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Alcohol expectancy and hazardous drinking: a 6-year longitudinal and nationwide study of medical doctors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99472
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2010;16(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kjersti S Grotmol
Per Vaglum
Øivind Ekeberg
Tore Gude
Olaf G Aasland
Reidar Tyssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioral Sciences in Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. k.s.grotmol@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2010;16(1):17-22
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Physicians - trends
Abstract
AIM: The study's aim was to determine whether medical doctors' expectancy that alcohol use reduces tension predicts the extent of their hazardous drinking and whether this effect is mediated by drinking to cope. METHODS: A group of Norwegian medical doctors' (n = 288) alcohol use was followed for 6 years. The expectancy that alcohol reduces tension and the use of alcohol to cope with tension were measured 3.5 years after graduation (T1), and hazardous drinking was evaluated at T1 and 9.5 years after graduation (T2). RESULTS: At T1, 15% of men and 3% of women reported hazardous drinking. At T2, these proportions were 16 and 2%, respectively. Men reported a higher expectancy than women that alcohol reduces tension (p = 0.03), whereas there was no sex difference in drinking to cope. Adjusted predictors of hazardous drinking at T2 were male sex (p
PubMed ID
19887805 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, psychoactive substances and non-fatal road traffic accidents--a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121060
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:734
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Stig Tore Bogstrand
Hallvard Gjerde
Per Trygve Normann
Ingeborg Rossow
Øivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Emergency Department, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo N-0407, Norway. StigTore.Bogstrand@fhi.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:734
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The prevalence of alcohol and other psychoactive substances is high in biological specimens from injured drivers, while the prevalence of these psychoactive substances in samples from drivers in normal traffic is low. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of alcohol and psychoactive substances in drivers admitted to hospital for treatment of injuries after road traffic accidents with that in drivers in normal traffic, and calculate risk estimates for the substances, and combinations of substances found in both groups.
Injured drivers were recruited in the hospital emergency department and drivers in normal conditions were taken from the hospital catchment area in roadside tests of moving traffic. Substances found in blood samples from injured drivers and oral fluid samples from drivers in moving traffic were compared using equivalent cut off concentrations, and risk estimates were calculated using logistic regression analyses.
In 21.9% of the injured drivers, substances were found: most commonly alcohol (11.5%) and stimulants eg. cocaine or amphetamines (9.4%). This compares to 3.2% of drivers in normal traffic where the most commonly found substances were z-hypnotics (0.9%) and benzodiazepines (0.8%). The greatest increase in risk of being injured was for alcohol combined with any other substance (OR: 231.9, 95% CI: 33.3- 1615.4, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22943663 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, depression and relationship satisfaction in the pregnancy following stillbirth and after the birth of a live-born baby: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294808
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-24-2018
Author
Ida Kathrine Gravensteen
Eva-Marie Jacobsen
Per Morten Sandset
Linda Bjørk Helgadottir
Ingela Rådestad
Leiv Sandvik
Øivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O box 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. ida.gravensteen@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Date
01-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Birth Intervals - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Live Birth - psychology
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sexual Partners - psychology
Stillbirth - psychology
Abstract
Experiencing a stillbirth can be a potent stressor for psychological distress in the subsequent pregnancy and possibly after the subsequent birth. The impact on women's relationship with her partner in the subsequent pregnancy and postpartum remains uncertain. The objectives of the study were 1) To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in the pregnancy following stillbirth and assess gestational age at stillbirth and inter-pregnancy interval as individual risk factors. 2) To assess the course of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with partner relationship up to 3 years after the birth of a live-born baby following stillbirth.
This study is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a population-based pregnancy cohort. The sample included 901 pregnant women: 174 pregnant after a stillbirth, 362 pregnant after a live birth and 365 previously nulliparous. Anxiety and depression were assessed by short-form subscales of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist, and relationship satisfaction was assessed by the Relationship Satisfaction Scale. These outcomes were measured in the third trimester of pregnancy and 6, 18 and 36 months postpartum. Logistic regression models were applied to study the impact of previous stillbirth on depression and anxiety in the third trimester of the subsequent pregnancy and to investigate gestational age and inter-pregnancy interval as potential risk factors.
