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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Age and sex differences in the distribution and ultrasound morphology of carotid atherosclerosis: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54157
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1999 Dec;19(12):3007-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
O. Joakimsen
K H Bonaa
E. Stensland-Bugge
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. oddmund.joakimsen@ism.uit.no
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1999 Dec;19(12):3007-13
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arteriosclerosis - pathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - ultrasonography
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Atherosclerosis begins early in life and is the major underlying cause of cardiovascular morbidity and death. Yet, population-based information on age and sex differences in the extent and morphology of atherosclerosis throughout life is scarce. Carotid atherosclerosis can be visualized with B-mode ultrasound and is a marker of atherosclerosis elsewhere in the circulation. We assessed both the prevalence and the morphology of carotid atherosclerosis by B-mode ultrasound in 3016 men and 3404 women, 25 to 84 years old, who participated in a population health survey. The participation rate was 88%. Plaque morphology was graded according to whether a plaque was predominantly soft (echolucent) or hard (echogenic). Atherosclerotic plaques were found in 55.4% of the men and 45.8% of the women. In men, there was a linear increase with age in the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis, whereas in women, there was a curvilinear age trend, with an inflection in the prevalence rate of women at approximately 50 years of age. The male predominance in atherosclerosis declined after the age of 50 years, the plaque prevalence being similar in elderly men and women. Men had softer plaques than women; this sex difference in plaque morphology increased significantly (P=0.005) with age. The sex difference in the prevalence of atherosclerosis and the female age trend in atherosclerosis show significant changes at the age of approximately 50 years, suggesting an adverse effect of menopause on atherosclerosis. The higher proportion of soft plaques in men compared with women increases with age and may partly account for the prevailing male excess risk of coronary heart disease in the elderly despite a similar prevalence of atherosclerosis in elderly men and women.
PubMed ID
10591682 View in PubMed
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Age and sex differences in the relationship between inherited and lifestyle risk factors and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67443
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Feb 1;154(2):437-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2001
Author
E. Stensland-Bugge
K H Bønaa
O. Joakimsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromso, N-9037, Tromsø, Norway. eva.stensland-bugge@ism.uit.no
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Feb 1;154(2):437-48
Date
Feb-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arteriosclerosis - blood - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Comparative Study
Female
Fibrinogen - metabolism
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Ultrasound measurement of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is regarded as a valid index of atherosclerosis. Age and sex differences in the distribution of, and risk factors for, IMT have not been investigated thoroughly. METHODS: In 1994-1995 a total of 6408 men and women aged 25-84 years living in the municipality of Tromsø, Norway, underwent ultrasound examination of carotid artery IMT and measurements of cardiovascular risk factors. RESULTS: Age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, body mass index, and smoking were independent predictors of IMT in both sexes. Fibrinogen levels and physical activity were associated with IMT in men only, whereas triglyceride levels were associated with IMT independently of HDL cholesterol in women only. A family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) was an independent predictor of IMT in both sexes, also when controlling for traditional CVD risk factors. The magnitude of the association between most risk factors and IMT did not differ depending on age, but the effects of physical activity and triglycerides were more pronounced at higher age. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that there are significant age and sex differences in the distribution and the determinants of subclinical atherosclerosis.
PubMed ID
11166777 View in PubMed
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[Carotid endarterectomy. Surgical complications and long-term prognosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225883
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 10;111(18):2253-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1991
Author
T. Iversen
H. Vea
D. Sørlie
O. Joakimsen
Author Affiliation
Ortopedisk avdeling, Regionsykehuset i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 10;111(18):2253-5
Date
Aug-10-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carotid Arteries - surgery
Endarterectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Prognosis
Abstract
227 patients underwent 259 carotid endarterectomies because of transitory ischemic attacks (TIA). All had a 50% or more carotid lumen reduction as revealed by angiography, and symptoms from the arteriosclerotic lesion. Surgical mortality/morbidity at 30 days was 2.6%. 5.3 years after the operation (1 month-13 years) the probability of stroke was 4.9%, which corresponds to a postendarerectomy stroke rate of 1% per year. The procedure may be of value if the rate of surgical complication is very low, but the net effect still depends upon the occurrence of other vascular complications during the follow-up period. The incidence of vascular diseases in this series of seriously affected arteriosclerotics was higher than in a matched normal population, and mortality was much higher. At present a somewhat restrictive indication for surgery seems justified.
