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Microplastics in the Arctic: A case study with sub-surface water and fish samples off Northeast Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296003
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Nov; 242(Pt B):1078-1086
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Silvia Morgana
Laura Ghigliotti
Noelia Estévez-Calvar
Roberto Stifanese
Alina Wieckzorek
Tom Doyle
Jørgen S Christiansen
Marco Faimali
Francesca Garaventa
Author Affiliation
Istituto di Scienze Marine, Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche (CNR-ISMAR), Via De Marini 6, 16149, Genova, Italy. Electronic address: silvia.morgana@ge.ismar.cnr.it.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Nov; 242(Pt B):1078-1086
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environmental monitoring
Fishes
Greenland
Plastics - analysis
Seawater
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The Arctic is a unique and fragile ecosystem that needs to be preserved and protected. Despite its remoteness, plastic pollution has been documented in this region. In the coming years, it is likely to worsen since, with climate changes and the opening of new shipping routes, the human presence is going to increase in the whole area. Here, we investigated the presence of microplastics (MPs) in sub-surface water and in two mid-trophic level Arctic fishes collected off Northeast Greenland: the demersal bigeye sculpin, Triglops nybelini, and the pelagic polar cod, Boreogadus saida. Plastics debris were found in the water samples at a concentration of 2.4 items/m3 ±0.8 SD which is higher than in most seas at lower latitudes. Both fish species had eaten MPs with different proportion among the species, 34% for T. nybelini (n?=?71) and 18% for B. saida (n?=?85). The significant difference in the occurrence of MPs between the two species is likely a consequence of their feeding behavior and habitat. Polyethylene was the main plastic polymer for water samples (41%, n?=?17) and polyester (34%, n?=?156) for fish samples as analyzed by Fourier Transformed Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Our data underscore that the Arctic regions are turning into a hotspot for plastic pollution, and this calls urgently for precautionary measures.
PubMed ID
30096546 View in PubMed
Less detail

Microplastics in the Arctic: A case study with sub-surface water and fish samples off Northeast Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294252
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Nov; 242(Pt B):1078-1086
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Silvia Morgana
Laura Ghigliotti
Noelia Estévez-Calvar
Roberto Stifanese
Alina Wieckzorek
Tom Doyle
Jørgen S Christiansen
Marco Faimali
Francesca Garaventa
Author Affiliation
Istituto di Scienze Marine, Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche (CNR-ISMAR), Via De Marini 6, 16149, Genova, Italy. Electronic address: silvia.morgana@ge.ismar.cnr.it.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Nov; 242(Pt B):1078-1086
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The Arctic is a unique and fragile ecosystem that needs to be preserved and protected. Despite its remoteness, plastic pollution has been documented in this region. In the coming years, it is likely to worsen since, with climate changes and the opening of new shipping routes, the human presence is going to increase in the whole area. Here, we investigated the presence of microplastics (MPs) in sub-surface water and in two mid-trophic level Arctic fishes collected off Northeast Greenland: the demersal bigeye sculpin, Triglops nybelini, and the pelagic polar cod, Boreogadus saida. Plastics debris were found in the water samples at a concentration of 2.4 items/m3 ±0.8 SD which is higher than in most seas at lower latitudes. Both fish species had eaten MPs with different proportion among the species, 34% for T. nybelini (n?=?71) and 18% for B. saida (n?=?85). The significant difference in the occurrence of MPs between the two species is likely a consequence of their feeding behavior and habitat. Polyethylene was the main plastic polymer for water samples (41%, n?=?17) and polyester (34%, n?=?156) for fish samples as analyzed by Fourier Transformed Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Our data underscore that the Arctic regions are turning into a hotspot for plastic pollution, and this calls urgently for precautionary measures.
PubMed ID
30096546 View in PubMed
Less detail