Women pregnant after stillbirth had a higher prevalence of anxiety (22.5%) and depression (19.7%) compared with women with a previous live birth (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.90-10.32 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.11-3.27) and previously nulliparous women (aOR 4.97, 95% CI 2.68-9.24 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.08-3.36). Gestational age at stillbirth (>?30 weeks) and inter-pregnancy interval?
Notes
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PubMed ID
29361916 View in PubMed
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Are suicide deaths under-reported? Nationwide re-evaluations of 1800 deaths in Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275766
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(11):e009120
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ingvild Maria Tøllefsen
Karin Helweg-Larsen
Ingemar Thiblin
Erlend Hem
Marianne C Kastrup
Ullakarin Nyberg
Sidsel Rogde
Per-Henrik Zahl
Gunvor Østevold
Øivind Ekeberg
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(11):e009120
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adult
Aged
Autopsy
Cause of Death
Datasets as Topic
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Valid mortality statistics are important for healthcare planning and research. Suicides and accidents often present a challenge in the classification of the manner of death. The aim of this study was to analyse the reliability of the national suicide statistics by comparing the classification of suicide in the Scandinavian cause of death registers with a reclassification by 8 persons with different medical expertise (psychiatry, forensic pathology and public health) from each of the 3 Scandinavian countries.
The cause of death registers in Norway, Sweden and Denmark retrieved available information on a sample of 600 deaths in 2008 from each country. 200 were classified in the registers as suicides, 200 as accidents or undetermined and 200 as natural deaths. The reclassification comprised an assessment of the manner and cause of death as well as the level of certainty.
In total, 81%, 88% and 90% of deaths registered as suicide in the official mortality statistics were confirmed by experts using the Swedish, Norwegian and Danish data sets, respectively. About 3% of deaths classified as accidents or natural deaths in the cause of death registers were reclassified as suicides. However, after a second reclassification based on additional information, 9% of the natural deaths and accidents were reclassified as suicides in the Norwegian data set, and 21% of the undetermined deaths were reclassified as suicides in the Swedish data set. In total, the levels of certainty of the experts were 87% of suicides in the Norwegian data set, 77% in the Swedish data set and 92% in Danish data set; the uncertainty was highest in poisoning suicides.
A high percentage of reported suicides were confirmed as being suicides. Few accidents and natural deaths were reclassified as suicides. Hence, reclassification did not increase the overall official suicide statistics of the 3 Scandinavian countries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26608638 View in PubMed
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The association between alcohol, medicinal drug use and post-traumatic stress symptoms among Norwegian rescue workers after the 22 July twin terror attacks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284647
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2016 Sep;28:29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Stig Tore Bogstrand
Laila Skogstad
Øivind Ekeberg
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2016 Sep;28:29-33
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - etiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Rescue Work - manpower
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - complications - etiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Terrorism - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess whether the use of alcohol and medicinal drugs among rescue workers as a consequence of the 22 July terrorist attack was associated with post-traumatic stress symptoms, and explore if there were differences between affiliated and unaffiliated rescue workers.
Ten months after the bombing in the Oslo government district and the shooting at the youth camp on Ut?ya Island, a cross-sectional study of 1790 rescue and healthcare workers was conducted. The questionnaire included information on medicinal drug and alcohol use, experiences during rescue work and PTSS.
Few rescue workers reported alcohol (6.8% n?=?119) or medicinal drug (5.5% n?=?95) use as a consequence of participation in the 22 July terror attacks. Alcohol and medicinal drug use was associated with an elevated level of PTSS among the rescue workers who reported to use medicinal drugs (11.1 95% CI: 5.7-21.8) or alcohol (10.0 95% CI: 5.2-19.0) as a consequence of the terror attacks.
The study found a low level of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and alcohol and medicinal drug use among the rescue workers after the terror attacks in Norway on 22 July 2011. There was a strong association between both medicinal drug and alcohol use and elevated PTSS.