PubMed ID
1896977 View in PubMed
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Echolucent plaques are associated with high risk of ischemic cerebrovascular events in carotid stenosis: the tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71953
Source
Circulation. 2001 May 1;103(17):2171-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2001
Author
E B Mathiesen
K H Bønaa
O. Joakimsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. ellisiv.mathiesen@ism.uit.no
Source
Circulation. 2001 May 1;103(17):2171-5
Date
May-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brain Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Carotid Stenosis - complications - metabolism - ultrasonography
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life tables
Lipids - chemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to assess in a prospective design whether plaque morphology is associated with risk of ischemic stroke and other cerebrovascular events in subjects with carotid stenosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 223 subjects with carotid stenosis (123 with 35% to 49% degree of stenosis, 100 with 50% to 99% stenosis) and 215 control subjects matched by age and sex who participated in a population health survey at baseline were followed up for 3 years. Plaque echogenicity was assessed by ultrasound at baseline and scored as echolucent, predominantly echolucent, predominantly echogenic, or echogenic. Forty-four subjects experienced >/=1 ischemic cerebrovascular events in the follow-up period. Plaque echogenicity, degree of stenosis, and white blood cell count were independent predictors of cerebrovascular events. The unadjusted relative risk for cerebrovascular events was 13.0 (95% CI 4.5 to 37.4) in subjects with echolucent plaques and 3.7 (95% CI 0.7 to 18.2) in subjects with echogenic plaques when subjects without stenosis were used as the reference. The adjusted relative risk for cerebrovascular events in subjects with echolucent plaques was 4.6 (95% CI 1.1 to 18.9), and there was a significant linear trend (P=0.015) for higher risk with increasing plaque echolucency. The adjusted relative risk for a 10% increase in the degree of stenosis was 1.2 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.4). CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with echolucent atherosclerotic plaques have increased risk of ischemic cerebrovascular events independent of degree of stenosis and cardiovascular risk factors. Subjects at high risk for ischemic vascular events may be identified by ultrasound assessment of plaque morphology.
PubMed ID
11331258 View in PubMed
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Intersonographer reproducibility and intermethod variability of ultrasound measurements of carotid artery stenosis: The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72184
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2000 May-Jun;10(3):207-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
E B Mathiesen
O. Joakimsen
K H Bønaa
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. Ellisiv.Mathiesen@ism.uit.no
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2000 May-Jun;10(3):207-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carotid Artery, Internal - ultrasonography
Carotid Stenosis - ultrasonography
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Observer Variation
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Knowledge of the reproducibility of a diagnostic method is important in order to evaluate its usefulness. Few studies have examined interobserver and intermethod agreement on ultrasound measurements of carotid stenosis. METHODS: Intersonographer agreement on ultrasound measurements of carotid plaque morphology and the estimated degree of stenosis by three ultrasound methods were assessed in a random sample of 51 participants with stenotic carotid arteries selected from a population health survey. The degree of stenosis was assessed by measurements of velocity, lumen diameter reduction and cross-sectional lumen area. Intermethod agreement on the degree of carotid stenosis was also assessed. RESULTS: Agreement on plaque echogenicity and heterogeneity was moderate (kappa = 0.56 and kappa = 0.60, respectively). The mean degree of stenosis and median absolute difference between observers of the estimated degree of stenosis by the velocity method were 46.3 and 10.8%, respectively. The corresponding values were 51.0 and 5.8% for the diameter method, and 57.1 and 7.2%, for the cross-sectional lumen method. The limits of agreement for intersonographer reproducibility varied between +/-19.7 and 26.5%. For all methods, reproducibility increased with increasing degree of stenosis. Differences between the methods were large in low-grade stenosis but were acceptable in high-grade stenosis. CONCLUSIONS: Considerable differences in ultrasound measurement of stenosis, which could lead to different clinical conclusions, were regularly encountered no matter what ultrasound method was used.
PubMed ID
10773647 View in PubMed
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Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are associated with echolucent carotid artery plaques: the tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71867
Source
Stroke. 2001 Sep;32(9):1960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
E B Mathiesen
K H Bønaa
O. Joakimsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. Ellisiv.Mathiesen@ism.uit.no
Source
Stroke. 2001 Sep;32(9):1960-5
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Stenosis - blood - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypolipoproteinemia - blood - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vascular Patency
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Ultrasound-assessed plaque morphology is an independent predictor of ischemic stroke. The purpose of this population-based cross-sectional nested case-control study was to examine the risk factors associated with carotid plaque morphology. METHODS: Ultrasonography of the right carotid artery was conducted on 6727 participants in a population health survey (response rate 79%). Plaque echogenicity, defined as reflectance of the emitted ultrasound signal, was scored as echolucent, predominantly echolucent, predominantly echogenic, or echogenic. Information on cardiovascular risk factors in all 216 participants who had carotid stenosis and in 223 control subjects matched by age and sex who did not have carotid stenosis was obtained from measurements of blood pressure, weight, height, and nonfasting blood samples and from a self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: In both univariate and multivariate analyses, low levels of HDL cholesterol and increasing degree of stenosis were independently associated with an increased risk of having an echolucent plaque. For 1-SD increase in HDL cholesterol, the adjusted odds of being in a lower plaque echogenicity category decreased by approximately 30% (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.93). CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that low levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of having echolucent, rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2002 Jan;33(1):321-211779935
PubMed ID
11546881 View in PubMed
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Low testosterone levels are associated with carotid atherosclerosis in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169260
Source
J Intern Med. 2006 Jun;259(6):576-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
J. Svartberg
D. von Mühlen
E. Mathiesen
O. Joakimsen
K H Bønaa
E. Stensland-Bugge
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. johan.svartberg@unn.no
Source
J Intern Med. 2006 Jun;259(6):576-82
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Atherosclerosis - blood - pathology - ultrasonography
Body mass index
Carotid Stenosis - blood - pathology - ultrasonography
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Testosterone - blood - deficiency
Tunica Intima - pathology - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - pathology - ultrasonography
Abstract
To study the relationship between endogenous sex hormone levels and intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery measured by ultrasonography.
