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DNA DAMAGE IN ARCTIC SEABIRDS: BASELINE, SENSITIVITY TO A GENOTOXIC STRESSOR AND ASSOCIATION TO ORGANOHALOGEN CONTAMINANTS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286975
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Nov 09;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-09-2017
Author
Ane Haarr
Ketil Hylland
Norith Eckbo
Geir Wing Gabrielsen
Dorte Herzke
Jan Ove Bustnes
Pierre Blevin
Olivier Chastel
Børge Moe
Sveinn Are Hanssen
Kjetil Sagerup
Katrine Borgå
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Nov 09;
Date
Nov-09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Environmental contaminants are found throughout Arctic marine ecosystems, and their presence in seabirds has been associated with toxicological responses. However, there are few studies of genotoxicity in Arctic avian wildlife. The purpose of the present study was to quantify DNA damage in lymphocytes of selected seabird species and to examine whether accumulation of organohalogen contaminants ( OHCs) affects DNA damage. Blood was sampled from common eider (Somateria mollissima), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus), arctic skua (Stercorarius parasiticus), and great skua (Stercorarius skua) in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. Contaminant concentrations found in the six species differed presumably due to foraging ecology and biomagnification. Despite large differences in contaminant concentrations, ranging from SOHCs 3.3 ng/g ww in the common eider to SOHCs 895 ng/g ww in the great skua, there was no strong difference among the species in baseline DNA damage or sensitivity to a genotoxic stressor (i.e. hydrogen peroxide). Baseline levels of DNA damage were low, with median values ranging from 1.7% in the common eider to 8.6% in the great skua. There were no associations between DNA damage and contaminants in the investigated species, suggesting that contaminant concentrations in Kongsfjorden are too low to evoke genotoxic effects, or possibly that lymphocytes are resistant to strand breakage. Clearly, genotoxicity is a topic for future studies of Arctic seabirds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
PubMed ID
29120089 View in PubMed
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DNA damage in Arctic seabirds: Baseline, sensitivity to a genotoxic stressor, and association with organohalogen contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296924
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2018 04; 37(4):1084-1091
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Ane Haarr
Ketil Hylland
Norith Eckbo
Geir Wing Gabrielsen
Dorte Herzke
Jan Ove Bustnes
Pierre Blévin
Olivier Chastel
Børge Moe
Sveinn Are Hanssen
Kjetil Sagerup
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2018 04; 37(4):1084-1091
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Charadriiformes - metabolism
DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded - drug effects
DNA Damage
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated - toxicity
Lipids - analysis
Mutagens - toxicity
Principal Component Analysis
Abstract
Environmental contaminants are found throughout Arctic marine ecosystems, and their presence in seabirds has been associated with toxicological responses. However, there are few studies of genotoxicity in Arctic avian wildlife. The purpose of the present study was to quantify deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in lymphocytes of selected seabird species and to examine whether accumulation of organohalogen contaminants (SOHCs) affects DNA damage. Blood was sampled from common eider (Somateria mollissima), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus), arctic skua (Stercorarius parasiticus), and great skua (Stercorarius skua) in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (Norway). Contaminant concentrations found in the 6 species differed, presumably because of foraging ecology and biomagnification. Despite large differences in contaminant concentrations, ranging from SOHCs 3.3?ng/g wet weight in the common eider to SOHCs 895?ng/g wet weight in the great skua, there was no strong difference among the species in baseline DNA damage or sensitivity to a genotoxic stressor (hydrogen peroxide). Baseline levels of DNA damage were low, with median values ranging from 1.7% in the common eider to 8.6% in the great skua. There were no associations between DNA damage and contaminants in the investigated species, suggesting that contaminant concentrations in Kongsfjorden are too low to evoke genotoxic effects, or possibly that lymphocytes are resistant to strand breakage. Clearly, genotoxicity is a topic for future studies of Arctic seabirds. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:1084-1091. © 2017 SETAC.