PubMed ID
27068750 View in PubMed
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Associations between heavy episodic drinking and alcohol related injuries: a case control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106167
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1076
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ingeborg Rossow
Stig Tore Bogstrand
Øivind Ekeberg
Per Trygve Normann
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, POB 565 Sentrum, Oslo N-0105, Norway. ir@sirus.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1076
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Binge Drinking - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol is a significant risk factor for injuries. This study addresses 1) whether the risk of alcohol related injury increases with frequency of heavy episodic drinking (HED) in a linear fashion, and 2) whether a small group of high risk drinkers accounts for the majority of alcohol related injuries.
We applied a case - control design. Cases were BAC positive injured patients (n = 534) and controls were respondents to a general population survey in Norway (n = 1947). Age and gender adjusted association between self-reported past year HED frequency and alcohol related injury risk was estimated in logistic regression models for all alcohol related injuries and for violence injuries and accident injuries separately.
An increase in HED was associated with an increase in risk of alcohol related injury, resembling a linear risk function. The small fraction of high risk drinkers (6.6%) accounted for 41.6% of all alcohol related injuries, thus lending support to the validity of the prevention paradox.
There is a strong relationship between frequency of heavy episodic drinking and risk of alcohol related injuries, yet the majority of alcohol related injuries are found among drinkers who are not in the high risk group.
PubMed ID
24228707 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards suicidal behaviour in outpatient clinics among mental health professionals in Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115411
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Astrid Berge Norheim
Tine Kristin Grimholt
Øivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Diakonhjemmet hospital, Postboks 23, Vinderen 0319, Oslo. astridberge.norheim@diakonsyk.no
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:90
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Ambulatory Care Facilities - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - manpower
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate attitudes of professionals working in mental health care outpatient clinics in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) (for children and adolescents aged 0-18 years) and District Psychiatric Centres (DPC) (for adults aged 18-67 years).
Professionals in four outpatient units in Oslo were enrolled (n = 229: 77%). The Understanding of Suicidal Patient scale (USP) (11 = positive to 55 = negative) and Attitudes Towards Suicide questionnaire (ATTS) (1 = totally disagree to 5 = totally agree) were used to assess professionals' attitudes. Questions explored competence, religion, experiences of and views on suicidal behaviour and its treatment.
All the professionals indicated positive attitudes (USP 18.7) and endorsed the view that suicide was preventable (ATTS 4.3). Professionals who had received supervision or were specialists had attitudes that were more positive. Professionals in CAP were less satisfied with available treatment. Psychiatric disorders were considered the most common cause of suicidal behaviour, and psychotherapy the most appropriate form of treatment. The professionals confirmed that patients with other disorders of comparable severity are followed up more systematically.
The professionals showed positive attitudes with minor differences between CAP and DPC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23510325 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward suicidal behaviour among professionals at mental health outpatient clinics in Stavropol, Russia and Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284793
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Jul 27;16:268
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-2016
Author
Astrid Berge Norheim
Tine K Grimholt
Ekaterina Loskutova
Oivind Ekeberg
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Jul 27;16:268
Date
Jul-27-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Russia
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Attitudes toward suicidal behaviour can be essential regarding whether patients seek or are offered help. Patients with suicidal behaviour are increasingly treated by mental health outpatient clinics. Our aim was to study attitudes among professionals at outpatient clinics in Stavropol, Russia and Oslo, Norway.
Three hundred and forty-eight (82 %) professionals anonymously completed a questionnaire about attitudes. Professionals at outpatient clinics in Stavropol (n?=?119; 94 %) and Oslo (n?=?229; 77 %) were enrolled in the study. The Understanding Suicidal Patients (USP) scale (11?=?positive to 55?=?negative) and the Attitudes Towards Suicide Scale (ATTS) (1?=?totally disagree, 5?=?totally agree) were used. Questions about religious background, perceived competence and experiences of and views on suicidal behaviour and treatment (0?=?totally disagree, 4?=?totally agree) were examined.
