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[Acceptance of mammographic screening by immigrant women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19313
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Jan 7;164(2):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-2002
Author
Ida Kristine Holk
Nils Rosdahl
Karen L Damgaard Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Københavns, Frederiksberg Kommuner, Henrik Pontoppidansvej 8, DK-2200 København N.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Jan 7;164(2):195-200
Date
Jan-7-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology - radiography
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Mammography - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pakistan - ethnology
Patient compliance
Poland - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate compliance by ethnic groups to the mammography screening programme in the City of Copenhagen over six years and to look at developments over time. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mammography screening has, since 1 April 1991, been offered free of charge to all women between 50 and 69 years of age in the City of Copenhagen. Data on women born in Poland, Turkey, Yugoslavia, and Pakistan divided into five-year groups were compared to that of women born in Denmark and all other foreign-born women. Data from 1991 to 1997 were grouped according to the mammography performed, the offer refused, or non-appearance. RESULTS: Whereas 71% of Danish-born women accepted mammography, compliance by foreign-born women was significantly lower. The offer was accepted by 36% of Pakistanis, 45% of Yugoslavians, 53% of Turks, and 64% of Poles. Compliance fell in all ethnic groups with advancing age. Of the Danish women, 16% failed to keep the appointment. The corresponding percentages were 52 for Pakistanis, 48 for Yugoslavians, 41 for Turks, and 23 for Poles. The proportion of women who actively refused the offer was similar in all groups. The number of invited women fell during the period. CONCLUSIONS: The lower participation of women from the countries under study might have various explanations: among them the language barrier, procedure-related factors, and a lower incidence of breast cancer in the countries of origin.
PubMed ID
11831089 View in PubMed
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The AIDS epidemic in the city of Copenhagen, Denmark: potential years of life lost and impact on life expectancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7136
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(3):222-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jeanne D Johansen
Else Smith
Knud Juel
Nils Rosdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(3):222-7
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Adult
Cause of Death
Cities - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
AIMS: This study seeks to describe the impact of AIDS on the city of Copenhagen by estimating potential years of life lost (PYLL) before the age of 65 years and to estimate the impact of AIDS deaths on life expectancy for males and females. METHODS: All AIDS cases reported to the national AIDS surveillance register for residents in the city of Copenhagen in the period 1983-98 were included. For comparative purposes data were obtained on six other causes of death: accidents, suicide, lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease, testicular cancer, and breast cancer. RESULTS: Overall, deaths from AIDS accounted for 8% of all PYLL in men and showed an increasing tendency from 1983 to 1991, when it became the leading cause of PYLL. AIDS had most impact in men in the age group 25-44 years and accounted for 29% of all PYLL in this group at the peak in 1993, decreasing significantly after the introduction of anti-retroviral treatments to 5% of PYLL in 1998. Other leading causes of PYLL, accidents and suicide, also showed a decreasing tendency over the years, but of a much smaller magnitude than AIDS. The impact of AIDS in women was more modest. In the entire study period suicide, accidents, and breast cancer were the leading causes of PYLL in women. It was shown that AIDS deaths at the top of the epidemic in 1991-95 were responsible for a loss of 0.76 years in life expectancy for men and 0.08 years for women. CONCLUSIONS: AIDS has had a considerable impact on potential years of life lost. A significant decline in AIDS deaths has been seen since 1995 with an effect on life expectancy for men in the city of Copenhagen.