PubMed ID
29120089 View in PubMed
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Individual variability in contaminants and physiological status in a resident Arctic seabird species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298869
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jan 25; 249:191-199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-25-2019
Author
Norith Eckbo
Céline Le Bohec
Victor Planas-Bielsa
Nicholas A Warner
Quentin Schull
Dorte Herzke
Sandrine Zahn
Ane Haarr
Geir W Gabrielsen
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Department of Biosciences, Problemveien 7, 0315, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: norith.eckbo@ibv.uio.no.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jan 25; 249:191-199
Date
Jan-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
While migratory seabirds dominate ecotoxicological studies within the Arctic, there is limited knowledge about exposure and potential effects from circulating legacy and emerging contaminants in species who reside in the high-Arctic all year round. Here, we focus on the case of the Mandt's Black guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii) breeding at Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (79.00°N, 11.66°E) and investigate exposure to legacy and emerging contaminants in relation to individual physiological status, i.e. body condition, oxidative stress and relative telomere length. Despite its benthic-inshore foraging strategy, the Black guillemot displayed overall similar contaminant concentrations in blood during incubation (?PCB11 (15.7?ng/g w.w.)?>??PFAS5 (9.9?ng/g w.w.)?>??Pesticides9 (6.7?ng/g w.w.)?>??PBDE4 (2.7?ng/g w.w.), and Hg (0.3 µg/g d.w.) compared to an Arctic migratory seabird in which several contaminant-related stress responses have been observed. Black guillemots in poorer condition tended to display higher levels of contaminants, higher levels of reactive oxygen metabolites, lower plasmatic antioxidant capacity, and shorter telomere lengths; however the low sample size restrict any strong conclusions. Nevertheless, our data suggests that nonlinear relationships with a threshold may exist between accumulated contaminant concentrations and physiological status of the birds. These findings were used to build a hypothesis to be applied in future modelling for describing how chronic exposure to contaminants may be linked to telomere dynamics.
PubMed ID
30889502 View in PubMed
Less detail

Individual variability in contaminants and physiological status in a resident Arctic seabird species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301923
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jun; 249:191-199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Norith Eckbo
Céline Le Bohec
Victor Planas-Bielsa
Nicholas A Warner
Quentin Schull
Dorte Herzke
Sandrine Zahn
Ane Haarr
Geir W Gabrielsen
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Department of Biosciences, Problemveien 7, 0315, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: norith.eckbo@ibv.uio.no.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jun; 249:191-199
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Birds - metabolism - physiology
Charadriiformes - metabolism - physiology
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Mercury - metabolism
Svalbard
Abstract
While migratory seabirds dominate ecotoxicological studies within the Arctic, there is limited knowledge about exposure and potential effects from circulating legacy and emerging contaminants in species who reside in the high-Arctic all year round. Here, we focus on the case of the Mandt's Black guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii) breeding at Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (79.00°N, 11.66°E) and investigate exposure to legacy and emerging contaminants in relation to individual physiological status, i.e. body condition, oxidative stress and relative telomere length. Despite its benthic-inshore foraging strategy, the Black guillemot displayed overall similar contaminant concentrations in blood during incubation (?PCB11 (15.7?ng/g w.w.)?>??PFAS5 (9.9?ng/g w.w.)?>??Pesticides9 (6.7?ng/g w.w.)?>??PBDE4 (2.7?ng/g w.w.), and Hg (0.3 µg/g d.w.) compared to an Arctic migratory seabird in which several contaminant-related stress responses have been observed. Black guillemots in poorer condition tended to display higher levels of contaminants, higher levels of reactive oxygen metabolites, lower plasmatic antioxidant capacity, and shorter telomere lengths; however the low sample size restrict any strong conclusions. Nevertheless, our data suggests that nonlinear relationships with a threshold may exist between accumulated contaminant concentrations and physiological status of the birds. These findings were used to build a hypothesis to be applied in future modelling for describing how chronic exposure to contaminants may be linked to telomere dynamics.
PubMed ID
30889502 View in PubMed
Less detail