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The fate of chronic in-patients after closure of psychiatric nursing homes in Norway: a personal follow-up 6 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68400
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Nov;98(5):360-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
E W Martinsen
T. Ruud
L. Borge
O. Watne
S. Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Central Hospital of Sogn and Fjordane, Førde, Norway.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Nov;98(5):360-5
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chronic Disease
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Facility Closure
Health status
Humans
Institutionalization
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia
Social Support
Abstract
We evaluated all 107 chronic in-patients in a catchment area before and 6 years after a planned reduction in the number of psychiatric institution beds was implemented. At follow-up, 32 of the patients had died. One had probably committed suicide, while the others were elderly people who had died of natural causes. In the remaining patients the level of functioning was low, and below that which could be deduced from their level of symptoms, which was also low. The majority of the patients still lived in institutions, mostly in general nursing homes. Among those who had moved out, there were non-significant trends towards a reduction in symptoms and an increase in functioning. In general, the patients were satisfied with their new accommodation. Most of them needed extensive help and support to establish an acceptable standard of living in the community.
PubMed ID
9845173 View in PubMed
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[Quality assurance of psychiatric consultations in somatic hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203604
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Nov 10;118(27):4213-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1998
Author
H. Bille
F. Jakhelln
U F Malt
J O Roaldset
O. Tveiten
O. Watne
T. Herzog
F. Huyse
Author Affiliation
Drammen psykiatriske senter, Buskerud sentralsykehus.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Nov 10;118(27):4213-5
Date
Nov-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, General
Humans
Mental Health Services - standards
Models, organizational
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Referral and Consultation - standards
Abstract
Research has shown great variety in the clinical practice of consultation-liaison psychiatry in and between different countries. This paper presents the Norwegian experiences from a European collaborative study of quality management in consultation-liaison psychiatry. We describe a dynamic model for total quality management based on regular registration of some clinical data and the subsequent feed-back on changes of these. We discuss our experiences with this model and obstacles met in everyday work. Finally we point to different ways of implementing this method on a broader base in consultation-liaison psychiatry.
PubMed ID
9857804 View in PubMed
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Quality of life, loneliness, and social contact among long-term psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72435
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 1999 Jan;50(1):81-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
L. Borge
E W Martinsen
T. Ruud
O. Watne
S. Friis
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Studies, College of Sogn and Fjordane, Førde, Norway. lisbet.borge@ahf.hisf.no
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 1999 Jan;50(1):81-4
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Deinstitutionalization
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Loneliness
Long-Term Care - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Environment
Social Support
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Long-term patients who resided in county-operated psychiatric nursing homes in a county in Norway as of November 15, 1989, were visited by researchers in 1996 to assess how they perceived their living situations and how they had adjusted to a large reduction in county psychiatric beds during the six-year period. METHODS: Of 107 patients identified in 1989, a total of 75 were still alive in 1995. Seventy-four took part in the study and were visited at their place of residence. Thirty patients were living in general nursing homes, 23 patients remained in the psychiatric nursing homes, and 21 patients lived outside of institutions, in a personal residence. The quality of the patients' contact with others was rated by health care providers who were familiar with the patients. Forty-two patients, with a mean age of 56.9 years, responded to personal questions about their life situation, loneliness, and quality of life. RESULTS: Health care providers constituted the patients' most important network. Patients outside of institutions were the most socially active and had the most satisfying contact with their families. Patients reported a satisfactory quality of life, and those who lived outside institutions tended to be most satisfied. The variables of loneliness, satisfaction with neighborhood, and leisure time activities explained 63 percent of the variance in patients' subjective well-being. CONCLUSIONS: Most long-term patients who had moved out of psychiatric institutions were satisfied with their living situation and reported a relatively high quality of life.
PubMed ID
9890584 View in PubMed
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[Quality of life, loneliness and social contacts among persons with long-term mental illness]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72167
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 10;120(1):52-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2000
Author
L. Borge
E W Martinsen
T. Ruud
O. Watne
S. Friis
Author Affiliation
Høgskulen i Sogn og Fjordane Avdeling for helsefag, Førde. lisbet.borge@ahf.hisf.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 10;120(1):52-5
Date
Jan-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Community Networks
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Loneliness
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mentally Disabled Persons - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Isolation
Abstract
Chronic long-term patients who were residents in psychiatric nursing homes at a given point in time were traced six years later. Over this period, there had been deep cuts in the number of psychiatric beds in the county in question; we wanted to assess how the patients now perceived their quality of life. All 107 patients were traced; of the 75 who were still alive, 74 took part in the study and were visited at their place of residence. 42 patients, mean age 56.9 years, were able to respond to personal questions regarding social contact, loneliness and quality of life. Health care providers were the most important persons in the patients' networks. Most patients reported a satisfactory quality of life; those who lived outside institutions (N = 21) tended to be more satisfied than those in residential care, they were more socially active and had better contact with their families. The variables loneliness, satisfaction with neighbourhood and leisure activities explained 63% of the variance in quality of life.
PubMed ID
10815479 View in PubMed
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Vitamin K1 and 25(OH)D are independently and synergistically associated with a risk for hip fracture in an elderly population: a case control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266779
Source
Clin Nutr. 2015 Feb;34(1):101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Anne C Torbergsen
Leiv O Watne
Torgeir B Wyller
Frede Frihagen
Knut Strømsøe
Thomas Bøhmer
Morten Mowe
Source
Clin Nutr. 2015 Feb;34(1):101-6
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Bone Remodeling - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Osteocalcin - blood
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin K 1 - blood
Abstract
The incidence of hip fractures in Oslo is among the highest in the world. Vitamin D, as well as vitamin K, may play an important role in bone metabolism. We examined if vitamin K1 and 25(OH)D were associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, and whether the possible synergistic effect of these two micronutrients is mediated through bone turnover markers.
Blood was drawn for vitamin K1, 25(OH)D, and the bone turnover marker osteocalcin upon admission for hip fracture and in healthy controls.
Vitamin K1 and 25(OH)D were independently associated with a risk of hip fracture. The adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) per ng/ml increase in vitamin K1 was 0.07 (0.02-0.32), and that per nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D was 0.96 (0.95-0.98). There was a significant interaction between 25(OH)D and vitamin K1 (p
PubMed ID
24559841 View in PubMed
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