Population-based cross-sectional study.
Sex hormone levels measured by immunoassay, anthropometric measurements and IMT was studied in 1482 men aged 25-84 years participating in the 1994-1995 Tromsø study. The data were analysed with partial correlation, multiple linear regression and logistic regression analysis.
Linear regression models showed that total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels, but not calculated free testosterone, serum oestradiol or dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels were inversely associated with the age-adjusted IMT (P = 0.008 and P
PubMed ID
16704558 View in PubMed
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Population-based study of age at menopause and ultrasound assessed carotid atherosclerosis: The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72170
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 May;53(5):525-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
O. Joakimsen
K H Bønaa
E. Stensland-Bugge
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromso, N-9037, Tromso, Norway. Oddmund.Joakimsen@ism.uit.no
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 May;53(5):525-30
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Menopause - physiology
Menopause, Premature
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Early menopause has been associated with higher prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular disease and death than late menopause, indicating that early loss of ovarian function and subsequent deficiency of estrogen may promote such diseases. No population-based studies have, however, examined the relation between age at menopause and atherosclerosis. We assessed the prevalence and the extent of carotid atherosclerosis by high-resolution B-mode ultrasound in 2588 postmenopausal women who participated in a population health survey. Information about age at menopause and menarche, parity, use of hormone replacement therapy, and prevalent diseases was collected, and cardiovascular risk factor levels were measured. Women with late menopause and women who ever had used postmenopausal estrogens had significantly less atherosclerosis than women with early menopause and those with never use of estrogen. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that estrogen protects women against cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
10812326 View in PubMed
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Prediction of mortality by ultrasound screening of a general population for carotid stenosis: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47834
Source
Stroke. 2000 Aug;31(8):1871-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
O. Joakimsen
K H Bonaa
E B Mathiesen
E. Stensland-Bugge
E. Arnesen
Author Affiliation
Institutes of Community Medicine, and Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. Oddmund.Joakimsen@ism.uit.no
Source
Stroke. 2000 Aug;31(8):1871-6
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Stenosis - mortality - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The extensive use of ultrasound examination of carotid arteries has revealed stenosis in many asymptomatic subjects, and clinical studies have shown that carotid stenosis is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death. However, information on stenosis as detected in a general population and its relation to mortality is scarce. The purpose of this population-based study was to assess whether carotid stenosis is a predictor of death. METHODS: In 1994 to 1995, 248 subjects with suspected carotid stenosis were identified among 6727 men and women 25 to 84 years of age who were examined with ultrasound. These subjects and 496 age- and sex-matched control subjects were followed up for 4.2 years, and the number and causes of deaths were registered. RESULTS: The unadjusted relative risk for death was 2.72 (95% CI, 1.57 to 4.75) for subjects with stenosis compared with control subjects. Adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors increased the relative risk to 3.47 (95% CI, 1.47 to 8.19). The adjusted relative risk in persons with stenosis and no cardiovascular disease or diabetes was 5.66 (95% CI, 1.53 to 20.90), which was higher than in subjects with stenosis and self-reported disease (1.79; 95% CI, 0.75 to 4.27). There was a dose-response relationship between degree of stenosis and risk of death (P=0.002 for linear trend). Carotid stenosis was a stronger predictor of death than self-reported cardiovascular disease or diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Carotid stenosis is a strong and independent predictor of death.
PubMed ID
10926949 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of and risk factors associated with carotid artery stenosis: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194170
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2001;12(1):44-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
E B Mathiesen
O. Joakimsen
K H Bønaa
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. ellisiv.mathiesen@ism.uit.no
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2001;12(1):44-51
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carotid Artery, Internal - ultrasonography
Carotid Stenosis - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
To assess prevalence, distribution, ultrasound characteristics and determinants of carotid artery stenosis in a large, population-based study of both women and men.
A total of 6,727 persons aged 25-84 years were screened for extracranial stenosis with Duplex ultrasound of the right carotid artery. Risk factors were compared in 225 persons with stenosis and 5,514 persons without.
The prevalence of carotid stenosis was higher in men than in women, where 3.8% (95% CI, 3.2-4.6%) had carotid stenosis, compared to 2.7% (95% CI, 2.2-3.3%) in women (p = 0.001). The prevalence gradually increased by age in both genders. Cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, fibrinogen, systolic blood pressure levels and current smoking were independently associated with carotid artery stenosis in both women and men. The presence of carotid stenosis was significantly associated with a history of cerebrovascular disease, coronary heart disease and peripheral artery disease. For each 10% increase in the degree of carotid stenosis, the risk of having had a cerebrovascular event increased by 26%.
The prevalence of carotid stenosis in the general population, as measured by ultrasound, is low. Age, male gender, smoking, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol (inverse), fibrinogen and systolic blood pressure are all independent predictors of carotid artery stenosis.
PubMed ID
11435679 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.