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Estimates of harm associated with changes in Swedish alcohol policy: results from past and present estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81308
Source
Addiction. 2006 Aug;101(8):1096-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Andreasson Sven
Holder Harold D
Norström Thor
Osterberg Esa
Rossow Ingeborg
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Stockholm, Sweden. sven.andreasson@fhi.se
Source
Addiction. 2006 Aug;101(8):1096-105
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - mortality
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - mortality
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Female
Forecasting
Harm Reduction
Health Policy - economics
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality - therapy
Male
Models, Statistical
Psychoses, Alcoholic - mortality - therapy
Sex Distribution
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Taxes
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: (i) To compare actual developments of alcohol-related harm in Sweden with estimates derived prior to major policy changes in 1995 and (ii) to estimate the effects on consumption and alcohol-related harm of reducing alcohol prices in Sweden. DESIGN: Alcohol effect parameters expressing the strength of the relationship between overall alcohol consumption and different alcohol-related harms were obtained from ARIMA (Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average) time-series analyses. MEASUREMENTS: Measures of Swedish alcohol-related mortality (liver cirrhosis, alcoholic psychosis, alcoholism and alcohol poisoning), accident mortality, suicide, homicide, assaults and sickness absence from 1950 to 1995. FINDINGS: Previous estimates of alcohol-related harm based on changes in alcohol consumption for the period 1994-2002 for Sweden were, in some cases (e.g. violent assaults and accidents), relatively close to the actual harm levels, whereas in other cases (e.g. homicides, alcohol-related mortality and suicide) they diverged from observed harm levels. A tax cut by 40% on spirits and by 15% on wine is estimated to increase total per capita alcohol consumption by 0.35 litre. This increase is estimated to cause 289 additional deaths, 1627 additional assaults and 1.6 million additional sickness absence days. CONCLUSIONS: The estimates of future changes in harm based upon even relatively modest increases in alcohol consumption produce considerable negative effects, with large economic consequences for the Swedish economy. The additional alcohol-related deaths, for instance, amount to more than half the number of yearly traffic fatalities in Sweden.
PubMed ID
16869839 View in PubMed
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Per capita alcohol consumption and sickness absence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80686
Source
Addiction. 2006 Oct;101(10):1421-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Norström Thor
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. totto@sofi.su.se
Source
Addiction. 2006 Oct;101(10):1421-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data - trends
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIM: The purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between aggregate alcohol consumption and sickness absence in Sweden. DATA AND METHODS: Two indicators of sickness absence were used, one based on sickness insurance data, the other on data from the labour force surveys. Alcohol consumption was gauged by sales of pure alcohol (100%) per inhabitant 15 years of age and older. Because changes in the economy may affect alcohol consumption as well as sickness absence, two macroeconomic indicators were included as control variables: unemployment and real wages. The study period was 1935-2002. The data were analysed through the Box-Jenkins method for time-series analyses. FINDINGS: A 1-litre increase in total consumption was associated with a 13% increase in sickness absence among men (P
PubMed ID
16968343 View in PubMed
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Per capita alcohol consumption and sickness absence in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89318
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2009 Aug;19(4):383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Norström Thor
Moan Inger Synnøve
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. totto@sofi.su.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2009 Aug;19(4):383-8
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is only one previous study addressing the relationship between population drinking and sickness absence. That study, based on Swedish time-series data, showed a statistically significant relationship between per capita alcohol consumption and the male sickness absence rate. Estimates suggested that a 1-l increase in consumption was associated with a 13% increase in sickness absence among men. In the present study, we aim at replicating and expanding the Swedish study on the basis of data for Norway. METHODS: The outcome measure comprised annual data for Norway on registered sickness absence for manual employees covering the period 1957-2001. The unemployment rate was included as a control, as this factor may be correlated with alcohol as well as sickness absence. Alcohol consumption was gauged by sales of alcohol (total and beverage specific by beer, spirits and wine) per inhabitant 15 years and above. The data were analysed using the Box-Jenkins method for time-series analysis. RESULTS: The results suggested that a 1-l increase in total consumption was associated with a 13% increase in sickness absence among men (P
PubMed ID
19369492 View in PubMed
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The role of welfare state principles and generosity in social policy programmes for public health: an international comparative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91327
Source
Lancet. 2008 Nov 8;372(9650):1633-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-8-2008
Author
Lundberg Olle
Yngwe Monica Aberg
Stjärne Maria Kölegård
Elstad Jon Ivar
Ferrarini Tommy
Kangas Olli
Norström Thor
Palme Joakim
Fritzell Johan
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 2008 Nov 8;372(9650):1633-40
Date
Nov-8-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Family
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Mortality
Public Health - economics - statistics & numerical data
Public Policy
Regression Analysis
Social Welfare - economics
United States
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many important social determinants of health are also the focus for social policies. Welfare states contribute to the resources available for their citizens through cash transfer programmes and subsidised services. Although all rich nations have welfare programmes, there are clear cross-national differences with respect to their design and generosity. These differences are evident in national variations in poverty rates, especially among children and elderly people. We investigated to what extent variations in family and pension policies are linked to infant mortality and old-age excess mortality. METHODS: Infant mortality rates and old-age excess mortality rates were analysed in relation to social policy characteristics and generosity. We did pooled cross-sectional time-series analyses of 18 OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries during the period 1970-2000 for family policies and 1950-2000 for pension policies. FINDINGS: Increased generosity in family policies that support dual-earner families is linked with lower infant mortality rates, whereas the generosity in family policies that support more traditional families with gainfully employed men and homemaking women is not. An increase by one percentage point in dual-earner support lowers infant mortality by 0.04 deaths per 1000 births. Generosity in basic security type of pensions is linked to lower old-age excess mortality, whereas the generosity of earnings-related income security pensions is not. An increase by one percentage point in basic security pensions is associated with a decrease in the old age excess mortality by 0.02 for men as well as for women. INTERPRETATION: The ways in which social policies are designed, as well as their generosity, are important for health because of the increase in resources that social policies entail. Hence, social policies are of major importance for how we can tackle the social determinants of health.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2008 Nov 8;372(9650):160718994644
Comment In: Lancet. 2008 Nov 8;372(9650):1609-1018994647
PubMed ID
18994660 View in PubMed
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Sweden--is alcohol becoming an ordinary commodity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80254
Source
Addiction. 2006 Nov;101(11):1543-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Norström Thor
Ramstedt Mats
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. totto@sofi.su.se
Source
Addiction. 2006 Nov;101(11):1543-5
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Beer - adverse effects
Harm Reduction
Humans
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - adverse effects
PubMed ID
17034433 View in PubMed
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