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Arctic cognition: a study of cognitive performance in summer and winter at 69 degrees N.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3317
Source
Appl Cogn Psychol. 1999 Dec;13(6):561-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
T. Brennen
M. Martinussen
B O Hansen
O. Hjemdal
Author Affiliation
University of Tromso, Norway. Timb@psyk.uit.no
Source
Appl Cogn Psychol. 1999 Dec;13(6):561-80
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attention
Cognition
Comparative Study
Darkness
Female
Humans
Light
Male
Memory
Middle Aged
Norway
Periodicity
Psychological Tests
Reaction Time
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasonal Affective Disorder - psychology
Seasons
Abstract
Evidence has accumulated over the past 15 years that affect in humans is cyclical. In winter there is a tendency to depression, with remission in summer, and this effect is stronger at higher latitudes. In order to determine whether human cognition is similarly rhythmical, this study investigated the cognitive processes of 100 participants living at 69 degrees N. Participants were tested in summer and winter on a range of cognitive tasks, including verbal memory, attention and simple reaction time tasks. The seasonally counterbalanced design and the very northerly latitude of this study provide optimal conditions for detecting impaired cognitive performance in winter, and the conclusion is negative: of five tasks with seasonal effects, four had disadvantages in summer. Like the menstrual cycle, the circannual cycle appears to influence mood but not cognition.
PubMed ID
11543349 View in PubMed
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Emotion regulation and its relation to symptoms of anxiety and depression in children aged 8-12 years: does parental gender play a differentiating role?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295824
Source
BMC Psychol. 2018 Aug 20; 6(1):42
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Aug-20-2018
Author
M E S Loevaas
A M Sund
J Patras
K Martinsen
O Hjemdal
S-P Neumer
S Holen
T Reinfjell
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. mona.lovaas@ntnu.no.
Source
BMC Psychol. 2018 Aug 20; 6(1):42
Date
Aug-20-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Anxiety - prevention & control - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Primary prevention - methods
Abstract
Symptoms of anxiety and depression are prevalent and highly comorbid in children, contributing to considerable impairment even at a subclinical level. Difficulties with emotion regulation are potentially related to both anxious and depressive symptoms. Research looking at maternal contributions to children's mental health dominates the literature but ignores the potentially important contributions of fathers.
The present study is part of the Coping Kids study in Norway, a randomized controlled study of a new indicated preventive intervention for children, EMOTION. EMOTION aims to reduce levels of anxious and depressive symptoms in children aged 8-12 years. Using cross sectional data and multiple regression analyses, we investigated the relations between anxious and depressive symptoms and emotion regulation in n?=?602 children. Symptoms were reported by the child, mothers and fathers. Emotion regulation was reported by mothers and fathers.
Symptoms of anxiety, as reported by parents, were associated with poorer emotion regulation. This association was also demonstrated for depressive symptoms as reported by both parents and children. When analyzing same gender reports, parental gender did not differentiate the relationship between anxiety symptoms and emotion regulation. For depressive symptoms, we did find a differentiating effect of parental gender, as the association with dysregulation of emotion was stronger in paternal reports, and the association with adaptive emotion regulation was stronger in maternal reports. When using reports from the opposite parent, the emotion regulation difficulties were still associated with depressive and anxiety symptoms, however exhibiting somewhat different emotional regulation profiles.
Problems with emotion regulation probably coexists with elevated levels of internalizing symptoms in children. In future research, both caregivers should be included.
The regional ethics committee (REC) of Norway approved the study. Registration number: 2013/1909; Project title: Coping Kids: a randomized controlled study of a new indicated preventive intervention for children with symptoms of anxiety and depression. ClinicalTrials.gov; Protocol ID 228846/H10 .
Notes
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PubMed ID
30126444 View in PubMed
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