet
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - analysis
Fatty Acids, Omega-6 - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis - metabolism
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lactation - metabolism
Milk, human - chemistry
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis has been related to a disturbed metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). OBJECTIVE: We tested whether the PUFA composition of breast milk differs significantly between mothers with atopic dermatitis, mothers with other types of atopy, and nonatopic mothers. We also investigated whether differences in diet can explain possible observed differences. DESIGN: Mothers with current or previous asthma (n = 396) were divided into 3 groups according to history of atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis. Breast-milk samples were collected from 314 women approximately 3 wk after delivery. The habitual diet of the women was assessed with food-frequency questionnaires in the 25th week of gestation (n = 207). Breast-milk samples and simultaneous dietary data from 14 nonatopic mothers were used for comparison. RESULTS: Compared with the milk of nonatopic mothers, that of atopic mothers had significantly higher concentrations of 22:5n-6 and lower concentrations of 20:5n-3; moreover, 20:4n-6/20:5n-3, 22:5n-6/22:6n-3, and long-chain n-3 PUFA/18:3n-3 were shifted toward n-6 PUFA and 18:3n-3 in nonatopic and atopic mothers, respectively. No differences in breast-milk PUFA composition were evident between the subject groups. The diets of the groups differed only slightly with respect to protein intake. However, the PUFA composition of the breast milk was associated with diet and time of milk sampling, and the above difference in milk PUFAs disappeared when those factors were taken into account. CONCLUSION: Our data do not support the possibility that the fatty acid composition of breast milk is affected by atopic dermatitis or atopy in general, because most differences in breast-milk PUFA composition appear to be explained by the diet.
PubMed ID
16825695 View in PubMed
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Fish and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intakes during pregnancy and risk of postpartum depression: a prospective study based on a large national birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88916
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jul;90(1):149-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Strøm Marin
Mortensen Erik L
Halldorsson Thorhallur I
Thorsdottir Inga
Olsen Sjúrdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mrm@ssi.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jul;90(1):149-55
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Female
Fishes
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Maternal Age
Meat
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Social Support
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mothers may be reluctant to receive medical treatment of postpartum depression (PPD), despite the detrimental consequences the disorder can impose on mother and child. Research on alternative methods of prevention and treatment of PPD is warranted. Previous studies have suggested that long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might have a beneficial effect on depression. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore the association between intake of fish and n-3 PUFAs during pregnancy and PPD in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). DESIGN: Exposure information from the DNBC was linked to the Danish patient and prescription registries for data on clinically identified cases of depression up to 1 y postpartum. Intake of fish and n-3 PUFAs was assessed in midpregnancy with a food-frequency questionnaire. Admission to the hospital for PPD (PPD-admission) and prescription of antidepressants (PPD-prescription) were treated as separate outcomes. A total of 54,202 women were included in the present study sample. RESULTS: Rates of depression were 0.3% (PPD-admission) and 1.6% (PPD-prescription). No association was observed between fish intake and risk of PPD-admission [crude odds ratio of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.52, 1.97) and adjusted odds ratio of 0.82 (95% CI: 0.42, 1.64)], whereas a higher risk of PPD-prescription was found for the lowest compared with the highest fish intake group [crude odds ratio of 1.61 (95% CI: 1.26, 2.06) and adjusted odds ratio of 1.46 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.90)]. No association was observed with respect to n-3 PUFA intake. CONCLUSION: Overall, our data from a large prospective cohort linked with high-quality registers showed little evidence to support an association between intake of fish or n-3 PUFAs and PPD.
PubMed ID
19474139 View in PubMed
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Folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects: the Danish experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92465
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2008 Jun;29(2 Suppl):S205-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Olsen Sjurdur F
Knudsen Vibeke Kildegaard
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Division of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. sfolsen@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2008 Jun;29(2 Suppl):S205-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Educational Status
Family Planning Services
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Folic Acid Deficiency - prevention & control - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Neural Tube Defects - prevention & control - psychology
Nutrition Policy
Preconception Care - standards
Program Evaluation
Risk factors
Abstract
Evidence from controlled trials suggests that ingestion of 0.4 mg of folic acid per day in the periconceptional period is effective in preventing neural tube defects (NTD). For this reason, most countries recommend that women planning pregnancy take folic acid supplements in the periconceptional period, and some countries even fortify stable foods with folic acid. Denmark exemplifies a country with a relatively conservative attitude with respect to taking action in these matters. In 1999, a national information campaign was launched that recommended women planning pregnancy take 0.4 mg of folic acid periconceptionally, but with the moderation that women who eat a healthy diet do not need to take folic acid supplement. The campaign was repeated during 2001. The results of the latter campaign were evaluated by using data from a national survey among pregnant women conducted simultaneously with the campaign by the Danish National Birth Cohort. An increase in the proportion of folic acid users took place concomitantly with the launching of the information events, but the increase was limited. Among women who did not plan their pregnancy, a small proportion had taken folic acid supplements periconceptionally, and this proportion did not change concomitantly with the campaign. Young age and low education were factors associated with low likelihood of taking folic acid. It seems that different and more efficient actions are needed if a more substantial proportion of Danish women and their fetuses are going to benefit from the knowledge that folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period can prevent NTD.
PubMed ID
18709894 View in PubMed
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Iron supplement use among Danish pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85024
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Oct;10(10):1104-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Knudsen Vibeke K
Hansen Harald S
Ovesen Lars
Mikkelsen Tina B
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen, S, Denmark. vik@ssi.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Oct;10(10):1104-10
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet
Diet Surveys
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Iron - administration & dosage
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate compliance with the national recommendation on supplemental iron to all pregnant women in Denmark and to explore differences between compliers and non-compliers with respect to dietary habits and other lifestyle factors. DESIGN: Intake of supplemental iron from pure iron supplements and from multivitamin and mineral preparations was estimated in mid-pregnancy. SETTING: Nationwide cohort study, the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), comprising more than 100,000 women recruited in early pregnancy. SUBJECTS: Information on diet and dietary supplements was available for 54,371 women. Of these, information on lifestyle factors was available for 50,902 women. RESULTS: A high compliance with the recommendation was found, as approximately 77% of the women reported use of iron supplements during pregnancy. However, many of the compliers did not obtain the recommended doses of iron, which can partly be explained by the lack of iron preparations of appropriate doses available on the Danish market. Compliance with the recommendation was associated with age above 20 years, primiparity, body mass index
PubMed ID
17381932 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.