PubMed ID
16040464 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of Hodgkin's lymphoma after infectious mononucleosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18179
Source
N Engl J Med. 2003 Oct 2;349(14):1324-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2003
Author
Henrik Hjalgrim
Johan Askling
Klaus Rostgaard
Stephen Hamilton-Dutoit
Morten Frisch
Jin-Song Zhang
Mette Madsen
Nils Rosdahl
Helle Bossen Konradsen
Hans H Storm
Mads Melbye
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. hhj@ssi.dk
Source
N Engl J Med. 2003 Oct 2;349(14):1324-32
Date
Oct-2-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology - isolation & purification
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Incidence
Infectious Mononucleosis - complications - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Reed-Sternberg Cells - virology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma in young adults. Whether the association is causal remains unclear. METHODS: We compared the incidence rates of Hodgkin's lymphoma in two population-based Danish cohorts of patients who were tested for infectious mononucleosis: 17,045 with serologic evidence of having had acute EBV infection, and 24,614 with no such evidence. We combined the cohort of patients who had serologically verified infectious mononucleosis with a cohort of 21,510 Swedish patients with infectious mononucleosis (combined total, 38,555). Biopsy specimens of Hodgkin's lymphomas occurring during follow-up in this combined cohort were tested serologically for the presence of EBV. Using this information, we modeled the relative risk of EBV-negative and EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma in different periods after the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis and estimated the median incubation time for mononucleosis-related EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma. RESULTS: Only serologically confirmed infectious mononucleosis was associated with a persistently increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma. Sixteen of 29 tumors (55 percent), obtained from patients with infectious mononucleosis, had evidence of EBV. There was no evidence of an increased risk of EBV-negative Hodgkin's lymphoma after infectious mononucleosis. In contrast, the risk of EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma was significantly increased (relative risk, 4.0; 95 percent confidence interval, 3.4 to 4.5). The estimated median incubation time from mononucleosis to EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma was 4.1 years (95 percent confidence interval, 1.8 to 8.3). CONCLUSIONS: A causal association between infectious mononucleosis-related EBV infection and the EBV-positive subgroup of Hodgkin's lymphomas is likely in young adults.
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 2003 Oct 2;349(14):1309-1114523136
PubMed ID
14523140 View in PubMed
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[Medical officers for better and for worse. A short report about the Danish medical officer system 1945-2005].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171309
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Dec 12;167(50):4734-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-2005
Author
Nils Rosdahl
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Medicinsk Museion. nrosdahl@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Dec 12;167(50):4734-6
Date
Dec-12-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Family Practice - history
Health Policy - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Physicians, Family - history
Public Health - history
Social Medicine - history
PubMed ID
16393530 View in PubMed
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[Physicians and nurses subjected to disciplinary actions because of substance abuse. Ten years of experience with supervision in Copenhagen]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9833
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Nov 18;164(47):5505-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-2002
Author
Elisabet Tornberg Hansen
Jan R Fouchard
Jane H Hoffmeyer
Nils Rosdahl
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Københavns Amt, Herlufsholmvej 37, 2., DK-2720 Vanløse.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Nov 18;164(47):5505-9
Date
Nov-18-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Employee Discipline - legislation & jurisprudence
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Medical Staff - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Professional Impairment - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Substance Abuse Detection - legislation & jurisprudence
Substance-Related Disorders - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Medical Health Officers supervise medical staff on behalf of the Danish National Board of Health. The Board can impose disciplinary action on registered providers of health care. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This retrospective investigation was based on case reports from 1 January 1989 to 31 December 1995 on medical staff under individual supervision because of alcohol or drug abuse, with a 3-year follow-up to 31 December 1998 in Greater Copenhagen (about 1.25 million inhabitants). RESULTS: Altogether 173 health personnel were identified. Of these, 47 physicians and 91 nurses had disciplinary actions imposed on them because of abuse. In well over a third the abuse had lasted less than two years, whereas in a third it had lasted more than five years before admission to individual supervision. Half of both physicians and nurses had undergone psychiatric treatment before that time. Frequent disciplinary actions imposed were examination of urine passed without prior warning and controlled treatment of alcohol abuse. Difficulties in adhering to these conditions were found in one third to half of the cases. The Medical Health Officers notified the National Board of Health of breaches in 64%, often several times for each person. At the end of the follow-up period, 49% were still working. There was a statistically significant excess mortality in the group. Of the 26 dead, four had committed suicide and in a further 12 cases poisoning or abuse was a contributory cause of death. DISCUSSION: Earlier detection, a tightening of sanctions, and improved treatment are recommended.
PubMed ID
12523025 View in PubMed
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[Thorvald Madsen: Mr State Serum Institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161232
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Aug 27;169(35):2877
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-27-2007

6 records – page 1 of 1.