All groups reported positive attitudes, with significant differences between Stavropol and Oslo (USP score, 21.8 vs 18.7; p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
27465292 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics and physical functioning in persons hospitalized following the Norwegian terror attacks in July 2011: A follow up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299810
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2019 Mar 13; 51(3):225-233
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Mar-13-2019
Author
Grethe Månum
Marianne Løvstad
Kristin Wisløff-Aase
Johan Ræder
Anne-Kristine Schanke
Ingar Larsen
Grete Dyb
Øivind Ekeberg
Johan K Stanghelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, NO-14555 Nesoddtangen, Norway. grethe.manum@sunnaas.no.
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2019 Mar 13; 51(3):225-233
Date
Mar-13-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
History, 21st Century
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Terrorism - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe the clinical characteristics and physical functioning in persons hospitalized after 2 terror attacks in Norway in 2011.
Cross-sectional study with retrospective acute medical data.
Surviving persons hospitalized with physical injuries.
Medical and psychological assessments 3-4 years after injury, with data on injury type and severity collected from medical records.
A total of 30 out of 43 potential subjects participated (19 women, 11 men; age range 17-71 years (median 23 years)). Eighteen participants had suffered a severe injury, with New Injury Severity Scale (NISS) scores >?15. All body parts were affected. The number of surgical procedures ranged from 0 to 22 (median 3), and days in intensive care ranged from 0 to 59 (median 2.5), of which 16 had more than 24 h intensive care. Three to 4 years later, a majority of the participants had a broad spectrum of somatic and psychological problems and reduced physical functioning. Two-thirds of the participants reported their physical health to be unsatisfactory, and continuous need for healthcare and unmet needs were identified for all except 4 of the participants.
Persons hospitalized following a terror attack experience a broad spectrum of somatic and psychological problems and need long-term physical and psychological follow-up. This study indicates specific needs for rehabilitation after injuries acquired under psychological traumatic circumstances.
PubMed ID
30816422 View in PubMed
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Comparing ICD-9 and ICD-10: the impact on intentional and unintentional injury mortality statistics in Italy and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126907
Source
Injury. 2013 Jan;44(1):132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Finn Gjertsen
Silvia Bruzzone
Margarete E Vollrath
Monica Pace
Oivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. finn.gjertsen@fhi.no
Source
Injury. 2013 Jan;44(1):132-8
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Public Health
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
The international classification of diseases (ICD) provides guidelines for the collection, classification and dissemination of official cause-of-death statistics. New revisions of the ICD can potentially disrupt time trends of cause-of-death statistics and affect between-country comparisons. The aim of this study was to measure how switching from ICD-9 to ICD-10 affected mortality statistics for external causes of death, i.e. intentional and unintentional injuries, in Italy and Norway.
A sample of death certificates (N=454,897) were selected in Italy from the first year the ICD-10 was implemented (2003) and reclassified from ICD-10 to ICD-9 by the Italian National Institute of Statistics. A sample of death certificates was also selected in Norway (N=10,706) from the last year the ICD-9 was used (1995) and reclassified according to ICD-10 by Statistics Norway. The reclassification (double-coding) was performed by special trained personal in governmental offices responsible for official mortality statistics. Although the reclassification covered all causes of death (diseases and injuries) in the sample, our analysis focused on just one ICD chapter XX. This was external causes of mortality (injury deaths), and covered 15 selected categories of injuries.
The switch from ICD-9 to ICD-10 had a significant net impact on 8 of the 15 selected categories. In Italy, accidental falls decreased by 76%; traffic accidents decreased by 9%; suicide by hanging decreased by 3%; events of undetermined intent decreased by 69%; and overall injury deaths decreased by 4%. These net decreases reflect the moving of death records from injury categories in ICD-9 to other injury or disease categories in ICD-10. In Norway, the number of records in three categories decreased significantly: transport accidents, 9%; traffic accidents, 13%; and suicide by self-poisoning, 18%. No statistically significant differences (net changes) were observed in the total number of accidents, suicides and homicides in either country.
Switching to ICD-10 did not change the overall trends for accidents, homicides and suicides in either country. However, the number of records in some injury subcategories e.g. accidental falls and traffic accidents, decreased. Changing classification can thus affect the ranking of causes of injury mortality, with consequences for public health policy.
PubMed ID
22341556 View in PubMed
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